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Mon Feb 4, 2013, 10:28 AM

King Richard III, paved over in a parking lot!

Last edited Mon Feb 4, 2013, 01:34 PM - Edit history (1)



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-21063882

Richard III dig: DNA confirms bones are king's

Experts from the University of Leicester said DNA from the bones matched that of descendants of the monarch's family.

Lead archaeologist Richard Buckley, from the University of Leicester, told a press conference to applause: "Beyond reasonable doubt it's Richard."

Richard, killed in battle in 1485, will be reinterred in Leicester Cathedral.

Mr Buckley said the bones had been subjected to "rigorous academic study" and had been carbon dated to a period from 1455-1540.

Dr Jo Appleby, an osteo-archaeologist from the university's School of Archaeology and Ancient History, revealed the bones were of a man in his late 20s or early 30s. Richard was 32 when he died.

His skeleton had suffered 10 injuries, including eight to the skull, at around the time of death. Two of the skull wounds were potentially fatal.


Interesting link on who was King Richard III ...

In pictures: Who was the real Richard III?


http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/0/21261553

35 replies, 2040 views

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Reply King Richard III, paved over in a parking lot! (Original post)
RKP5637 Feb 2013 OP
Siwsan Feb 2013 #1
RKP5637 Feb 2013 #2
whistler162 Feb 2013 #30
frogmarch Feb 2013 #3
Arugula Latte Feb 2013 #4
RKP5637 Feb 2013 #22
Ikonoklast Feb 2013 #5
Blue_Tires Feb 2013 #6
RKP5637 Feb 2013 #14
joeybee12 Feb 2013 #17
truebluegreen Feb 2013 #7
Siwsan Feb 2013 #9
truebluegreen Feb 2013 #10
Siwsan Feb 2013 #11
RKP5637 Feb 2013 #16
truebluegreen Feb 2013 #20
central scrutinizer Feb 2013 #19
SoCalNative Feb 2013 #27
Siwsan Feb 2013 #31
RKP5637 Feb 2013 #15
cali Feb 2013 #8
RKP5637 Feb 2013 #13
ananda Feb 2013 #12
coalition_unwilling Feb 2013 #18
Taverner Feb 2013 #21
Lizzie Poppet Feb 2013 #23
Autumn Feb 2013 #24
RKP5637 Feb 2013 #25
Posteritatis Feb 2013 #28
Autumn Feb 2013 #32
jberryhill Feb 2013 #26
RKP5637 Feb 2013 #29
AnnieBW Feb 2013 #33
KatyMan Feb 2013 #34
RKP5637 Feb 2013 #35

Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:00 AM

1. This isn't the only historical figure to end up buried under a parking lot

John Knox, a leader in the Protestant Reformation and the man who reformed church to Scotland, is buried beneath parking spot #23, behind St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh. I am going to assume that the crypts extend that far, underground, but perhaps I'm just putting a kind spin on the location. There is a plaque in the parking spot.

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Response to Siwsan (Reply #1)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:13 AM

2. Interesting! Thanks!!! n/t

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Response to Siwsan (Reply #1)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 05:36 PM

30. Don't forget Jimmy Hoffa.... maybe

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:15 AM

3. Sorry I didn't see

your thread before I started mine. I'll delete.

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:18 AM

4. This is amazing -- look at the extreme scoliosis:

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Response to Arugula Latte (Reply #4)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 04:21 PM

22. Ouch!!! To say the least! n/t

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:20 AM

5. You are forgetting that the winners get to write history.

And both Shakespeare and More maligned Richard to please the Tudors.

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Response to Ikonoklast (Reply #5)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:24 AM

6. +1

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Response to Ikonoklast (Reply #5)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 01:37 PM

14. Updated title! Thanks!!! n/t

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Response to Ikonoklast (Reply #5)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 01:44 PM

17. Black Adder I got it right...Richard was a saint...

Ever see their take on this?

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:27 AM

7. Major doubt that he was a tyrant...

check out the behavior of the Tudors who ousted him sometime.

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Response to truebluegreen (Reply #7)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:37 AM

9. All of these rulers had blood on their hands

I think the thing that puts Richard in such a notorious category is the death of the two young princes. Although I have no doubt he didn't kill them, himself, I also have no doubt he order the killings. These people were ruthless, and had to be, to gain and hold on to power.

