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Tue Feb 5, 2013, 08:47 PM

I passed a homeless couple on my way to the dentist.

The sat by the side of the road hunched with a hand lettered cardboard sign that read, "COLD AND HUNGRY, PLEASE HELP".

I thought I would stop and give them a $20. I wanted to ask to take a picture of them and their sign. I want to start documenting this in case I can get someone's attention about these people. I then remembered that I had to pay the dentist and I would barely have enough money to pay my rent and buy groceries for the rest of the month after that. I didn't feel it would be right to take their picture without giving them something and, of course, asking their permission.

I have seen many homeless with the same signs with variations of the same message that they are hungry and need help. I know we have services in my town, so I went on line to find where they were. I discovered that the services for medical help, for food, for clothing and for shelter are miles apart. Our public transportation is woefully inadequate and too expensive for people who have nothing. There are soup kitchens in several of the churches, but they are far away from one of the few shelters in the county. There is a shelter for women, but it comes with strings attached like Bibles and lectures. All the services except for the medical clinics (two of them that service all the poor, not just the homeless), are run by churches. Most of the services specialize in whom they help and turn others away that aren't their specialty.

It struck me how awful it has to be to go begging from those religious folks, who give you a meal and a Bible. They can't offer anything else to help these people, who have to travel miles to get other services they need. It has been miserably cold and wet here even though it's California. Many of these folks camp and sleep on the beach when they aren't chased away. There was a notice that our County government had received $300,000 for the year for the homeless so they were going to meet to decide how they were going to allocate the money. Are they kidding? This is so inadequate to address the problem. They are talking about campgrounds. Really, this is the best the County can come up with? Our government has to do better. This can't go on.



I'm disgusted because I have been socially to many of the residences in my area. These people live in palaces. To go to their homes one is unaware that there is a depression going on and thousands of people including children are out in the street. The talk is of the latest restaurant, theater production or art exhibit they have gone to. Charity is about going someplace else like Mexico to do charity work, yet I read that there were enough homeless children in my county to fill one elementary school. This is so disgusting.

Sorry, I just had to rant about this.

57 replies, 3605 views

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Reply I passed a homeless couple on my way to the dentist. (Original post)
Cleita Feb 2013 OP
CaliforniaPeggy Feb 2013 #1
Helen Reddy Feb 2013 #2
Cleita Feb 2013 #3
nadinbrzezinski Feb 2013 #8
Cleita Feb 2013 #12
nadinbrzezinski Feb 2013 #14
Cleita Feb 2013 #17
nadinbrzezinski Feb 2013 #18
Cleita Feb 2013 #20
nadinbrzezinski Feb 2013 #23
Fight2Win Feb 2013 #56
Cleita Feb 2013 #57
CrispyQ Feb 2013 #4
obliviously Feb 2013 #5
Cleita Feb 2013 #6
SammyWinstonJack Feb 2013 #15
nadinbrzezinski Feb 2013 #7
obliviously Feb 2013 #9
Cleita Feb 2013 #10
Beacool Feb 2013 #11
Cleita Feb 2013 #13
Beacool Feb 2013 #21
Cleita Feb 2013 #25
Beacool Feb 2013 #33
Cleita Feb 2013 #35
Beacool Feb 2013 #38
Lady Freedom Returns Feb 2013 #24
Beacool Feb 2013 #37
Demo_Chris Feb 2013 #16
Cleita Feb 2013 #19
Demo_Chris Feb 2013 #41
Cleita Feb 2013 #47
freshwest Feb 2013 #22
Cleita Feb 2013 #27
840high Feb 2013 #43
Cleita Feb 2013 #48
840high Feb 2013 #55
Lady Freedom Returns Feb 2013 #32
Cleita Feb 2013 #36
Lydia Leftcoast Feb 2013 #26
Cleita Feb 2013 #29
Beacool Feb 2013 #40
Lydia Leftcoast Feb 2013 #52
Beacool Feb 2013 #53
Cleita Feb 2013 #54
RiverLover Feb 2013 #28
Cleita Feb 2013 #30
Honeycombe8 Feb 2013 #31
Cleita Feb 2013 #34
lunasun Feb 2013 #39
Lady Freedom Returns Feb 2013 #46
lunasun Feb 2013 #50
Cleita Feb 2013 #51
Beacool Feb 2013 #42
840high Feb 2013 #44
DainBramaged Feb 2013 #45
Cleita Feb 2013 #49

Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 08:53 PM

1. No need to be sorry; this is an excellent rant.

I have no answers, but this much I do know: When you've identified the barriers to the solutions, you have taken a huge first step.

