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Sat Feb 9, 2013, 03:01 PM

75-year-old soybean farmer sees Monsanto lawsuit reach U.S. Supreme Court

As David versus Goliath battles go it is hard to imagine a more uneven fight than the one about to play out in front of the US supreme court between Vernon Hugh Bowman and Monsanto.

On the one side is Bowman, a single 75-year-old Indiana soybean farmer who is still tending the same acres of land as his father before him in rural south-western Indiana. On the other is a gigantic multibillion dollar agricultural business famed for its zealous protection of its commercial rights.

Not that Bowman sees it that way. “I really don’t consider it as David and Goliath. I don’t think of it in those terms. I think of it in terms of right and wrong,” Bowman told The Guardian in an interview.

Either way, in the next few weeks Bowman and Monsanto’s opposing legal teams will face off in front of America’s most powerful legal body, weighing in on a case that deals with one of the most fundamental questions of modern industrial farming: who controls the rights to the seeds planted in the ground.

The legal saga revolves around Monsanto’s aggressive protection of its soybean known as Roundup Ready, which have been genetically engineered to be resistant to its Roundup herbicide or its generic equivalents. When Bowman – or thousands of other farmers just like him – plant Monsanto’s seeds in the ground they are obliged to only harvest the resulting crop, not keep any of it back for planting the next year. So each season, the farmer has to buy new Monsanto seeds to plant.

However, farmers are able to buy excess soybeans from local grain elevators, many of which are likely to be Roundup Ready due to the huge dominance Monsanto has in the market. Indeed in Indiana it is believed more than 90% of soybeans for sale as “commodity seeds” could be such beans, each containing the genes Monsanto developed.

More at: http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/02/09/75-year-old-soybean-farmer-sees-monsanto-lawsuit-reach-u-s-supreme-court/

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Reply 75-year-old soybean farmer sees Monsanto lawsuit reach U.S. Supreme Court (Original post)
Playinghardball Feb 2013 OP
Buzz Clik Feb 2013 #1
OrwellwasRight Feb 2013 #4
laundry_queen Feb 2013 #17
xchrom Feb 2013 #2
midnight Feb 2013 #3
Champion Jack Feb 2013 #7
OrwellwasRight Feb 2013 #5
freshwest Feb 2013 #6
polly7 Feb 2013 #8
zeemike Feb 2013 #9
groundloop Feb 2013 #13
freshwest Feb 2013 #15
CrispyQ Feb 2013 #19
upi402 Feb 2013 #10
Kalidurga Feb 2013 #11
Ikonoklast Feb 2013 #12
xtraxritical Feb 2013 #14
Fire Walk With Me Feb 2013 #16
laundry_queen Feb 2013 #18
CrispyQ Feb 2013 #20
woo me with science Feb 2013 #21
Berlum Feb 2013 #22

Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 03:19 PM

1. There are two really big reasons why Monsanto is seen as the devil incarnate:

1) The business practices discussed in the OP. Monsanto wants to protect its patents and is willing to look like a bully in doing so.

2) Releasing GMOs into the field, potentially killing everyone.

It seems to me that you cannot support a farmer in his pursuit of using Roundup Ready soybeans while ignoring the contention that Roundup Ready soybeans are the devil's seeds.

So, if we truly had a deep rooted, rational, and justifiable fear of GMOs, should we not be condemning this farmer for so eagerly sewing these seeds and possibly killing us all?

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Response to Buzz Clik (Reply #1)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 03:46 PM

4. He is using them anyway in his "first planting"

so his use of them, buying them from a third party after the profits from the first sale were already made hardly does damage. t is an drop in the ocean. We should support the farmer for two reasons:

1) If Monsanto wins, it could have widespread implications for the entire economy as it could affect the right of all of us to sell a patented product second hand. Do you want to lose the right to sell your BMV car or your Dyson vacuum when you're done with it? Why should those who invent the IP have control over it FOREVER all through the consumer chain?

