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Tue Feb 5, 2013, 04:55 PM

Colorado Democratic Rep. Jared Polis: Remove Cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act

http://www.coloradoan.com/viewart/20130204/NEWS11/302040049/Colorado-Rep-Polis-introduces-national-marijuana-bill

Polis’ measure would regulate marijuana the way the federal government handles alcohol: In states that legalize pot, growers would have to obtain a federal permit. Oversight of marijuana would be removed from the Drug Enforcement Administration and given to the newly renamed Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Marijuana and Firearms, and it would remain illegal to bring marijuana from a state where it’s legal to one where it isn’t.

The bill is based on a legalization measure previously pushed by former Reps. Barney Frank of Massachusetts and Ron Paul of Texas.


The legislation created by Frank and Paul was left to die in the office of Texas Republican Representative Leland Howard, who claimed it would never get out of his committee. It didn't. Do not let this happen again. Call your Representative to encourage them to do the correct thing regarding the increasing estrangement between Congress and the American people regarding cannabis' legal status in the US.

It is important to remove cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act because Nixon's organization has created intractable conditions for a plant to meet the standards of a human-manufactured drug. (BTW, Nixon's own commission recommended cannabis not be included in the CSA but Nixon wanted a way to punish his enemies so he ignored the legal and scientific evidence, as has the rest of the Federal govt for the last 40 years.

Democratic Reps. Earl Blumenauer introduced legislation to create a tax structure for cannabis that would be reviewed after two years, and then five, to tax the commercial production of cannabis for both recreational and industrial use.

CO and WA were the tipping point. We're beyond that moment and moving into a major shift in cannabis law in the U.S. Hopefully Congress will not keep itself mired in racist law and will acknowledge the will of the American people sooner rather than later.

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Arrow 18 replies Author Time Post
Reply Colorado Democratic Rep. Jared Polis: Remove Cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act (Original post)
RainDog Feb 2013 OP
msongs Feb 2013 #1
RainDog Feb 2013 #2
valerief Feb 2013 #14
SpartanDem Feb 2013 #18
madokie Feb 2013 #3
farminator3000 Feb 2013 #8
madokie Feb 2013 #13
RainDog Feb 2013 #4
tridim Feb 2013 #6
farminator3000 Feb 2013 #9
RainDog Feb 2013 #5
Warren Stupidity Feb 2013 #7
ananda Feb 2013 #10
farminator3000 Feb 2013 #11
Hard Assets Feb 2013 #12
farminator3000 Feb 2013 #16
farminator3000 Feb 2013 #15
RainDog Feb 2013 #17

Response to RainDog (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:00 PM

1. if u can't grow your own it's a fraud not legalization nt

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Response to msongs (Reply #1)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:01 PM

2. the law regarding cannabis is left to the discretion of the state

states already have frameworks that allow people to grow their own, so this does not change that fact.

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Response to msongs (Reply #1)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 07:37 PM

14. The only way it'll be legal and hassle-free is if rich people get richer off it. Only way. nt

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Response to msongs (Reply #1)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 02:21 AM

18. So Prohibition didn't really end in 1933?

because home brewing didn't become legal until 1978. I'm in favor home growing, it's just if you apply that standard to from alcohol Prohibition, alcohol isn't really legal until the 70's

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Response to RainDog (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:04 PM

3. Even though my lungs won't let me partake for all intents any longer

I'd have to have a toke on this if it does pass

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Response to madokie (Reply #3)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:48 PM

8. your stomach will!

why wait? make some brownies!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/30240578/Adam-Gottlieb-The-Art-and-Science-of-Cooking-With-Cannabis

a classic!

check out the liqueur recipe that takes 1 year+!

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Response to farminator3000 (Reply #8)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 06:42 PM

13. Thanks

When I left VN I ingested a good amount, 1/2 ounce or so of cambodian weed and 24 hours later when we landed in Alaska I was still stoned.

I bookmarked for further study

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Response to RainDog (Reply #4)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:40 PM

6. Sounds pretty good based on the answers.

Home growing is all I care about, well that and the ability to smoke outside without worrying about getting arrested.

A little nitpick, the agency shouldn't be called the ATMF, it should be called the ATCF. Cannabis is the name of the substance, not marijuana. It'd be like using "Wine" for the acronym instead of "Alcohol".

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Response to tridim (Reply #6)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:54 PM

9. Harry Anslinger (notorious a-hole) made up the word 'marihuana' because it sounded 'Mexican'

This paper is intended
to demonstrate how the Federal Bureau of Narcotics's propagation of negative images associating
marijuana with the anti-social behavior of marginal socio-economic groups in the 1930's still
influences the federal government's marijuana policies today.
http://leda.law.harvard.edu/leda/data/352/Ransom.pdf

that's ^^^ like 70 pages, btw.