K&R

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 08:55 PM

2. We almost always

 

give a buck or two to a home-free person (thanks Kai), especially women with children. Lately, if I have the time, I'll go and purchase food and bring it back.

Thank you Cleita for your concern for humanity.

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Response to Helen Reddy (Reply #2)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 09:00 PM

3. The problem is we need a better solution than alms.

Good on you for doing what you can and for everyone who does do what they can, but we need better. This homeless situation has been going on since 1980. Our government has to do something better than campgrounds. I think those rich people in big houses can afford a higher property tax to fund a program to end homelessness once and for all.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #3)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:34 PM

8. Pilot program locally, Home Again

Is working better than usual.

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Response to nadinbrzezinski (Reply #8)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:39 PM

12. Do you have any information to link to?

I would like to look at it and then maybe confront the powers that be with what might be done. County Board of Supervisors meeting soon to discuss the homeless. Maybe they needs some blueprints with what to do with their $300,000.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #12)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:51 PM

14. Yup

http://homeagainsd.org/

It is modeled on a pilot program in other places, to the East.

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Response to nadinbrzezinski (Reply #14)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:53 PM

17. Yes, giving people a place to live is a permanent solution or start to one.

I don't see how they are going to do it here with $300,000 for the year. With all the rich people in this County, there has to be a way to squeeze them for taxes to fund this and maybe the oil companies operating here too.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #17)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:55 PM

18. Might I suggest contacting them

It took the people running it time to convince my local leaders that it was worth a try...as in a few years.

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Response to nadinbrzezinski (Reply #18)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:00 PM

20. Yes, I will. I can't contribute but I can attend meetings of

the local governments and voice my concerns, and possible solutions.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #20)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:08 PM

23. For the moment we need to become gnats.



Local paper, progressive, doing a story on local area with a well known homeless population. Our local reporters/residents said it was not true...one reason for those very early photos.

If residents living in a well known locus to PD and social services refuse to see the obvious...

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Response to Cleita (Reply #3)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 03:30 PM

56. the cost of food and gas are driving this poverty

 


We need to focus our efforts demanding an end to speculating on our food by Goldman Sachs, and oil speculation by Koch Brothers. This is killing people literally, and as bad as it is here, the third world is suffering much worse because of our inaction on what is happening on our stock market.

Then we need to force a government program to return the homes that the bankers stole to the people via inexpensive housing.

They are selling those homes back to investors on the cheap, so they can pull a profit. NO!

WE want those inexpensive homes for people, to lift them up, not lift up some investors.

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Response to Fight2Win (Reply #56)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 03:37 PM

57. Yes, that is a big problem. My "up by the bootstraps" conservative

trainer at the gym brought this up about gas prices. I told her it's because of the commodities market and the fact that traders are betting on prices. I said they are gambling and we are paying the price. It was the first time I was able to shut her up on her "heard on Fx'd News" talking points. (btw, I can have a trainer at the gym because my insurance pays for my membership and family pays for the trainer so that I stay healthy and out of their way in case anyone is wondering how I can afford it.)

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 09:52 PM

4. Too many American's don't see the privilege they have in their own lives

& how that impacts their personal economics. They throw around phrases like, 'pull yourself up by your bootstraps,' 'personal responsibility,' & 'level playing field' & they have no idea what the reality of those things really is because they are blinded by privilege.

This is something I have become more aware of in my personal life - the various types of privilege that I have, that I benefit from, that others may not have. It has helped me to be less judgmental.

on edit: I don't know what the answer is. I worry that we will have to have many millions more fall into the abyss before our voices are loud enough to be heard over the money.

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 09:56 PM

5. How much did you spend at the dentist on your grill? NT

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Response to obliviously (Reply #5)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:26 PM

6. Could you be a little clearer?

I don't understand you. What do you mean by grill? It was in excess of $100 for a routine cleaning. Medicare doesn't pay for dental and I'm on Social Security.

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Response to obliviously (Reply #5)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:52 PM

15. ...

