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Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:06 PM

70 lbs. down. Now I can rant about obnoxious fitness fanatics.

Last edited Sun Sep 21, 2014, 08:34 AM - Edit history (4)

Everything I have to say now is just as valid (or invalid) as it would have been 70 pounds ago. Before I started seriously working on my weight this past April, however, much of what I have to say would be too easily dismissed as "making excuses" or "defeatism". I had been fit for a very long span of time once before too, however, and I would have said many of the same things back then as I will say now, but when I've tried to say these things during my out-of-shape years, somehow any experience from my past, when I'd been fit and trim for eight years, didn't count.

Hear me now and believe me later, fitness fanatics, your experience of fun and exhilaration in exercise is not universal. Just because you love to "feel the burn" doesn't mean everyone else will (if only they'd give it a chance!). Not everyone who runs gets a "runner's high". Not everyone gets a big thrill out of lifting ten more pounds than they could lift last month (at least not a thrill that it exceeds the pleasure of a pint of Ben & Jerry's). Not everyone will feel like an exercise session is "my special time for myself".

For some of us, exercise and a healthy diet means unpleasant work. Worth the effort, but work. Drudgery even. For me the rewards of diet and exercise are in the results, not, by far, in the process that gets me there.

I'm all for trying to psych yourself up for a big effort, and for a sensible, non-fanatical form of positive thinking. I'm not, however, for the magical quasi-religious version of positive thinking, where people speak as if they're going to bend reality to their will by blowing sunshine out their asses, by the sheer power of determination combined with gross oversimplifications crafted into unctuous motivational slogans.



For example: I personally have to translate "Find something you love to do!" into "Find something you can tolerate". It helps for me to have something I'd rather do even less than my exercise too, so that exercise becomes a break, relatively speaking, from that other thing that's even less appealing. I've run into fitness fanatics so certain that there's a FUN! FUN! exercise option for everyone that if you don't agree there's something fun you'd like to do, then you must (in their eyes) simply be looking for an excuse not to exercise, and you must be deliberately setting yourself up for failure.

The most tolerable exercise I've found so far is walking -- fairly brisk walking, often getting up around an average speed of 4 mph for as long as two hours and change. The trade-off here is that for a given span of time, walking doesn't burn as many calories as jogging or running or many other exercises focused on calorie burning, but at least walking is the closest thing I've found to a pleasurable form of exercise. Walking certainly has its very pleasurable moments, particularly on a nice, sunny day, but it's still more on the side of hard work when you're putting up with bad weather and putting in more than 120 miles per month.

I managed 112 miles of walking in December before the weather got too bad for doing much walking in my favorite park. I've since done a little snowshoeing, but now most of my exercise is on indoor equipment, with a much lower pleasure/drudgery ratio there. I have to rely on the trick of exercise being a way of getting out of doing something I like doing even less, which is where having a gym at work comes in handy. Using the sort-of-elliptical-rider-like-thing at work counts as a break when compared to sitting at my desk. I have an elliptical rider at home, but using it seldom feels like a "break" from relaxing at home, so it's harder to motivate myself to use that conveniently located equipment.

I've wondered how widely applicable the common advice of going to the gym (or doing other exercise) with a friend might be. While I can see how some people might get something out of making exercise more social, it certainly wouldn't help me much. I can hardly be alone in that. Given many people's busy schedules, trying to coordinate exercise time with someone else sounds like a recipe for failure, an opportunity for bad excuses to pop up when your friends aren't available.

Further, I imagine a lot of the people who need to get into shape later in their lives were people like me who weren't in great shape when they were younger, who don't have strong, positive associations with exercise and team sports. Maybe for some of the enthusiastic fitness fanatics out there they find their fitness activities to be a recapturing of joyful memories from their youth. Some of us, however, are trying to get in shape without being reminded of what it was like when we were picked last for teams in gym class.

Some fitness fanatics have an obnoxious, Republican-like "we built that!" sense of their own glorious self-made achievements, one that admits little to no room for luck and fortuitous circumstance.