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Response to Siwsan (Reply #9)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:53 AM

10. Check out some more history, it's fascinating.

A place to start might be "The Daughter of Time" by Josephine Tey, a whodunit / modern look at the alleged crimes of Richard III.

Was he as enlightened as the book portrays him? Maybe not, but I bet--on the basis of his actual policies and actions--that he was not the monster that history claims, whereas the Tudors' ruthlessness was well-documented. Smearing and murdering a rival to the throne was right up their alley.

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Response to truebluegreen (Reply #10)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 12:08 PM

11. I'll look for that book. Thanks!

I'm reading "Winter King" by Thomas Penn, about the beginning of the Tudor Dynasty. Very interesting. Henry VII was quite a character. I've read, pretty obsessively, about Henry VIII and his children, and am well aware of their bright and dark sides but this is the first book I've read on Henry VII.

Absolutely fascinating people but I think the only thing that's changed, over the centuries, is that, for the MOST part, the powerful leaders now destroy each other with words instead of swords. But they are just as dangerous, devious and power hungry.

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Response to Siwsan (Reply #11)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 01:40 PM

16. Yep, same thing, different tools, words today ... n/t

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Response to Siwsan (Reply #11)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 03:53 PM

20. I remember back in the 80s ? they held a mock trial in Britain

regarding Richard and the murder of the princes. Haven't been able to locate a link to that, but I did find this, from 1997:

http://www.r3.org/trial/trial2.html

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Response to Siwsan (Reply #9)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 05:28 PM

27. Actually

it would have made more sense that they were killed by Henry VII, as the princes were the ones standing in his way of the throne, not Richard III's.

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Response to SoCalNative (Reply #27)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 05:37 PM

31. No - the young princes father was Richard's brother

Their uncle, Richard, was made their 'protector' and had separated them from their mother and put them into the Tower. They stood in the path of him, not in the path of Henry.

Henry was descended from an entirely tree. His grandfather married the widow of Henry V and his grandmother was descended from the family of Edward III. His claim to the throne was tenuous, at best, and he's more a king by conquest, rather than inheritance.

I believe that Henry was, quite literally, hiding in France under the protection of the Duke of Brittany, when the princes were murdered.

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Response to truebluegreen (Reply #7)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 01:37 PM

15. Updated title! Thanks!!! n/t

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:29 AM

8. spoken by someone who clearly has no interest in history.

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Response to cali (Reply #8)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 01:09 PM

13. Removed tyrant part of title. Thanks! n/t

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 12:11 PM

12. Who was the real Richard III?

Why Laurence Olivier of course. Best performance by an actor I've ever seen, bar none.

Of course, I also believe that Shakespeare's Richard III has very little to do with the real one, and the same with Macbeth and Duncan. But they do make for great drama.

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Response to ananda (Reply #12)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 01:46 PM

18. Ironic his bones were found in a parking lot. "A Rolls, a Rolls, My

 

Kingdom for a Rolls" doesn't have quite the same ring -- a bit too 1%er-ish

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 03:54 PM

21. An HOV lane! My kingdom for an HOV lane!

 

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 04:24 PM

23. Don't it always seem to go...?

See what I did there?

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 04:30 PM

24. The angle of his head looks weird to me.

Interesting historical find.

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Response to Autumn (Reply #24)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 04:35 PM

25. Those were really spooky times to me, I would not have lasted long. I always find

something eerie in it all ... maybe in eons people will look back on these times and find them eerie too.

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Response to Autumn (Reply #24)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 05:31 PM

28. The grave was undersized

They didn't bother to dig one long enough to lay him flat, just took the "eh, good enough" approach when he mostly fit.

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Response to Posteritatis (Reply #28)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 05:41 PM

32. Poor guy got no respect. The Rodney Dangerfield of kings

maybe they will do it right this time.

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 04:47 PM

26. I can't imagine what he owes for parking


Even with recent UK laws to reduce "booting" by private parking operators, the parking business in the UK is pretty aggressive.

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #26)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 05:31 PM

29. WOW!!! They must've found him 'casue of all of the parking tickets due!!! LOL

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 08:12 PM

33. A spot! A spot! My Kingdom for a parking spot!

n/t

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 08:20 PM

34. They paved Richard P

and put up a paaaaarking lot (with apologies to Ms Mitchell!)

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Response to KatyMan (Reply #34)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 08:32 PM

35. I love that song, sooo true!!! n/t

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