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:28 PM

7. I have taken photos.

I like to ask, but at times we don't.

The last we took as for a feature article dealing partly with homelessness.

At times documentation and pointing in right direction, and extra food, gloves, whatever, will help more in the long term.

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Response to nadinbrzezinski (Reply #7)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:34 PM

9. Tuna

you can always send a few cans of tuna.

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Response to nadinbrzezinski (Reply #7)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:37 PM

10. I'm beyond waiting for the long term. I've been waiting since 1980.

About half the homes in this area are between $500,000 and $1,000,000. Those people pay only 1% in property tax. I want the County to try to get 2% to 3% in property taxes. The people, whose homes I have been in, can well afford it. They won't do anything except throw some money to churches and charities that may or may not get services to the people who need them and the services far way below the need and complain about having to look at destitute people in parking lots begging. There are hotels all over the place that have empty rooms. Surely the county and the hotels can work something out if there is enough money to pay for it.

I myself am only a disaster away from homelessness myself. If something happens to my family, who allow me to rent a trailer on their property, I will be joining those people especially if the Prez puts entitlements on the table, as he promised today, to fix the debt ceiling. No one is going to fix this until we make them do it.

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:37 PM

11. I think that you're wrong about churches' aid and prejudiced against them.

My (Lutheran) church is the only church in town who feeds the homeless lunch. No one is forcing religion on anyone. Of course people can come to Sunday service if they wish to, but that's up to them. I don't know what kind of churches you are referring to, but the mainstream churches don't force religion on the homeless. I don't see anything "awful" about going to one of them for a hot meal and a chance to be inside for a few hours.

Furthermore, our lunch program doesn't get any grant money. It costs on a slow day $100 in food to feed an average of 50 people. That money comes from the parishioners. Although we do get some local businesses who donate food regularly.

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Response to Beacool (Reply #11)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:43 PM

13. This is exactly what I'm bitching about. Not that your church reaches out or that any other

church reaches out. It's wonderful that you do and that you care. It's just not enough and too helter skelter. Many people can't get to many of the churches. Only one of the churches in my area that serve meals is accessible to where most of the homeless are and they don't have enough for everyone usually. Otherwise it's a trek over hilly country to get to the other ones in more affluent neighborhoods.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #13)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:03 PM

21. I agree with most of your post, just not your characterization of the aid provided by churches.

BTW, our town also has a homeless shelter where people go at night for dinner and a place to sleep. Aid is easy to access in my town because it's only a square mile and we have plenty of transportation (We are in NJ across the Hudson from Manhattan). I understand that it's harder to access services in other parts of the country.

As for the long term homeless, most of them are not homeless due to the bad economy. These people would have been in the same situation regardless of the economy. The permanently homeless fall generally in 3 categories: the mentally ill, the addicts and the ones who are a combo of both. My elderly neighbor who volunteers daily at the lunch program said that today they had to call the cops. Two of the men started punching each other. What we need is better mental health programs. There have been 3 cases so far this year of mentally ill folks who have pushed people onto the subway tracks. The mentally ill are roaming the streets and many of them are not taking their meds.

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Response to Beacool (Reply #21)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:11 PM

25. Okay, you lost me.

It's their fault in your mind. The reason they fall into those categories is because all the safety nets we once had that took care of dysfunctional people were dismantled by Reagan first in California and then nationwide when he became President. We had no homeless before then. We had hobos and hippies who were social drop outs, but they could drop back in society when they tired of being home free. A majority of the people today, just have fallen on hard times from being jobless or sick. Surely, you don't blame the children who are homeless because they are mentally ill or addicted or the elderly who can't afford the rent and cat food anymore? I'm sorry you have a problem with the nutty ones but they are no less needy than any other homeless person. They more than any need the health services to help them get better.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #25)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:22 PM

33. I'm not talking about families or the elderly, that is not what we see around here.

What we see are the ones who are mentally ill, drug addicted or alcoholics. This group will remain in a precarious condition for the long haul. Other categories of homeless obviously exist, but it's not what we see in our small town. That applies more to larger cities, such as NY. They have many families who are homeless. NY tries to place them in hotels and eventually in low income Apts.