2) If you believe Monsanto's bullshit about how if the farmer wins then it will destroy Monsanto by destroying its profit model, then the farmer will have killed round up Ready soybeans forever (well at least new ones, no one can do anything about the breeding with natural seeds that has already occurred). That's a good thing.







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Response to OrwellwasRight (Reply #4)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 03:55 AM

17. Nailed it. nt

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 03:37 PM

2. Du rec. Nt

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 03:39 PM

3. Monsanto is running a loop, and hopefully this farmer will be able to break it and protect

the right to use another route of seed farming..

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Response to midnight (Reply #3)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 03:53 PM

7. k&r

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 03:47 PM

5. IP and commerce are king in this court.

Sadly, he is unlikely to win.

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 03:53 PM

6. This is part of the reason that farmers in India commit suicide.

They face the uncertainty of natural forces and the marketplace, and cannot afford one additional expense. They are close to the Earth and do the work. It is righteous work from which they gain little or no profit. This did not matter, so long as they were able to stay close to the soil and their land, which they love an revere.

This is not how Monsanto or the absent landlords like the agribusiness giants or Monsanto operate. In the ancient code of life, they are but parasites and thieves, not producers of life.

The gift of seed is that it is meant to grow the next generation. It is a free gift, from God, Nature or the Earth, take your pick. It is something that we all share and it is how we came to be.

To commodify life forms goes against that ancient logic and people are rightfully resisting giving up those rights to others who disrespect their land and labor. Living things should not be slaves to money.

I hope this breaks Monsanto's back.

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Response to freshwest (Reply #6)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 03:55 PM

8. +1. nt.

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Response to freshwest (Reply #6)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 04:29 PM

9. "they are but parasites and thieves, not producers of life."

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Response to freshwest (Reply #6)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 04:53 PM

13. very well said freshwest.....


My uncle still works the farm he grew up on. He, like many others, thought that roundup soybeans were the greatest thing when they first came out. Then as time went by and Monsanto started pulling it's profit margin protecting bullshit, screwing small family farms all over the country, he refused to use any Monsanto product. I've heard stories from him how Monsanto has attacked several people that he knows - Monsanto is pure evil.


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Response to groundloop (Reply #13)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 10:38 PM

15. They've done quite a bit of that. They are burdening society with this, taking advantage.

I'm glad your family was able to hold onto their land and still farm. My family once farmed and always dreamed of buying land and doing it again, but it never happened. For my own part I did a little bit of dry land ranching, but it's a really hard go. The only real profit to me was just being there. It's an experience so many people never get to have, and hard to sustain.

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Response to freshwest (Reply #6)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 11:34 AM

19. "...they are but parasites and thieves, not producers of life."

"The gift of seed is that it is meant to grow the next generation. It is a free gift, from God, Nature or the Earth, take your pick. It is something that we all share and it is how we came to be. "


A beautiful post, freshwest.


I hope this breaks Monsanto's back.

Ditto.



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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 04:31 PM

10. Monsanto is evil

Monsanto sucks.

I saw "Food Inc" and couldn't believe it has come to this in a democracy.

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 04:38 PM

11. I hope we win...

Monsanto needs to go away for the good of everyone.

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 04:38 PM

12. He should plant non-GMO seeds destined for export markets and human consumption.


Pays $2 a bushel more with yields comparable to Roundup Ready variaties and will never need top mess with Monsanto again.


What this farmer is doing is a patent work-around.

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 05:54 PM

14. They've been thru this with Monsanto in India, it's far from pretty.

 

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 12:35 AM

16. Supreme Court "justice" Clarence Thomas is an ex-Monsanto lawyer

 

and does not recuse himself from Monsanto cases which come to the Supreme Court.

http://www.bing.com/search?q=clarence+thomas+monsanto&form=MOZSBR&pc=MOZI

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Response to Fire Walk With Me (Reply #16)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 03:57 AM

18. Yep, he's a crooked bastard. The farmer doesn't stand a chance with this court. nt

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Response to Fire Walk With Me (Reply #16)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 11:35 AM

20. The current Court has a few members that are an embarrassment to the bench.

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 12:54 PM

22. Monsanto getting some richly deserve Karmic kickback

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