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Fri Feb 8, 2013, 08:49 PM

The Timberline Lodge on Mt Hood, Oregon gets about 26 feet of snow a year.

I was a tree thinner with a Forest Service contract (nearly 40 years ago). Our units were close to Mt Hood and the small town of Government Camp. I lived on my unit in a makeshift camp. The locals had warned us not to get caught by the snow. You wouldn't be able to get your truck out until the next year. One morning I woke to find about 6 or 8 inches on the ground, the snow falling fast, quiet and heavy. I took down my camp in a hurry and got out in time. A local scam was to buy a junk car, insure it, and park it in Government Camp. The snow plows would not be able to see them.
The Timberline Lodge is a beautiful structure, built by the CCC (or was it the WPA) in '38. The 26 feet is the total for the year.
The Lodge has an entrance on the second floor for times the snow is deep.

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Reply The Timberline Lodge on Mt Hood, Oregon gets about 26 feet of snow a year. (Original post)
panader0 Feb 2013 OP
liberal N proud Feb 2013 #1
Trajan Feb 2013 #3
Luminous Animal Feb 2013 #7
kestrel91316 Feb 2013 #2
opiate69 Feb 2013 #4
arely staircase Feb 2013 #10
Blue_In_AK Feb 2013 #5
DonRedwood Feb 2013 #8
Blue_In_AK Feb 2013 #9
Berserker Feb 2013 #6
indie9197 Feb 2013 #11
Coyotl Feb 2013 #12
panader0 Feb 2013 #13
Demo_Chris Feb 2013 #14

Response to panader0 (Original post)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 08:51 PM

1. But to hear the media, this storm in the NE is like none other.

They are all having a stormgasm.

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Response to liberal N proud (Reply #1)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 09:17 PM

3. A glacier on Mount Hood is awesome

A glacier on 5th Avenue is horrific ...

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Response to liberal N proud (Reply #1)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 09:45 PM

7. It depends, really, on what a community is prepared for and accustomed to.

Growing up in Michigan in the mostly in the 60s, and in a town with no snowplows for the residential streets, 2 feet meant a lot of digging driveways and walks and those with trucks driving up and down the streets to pack the snow. But when I moved to Delaware in 1972, 2 feet of snow would have shut most of the state down. Even with a few inches, people were fishtailing all about and driving into ditches. Back then, the state and the population simply was not prepared for any kind of snow.

And there is always downed lines and if you're not prepared, you are screwed. In Michigan, we once had to go without electricity for over a month. Since going without electricity was not unusual after a storm, my dad would reconstruct an outdoor wooden ice box in the backyard.

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Response to panader0 (Original post)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 09:03 PM

2. I've been to the Timberline Lodge. That place is the most sturdily built structure I've ever been in

SOLID. For when the avalanches hit it, I suppose.

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Response to panader0 (Original post)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 09:21 PM

4. Isn`t that the lodge used for the exteriors in "The Shining"?

Beautiful building....

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Response to opiate69 (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 10:05 PM

10. yes

eom

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Response to panader0 (Original post)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 09:22 PM

5. Thompson Pass near Valdez, Alaska,

averages 50 feet of snow a season with a record of over 900 inches. The most snowfall in a 24-hour period was over five feet.

Of course, no one lives up there, but people do drive through there on their way from Fairbanks or Anchorage to Valdez.

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Response to Blue_In_AK (Reply #5)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 09:51 PM

8. We drove over that pass in February of 77...it had been closed for months but they got it open

The snow was piled 60+ feet on both sides of the road. It was terrifying. They said no extra noise since anything could set off a collapse. So, you just drove through this little...chasm dug out of the snow. Giant walls towered up above you and leaned in closer and closer to each other.

We thought we were going to die for sure. It collapsed behind us and wasn't open again for months.

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Response to DonRedwood (Reply #8)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 09:58 PM

9. I think they make pretty good efforts to keep it open these days.

But I don't know how. What's really amazing is when you drive through there in June, the snow is almost all gone. We've never driven down there in the winter, just north from Glennallen to Fairbanks. Even that stretch can be kind of harrowing in places.

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Response to panader0 (Original post)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 09:29 PM

6. Sounds like

 

The U.P. of Michigan. You can see homes with doors on the 2nd floor for winter. And double stop signs so when the snow is deep you can still see one.

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Response to panader0 (Original post)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 10:12 PM

11. I hate to brag but Alta ski resort in Utah averages over 40 ft per season

The recent record was 1983-84 when they got 765" which works out to over 63 ft. True it is lighter and fluffier than most places but that is still a lot of snow!

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Response to panader0 (Original post)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 10:17 PM

12. The best bar table in Oregon is up there, viewing the mountain. Window so big

it has as brace for the glass.

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Response to Coyotl (Reply #12)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 10:23 PM

13. Oh yeah

I was only able to afford to drink there once. Tree thinners didn't make a lot of money then.
I liked the massive five or six sided stone fireplace, the mosaics, the stairs and more.

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Response to panader0 (Original post)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 10:59 PM

14. That's a beautiful building

 

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