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Response to Beacool (Reply #33)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:25 PM

35. Well, we are seeing families and elderly. Our local newspaper said that

there were enough homeless children in our county to fill an elementary school. Now that's a lot of homeless children in a County that is pretty rural and not densely populated. Those children no doubt have homeless parents or grandparents. It's not a good situation.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #35)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:39 PM

38. It's heartbreaking.

60 Minutes had some segments last year on homeless children. There are so many in Seminole County, FL (same county where Disney World is at) that the Board of Ed now sends school buses to the fleabag motels near the highways. Some of the parents couldn't even afford a motel and were living in their cars. Absolutely appalling that this should occur in the wealthiest nation on earth.

I don't know what's sadder, if to see a hungry child or a hungry elderly person who did everything right and the system still failed them.

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Response to Beacool (Reply #11)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:10 PM

24. Sad to say that some churches do get pushy when it comes to religion.

There are a few out there that say they are a "Church" but really there a cult.

What your church is doing is really great.Not pushing religion is a way for many homeless to know it is OK. I know it sounds strange, but many on the street are scared, very scared, of these cults that masquerade as churches. Many of the ligament churches do get a little pushy and that, due to the cults, scare many homeless.

I hope that you and your church can keep up the great work!

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Response to Lady Freedom Returns (Reply #24)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:34 PM

37. That why I specified that mainstream churches don't push religion to the homeless.

At least not where I live. This is a pretty liberal town. The pastor is available if anyone needs to talk to her, but she's not proselytizing or trying to convert anybody. In my town the homeless shelter is run by the coalition of churches and the synagogue. We only have "regular" churches in town: Catholic, Episcopal, Lutheran (mine) and one synagogue. Since it's an upper income city and very small, we don't have the homeless families or the people who have been left homeless due to the downturn in the economy. That's why I said that the people we aid would have been in the same situation regardless of the economy. They have other problems.

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:52 PM

16. And in the meantime we are passing permanent tax cuts for the rich

 

Because, you know, the folks making $30,000 a month are barely getting by.

There is a huge divide in this country and within our own party. The divide goes beyond wealth, though that gap continues to grow at a staggering pace. Beyond this, there is a gap in UNDERSTANDING. Those doing well are often completely incapable of understanding what's happening to those on the bottom.

My mom, for example, falls into this category. She is without exageration, staggeringly wealthy. By this I mean that between her and her husband they are worth many millions of dollars. She now owns, I believe, three homes, all worth millions of dollars each. She just finished buying a new one -- which she will of course need to completely gut and redesign to her specifications. It's a hobby.

She spends her senior years travelling the world -- probably spending an average or five or six months a year overseas. If you can name the place, and it's unusual enough to be interesting to the monied crowd, she has probably been there or plans to go. Whether it's Russia for two months, Switzerland for three months, or travelling Africa to see the endangered mountain gorillas, she's there. She is on the road so much I no longer even attempt to keep track of her location.

I, on the other hand, am poor. VERY poor. I might well lose my home if something doesn't change. We talk about being poor sometimes. On her last trip to visit I tried again to explain to her the realities of my life. We were talking about healthcare, and I was explaining to her that because I am poor, I don't get to go to the doctors or dentists. That's not something I get to do. She not only did not understand this, she refused to believe it. She refused to believe that there were literally tens of millions of people in this country who cannot go to the doctor when they are sick. That's simply not true she explained, there are programs for this sort of thing. It's really not worth the time trying to explain.

The truth is, she doesn't want to know.

When she dies they plan to give everything to a foundation. Her own grandkids cannot afford college, but they plan to give their millions to a scholarship foundation so that -- and this is a quote -- their names will live on when they are gone. That's what matters to them. Not helping people. They can do that NOW. No, they want to do something when they die that will insure that they are remembered as something they are not: generous caring people.

She's not alone. I would argue that she is TYPICAL of her class.

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Response to Demo_Chris (Reply #16)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:58 PM

19. I know what you are saying. They are blind to the suffering of others

because they really have no worries of the economic kindor of living hand to mouth. I'm sorry it's your mom. She reminds me of someone who was equally clueless and lost her head over her inability to sympathize with the poor, Marie Antoinette.