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Response to RainDog (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:37 PM

5. Marijuana Policy Project Petition to Regulate Cannabis like Alcohol

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Response to RainDog (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:46 PM

7. Commense Sense OutBreak Threat Level: Red. nt.

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Response to RainDog (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:54 PM

10. Hear hear!

..

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Response to RainDog (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:59 PM

11. "Anslingerian" Politics: The History of Anti-Marijuana Sentiment in Federal Law and How Harry" ahole

Anslinger's Anti-Marijuana Politics Continue to Prevent the FDA and Other Medical Experts from
Studying Marijuana's Medical Utility."

Jesse J. Ransom
Harvard Law School
Written Work Requirement.
Final Paper for
Food and Drug Law.
Professor Peter Barton Hutt.
April 20, 1999
http://leda.law.harvard.edu/leda/data/352/Ransom.pdf

70+ pages ^^^

***

also somewhat extensive-

The Report of the National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse
Marihuana: A Signal of Misunderstanding

Commissioned by President Richard M. Nixon, March, 1972
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/library/studies/nc/ncmenu.htm

***

More importantly, Nixon made clear several times that he wanted a report which supported his views and 'tough on crime' policies, no matter what the facts might be. To his credit, Governor Shafer delivered instead an honest report, with conclusions based on all the evidence -- even though at the time he was being considered for a federal judgeship (needless to say, he didn't get it).
http://www.csdp.org/news/news/nixon.htm

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Response to RainDog (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 06:01 PM

12. I'm glad a representative from my state is sponsoring that.

 

I wish I had Polis for my representative, but I live in Denver. DeGette is just as good, and has signed on (I believe).

Do we have the co-sponsor list somewhere?

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Response to Hard Assets (Reply #12)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:24 PM

16. the co-sponsors are on the Q T

for now.

see post #15

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Response to RainDog (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:23 PM

15. K&R + a pdf of the measure + an article

20 pages-
Executive Summary
After decades of failed policies and tremors of varying intensity, the tectonic plates of marijuana regulation abruptly shifted November 2012 as the citizens of Washington and Colorado voted to legalize the drug for personal, recreational use.
Smaller, earlier quakes first began in Oregon in 1973, when the state legislature passed legislation that made the penalty for possession of small amounts of marijuana equivalent to that of a traffic ticket. 1 In the 40 years that followed, 15 jurisdictions have developed similar policies.2

-skip-

Assuming increased legal consumption and reduction in prices, a $50 per ounce tax, for example, would raise estimated revenue of $20 billion annually. 53
Any study of the fiscal impact should also include the savings generated by reduced expenditures on marijuana interdiction and enforcement.
http://blumenauer.house.gov/images/stories/2013/The_Path_Forward.pdf

***


In a report released Tuesday, the congressman laid out a broader, five-part agenda: Removing the federal ban on marijuana and taxing the drug the same way Congress regulates and taxes alcohol; allowing states to offer medical marijuana without federal interference; ending the ban on industrial hemp; eliminating tax and banking barriers that prevent marijuana businesses from operating legally and creating a “Sensible Drug Policy Working Group” in Congress to push the other four ideas.

-skip-

Blumenauer, who was a freshman member of the Oregon state legislature when it voted to decriminalize small amounts of the drug in 1971, said he was confident at least one element of their plan — ending a ban on industrial hemp production — could pass this year. (Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, whose home state of Kentucky would benefit, recently endorsed such a move.) The other elements are mere years away.

-skip-

Blumenauer said the tax could raise $100 billion over the next decade, which would go to paying down the deficit, drug treatment and law enforcement.

-skip-

The two congressman also said they are working with a larger, bipartisan group of around 20 members on marijuana issues, and expect about 12 pieces of legislation to be introduced over the course of the 113th Congress. While neither Blumenauer nor Polis would name names, a spokeswoman for Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) confirmed he was working on similar legislation.

-skip-

The duo also said federal arrests for marijuana possession were still too common, totaling 660,000 in 2011.

“The president when pressed on the issue, famously said he had bigger fish to fry,” Blumenauer said. “The truth is, farther down the federal drug enforcement food chain, there are still people frying these small fish.”
http://www.politico.com/story/2013/02/pot-plan-pols-legalization-on-horizon-87227_Page2.html

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Response to farminator3000 (Reply #15)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:31 PM

17. thanks for the links! n/t

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