I really do believe that people like your mom and the Romneys who have more than one home need to pay very high property taxes for the privilege of owning all those extra homes. The taxes can be used to house the poor, IMHO. Oh, bringing back the 90% highest income tax bracket might help too.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #19)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:43 PM

41. Something. It's not just her though. I have seen similar sentiments HERE (nt)

 

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Response to Demo_Chris (Reply #41)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 01:35 AM

47. So have I. eom

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:04 PM

22. I just took someone to the local food bank, where everything is offered in the way of help.

I was amazed to see more services than ever being offered. The city, county and state work together to collect all staples and fresh produce from stores and from individuals. Our city has phone numbers for help, 211 in addition to the standard 411 and 911. The food place is packed all the time, handing out food, places for help for people of all conditions. Some workers are paid, others are volunteers. They help with housing, health care, jobs and education. The senior and disabled shuttle buses go in and out of the parking lot all day. I felt glad to see it.

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Response to freshwest (Reply #22)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:13 PM

27. We have nothing that organized in my area and we should because

it's a very wealthy area.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #27)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:52 PM

43. Well then - make it your

project. Someone has to start.

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Response to 840high (Reply #43)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 01:37 AM

48. Part of the problem is getting people to listen and look.

So many of the well off really believe people are poor and downtrodden because it's their own fault.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #48)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 03:11 PM

55. Shame. I've encountered

the same. You sound like a very decent person. Hug.

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Response to freshwest (Reply #22)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:18 PM

32. The 211 is to go with the new communication programs.

There is a push to get phones to low income and homeless people. It is to make sure they can call for help and to get work.


The sad part is the growing number of people needing help who have a home and work, yet the can not make enough for feeding their families, to afford health care, even to keep the lights on.

Then you have what is called the working homeless. You may be waited on by them at a fast food place or a dept. store. You would never know they are homeless.

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Response to Lady Freedom Returns (Reply #32)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:27 PM

36. The working homeless at least get a paycheck to pay for transportation

and a few other things those who have nothing can't even access. It's wrong though for people not to have a living wage.

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:12 PM

26. When I was in Sweden in 2011, I attended a service at the Anglican Church in Stockholm

which serves English-speaking Church of England and Episcopalian expats, and at coffee hour, one of the members told me that the social safety net there is so strong that there is nothing left for the churches to do. They therefore pair up with churches in Eastern Europe to provide social services.

The Stockholm church pairs up with the Anglican Church in Riga, Latvia, where the end of the Soviet system and the application of the "shock doctrine" meant a loss of the safety net. Their main project is meals and health care for destitute seniors.

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Response to Lydia Leftcoast (Reply #26)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:15 PM

29. Yep, and that's the way it should be here.

I'm sure there are still things Churches can do like maybe help children who are gifted and need special education, stuff that isn't covered with basic social programs.

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Response to Lydia Leftcoast (Reply #26)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:42 PM

40. My understanding is that Sweden doesn't have really poor people.

That the safety net is that good that they don't let people fall through the cracks.

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Response to Beacool (Reply #40)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 12:20 PM

52. It has poor people, but they're not homeless or going without food

There are definitely income disparities, but the kind of grinding poverty that you find in the U.S. just isn't evident.

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Response to Lydia Leftcoast (Reply #52)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 02:09 PM

53. Thanks for the clarification.

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Response to Lydia Leftcoast (Reply #52)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 02:48 PM

54. Actually when I grew up in the forties and fifties, that was the same situation

among white people. Blacks did not have it so good, but they were slowly being mainstreamed into working, middle class existence. Even those who did menial work got minimum wage, which at the time was a living wage. The very poor and unemployed could get welfare, hence the myth of the welfare queen was born. Everyone had a home, even if it was what was called a slum then, like a cold-water, walk up apartment for instance. Not luxurious but at least a place to eat, sleep and keep your possessions.

Remember the Lennon Sisters? Their family was poor and there were twelve children. They lived in a two bedroom house in Venice, California. I'm sure it was crowded but they lived in a house and they didn't go hungry. I knew friends who had gone to high school with them, a Catholic school. When they became famous, then the family's fortunes improved. So we were moving in the direction that even Sweden back then hadn't achieved.

What went wrong?

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:14 PM

28. You are why I love being a Democrat

Cleita, You make us all proud. Thanks for caring about others who could easily be us, given different circumstance. I feel the same way as you, the same utter frustration & feelings of helplessness to change things, way over in North Carolina!! Keep up the good fight~

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Response to RiverLover (Reply #28)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:17 PM

30. Thank you RiverLover and welcome to DU!

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:18 PM

31. To be correct, though--we're not in a depression.

We were in a recession, but that has ended. We are now in a down economy that is slowly recovering.

A depression is a lot LOT worse than what we've seen these past few years.

I don't have an answer for the homelessness. But it seems to me it would take organizations to seriously help. A little here and there gets them by for a day or a few hours, but doesn't provide long term help.

There are also many situations as to why some are homeless. If a person is homeless because of mental problems or alcohol or drug problems, no normal assistance will help. They need professional help the likes of which even middle class people with insurance find hard to get. It's a sad situation.

You should also be aware that some people make a living by begging on street corners. They are not all really hungry and destitute and homeless. There was a news article here several years ago documenting some of the people. One man (who I had given $10 to once) earned about $50,000 a year begging on different street corners in a wheel chair. That was in addition to his disability payments.

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #31)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:23 PM

34. Yes, I'm sure it's a recession for anyone that still has some kind of income

and a home. It's a depression for those who don't and who haven't seen their retirement income rise with the price of things over these last years. There used to be a boon in panhandling, but that was in more affluent times when most people had jobs and a few extra dollars to give to a panhandler. The people I have seen aren't doing the theatrics. They are pale, skinny and beaten looking. That's why I want to take photos. It's very disturbing what I'm seeing. Also, the authorities cut them no slack. They are treated like stray dogs. At least stray dogs will get some shelter.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #34)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:41 PM

39. beaten looking... I know what you mean , these are not grifters if you take the time

to actually look at them or talk to them you can see the damage of the elements and not having a home. Very sad , not the mentally ill either .
The shelters/church kitchen route works best for those living out of a car around these parts
They are homeless but have a car still.
I have seen disabled at shelters too - I dont ask but I thought our system took care of the disabled at least enough to get a room apt..
What safety net?

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Response to lunasun (Reply #39)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 12:02 AM

46. One of the saddest things I saw was where a shelter had to turn women away.

The had two sections. One was Men and the other was women and children.

They had so many women with children in there that women without children had to be turned away. Some of the men had to be turned away too. When word got around on the street we all understood so we all just lined up to get blankets and /or water. We didn't ask about beds, we just waited for them to place a sign in the window saying they had room and what section.

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Response to Lady Freedom Returns (Reply #46)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:50 AM

50. So many children now

I know I posted living in a car is an advantage , but I do understand that means at some point you had to be well off enought to purchase one and then somehow keep and fill it!!!

Sorry for the flippant comment but out here the wear of walking from place to place = an additional burden esp. in winter or with small kids.

Rare is the freewheeling vagabond looking for a place to lay their head for a night before moving on after a night of drink . This is the image many still have of "homeless" .

Many under 30, so many families and women with children . These are every night, no home,not moving on, and in need people in greater numbers every day that overwhelm what very little is available in the area.

Some locations it is a lotto system so no advantage even for getting there early or having children with you

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Response to lunasun (Reply #50)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 12:09 PM

51. This is what people don't get.

Not only do you have to get from place to place and in my area a very hilly terrain, but you are bringing all your belongings with you and in the case of children, their belongings as well.

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #31)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:43 PM

42. What's the joke?

It's a recession when it affects someone else. It's a depression when it affects me.

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Response to Beacool (Reply #42)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:54 PM

44. +100

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Response to Cleita (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:56 PM

45. There have been so many times I have given my last dollar in my pocket to help

someone in need. And me with the one week's salary in drug co-pays a month.........


you do what you can with what you have it all comes back in the end.

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Response to DainBramaged (Reply #45)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 01:43 AM

49. You still have to take care of yourself.

I try to give a few dollars here and there when I can, but I really feel that those who really can give without feeling a pinch don't. Since I put this OP up, a relative of mine came over to show me her new Jimmy Choo shoes, which she found at a store that specializes in used but expensive clothes. The shoes were hardly worn and she got them for a fraction of the original price of $600. She paid $200. I nearly choked on my coffee. I'm sorry there isn't a shoe in the world worth $200 let alone $600.
Mama mia! How many warm sneakers would that money buy for needy children! I said nothing to her. She was so thrilled, but it's really making me feel sad tonight.

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