While I think I have a lot to be proud of in what I've accomplished over the past 9 1/2 months, I'll gladly admit to having some great advantages that certainly aren't due to any particular special virtue of mine.

One of the biggest advantages I have is that I've got a lot more free time than many other people: I work about six miles from home, so I don't use up a lot of my day commuting. I have no children, so I'm not spending time playing taxi driver or sitting through soccer practice. I've got a good paying job that nevertheless seldom keeps me in the office late or follows me home after hours.

When you add in extra time for changing, showering, going to and from the gym on top of 45 minute workouts and two hour walks, I've easily been spending 8-12 hours per week on exercise. I certainly wouldn't blame others for having a hard time trying to make that much time in their lives for getting fit. In fact, it was going from a mostly work-at-home job to a commuting job where I spent 1.5-2.5 hours/day stuck in my car, depending on traffic, that killed my first eight years span of staying fit. Over the course of a year "fuck it, I'm tired!" slowly won out over my commitment to fitness. Even once I was working close to home again, it took years (until just last year, in fact) for me to finally get sick of the weight I'd put on and get started working out again.

Now that weather has reduced my walking time, I've got a great advantage in working at a job that provides free membership to a health club in the same building, and where my boss doesn't mind me taking afternoon workout breaks when my fairly flexible schedule permits.

One dieting advantage I have: I'm not a big fan of heavy helpings of sauces, sandwich spreads and salad dressings. It's no sacrifice at all for me to say "hold the mayo". There's 100 calories or more saved right there by doing something that makes a sandwich taste better to me. I like this dish at Friday's called "Cajun Shrimp and Chicken Pasta", but I ask for 1/4 of the sauce (as well as substituting multigrain pasta and adding extra red bell pepper), and I love it that way. Big puddles of sauce at the bottom of a dish of pasta frankly disgust me. I like just enough sauce to slightly moisten pasta, and that's it.

I cringe to see the amount of salad dressing that many other people drown their salads in. I've decided not to bother with low calories dressings because I can get by with 100 calories or so of bleu cheese on a big salad and be perfectly content.

Another dieting advantage: I seem to be someone who gets a bit of an appetite suppression effect out of exercise. It's not that I'm never resisting cravings, not by far, but I'm seldom racked by hunger pangs either. (Sorry, ladies, from what I've read men are much more likely to benefit from this suppression effect than women.)

I'm doing just fine losing weight without adopting any particularly special or strict diet. No puritanical elimination of this or that, no all-organic, no low-carb, no gluten-free. I'm not spending a lot of time trying to find "superfoods" or other foods with this or that purported fat-burning, immune-boosting effect. I'm simply eating less overall, cutting out a lot of desserts I used to indulge in (but not all of them!), eating more vegetables and a little more fruit, making more of the carbs I eat whole grain, eating lean meats and a little more seafood. I certainly am not freaking out over GMOs, diet soda, or artificial additives. While I think we should all be a bit careful and wary about what goes into our food supply, I certainly do not buy into the hair-on-fire "OMG!111!1!1! TEH CORPORATIONS R FEEDING US POISON!1!!1!" histrionic freak out that's popular on DU.

I used to do the low-fat diet thing, during the first long span of fitness in my life, but this time around I've decided not to worry so much about fat, so long as I favor healthier fats. Not only have I lost a lot of weight this way, but I've got my cholesterol down to 133, with good HDL levels and low triglycerides, all while suffering much less from hunger pangs than I did on the low-fat diet.

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Reply 70 lbs. down. Now I can rant about obnoxious fitness fanatics. (Original post)
Silent3 Feb 2013 OP
XemaSab Feb 2013 #1
Silent3 Feb 2013 #2
elfin Feb 2013 #3
Silent3 Feb 2013 #7
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #110
southernyankeebelle Feb 2013 #37
B Calm Feb 2013 #4
Silent3 Feb 2013 #6
malaise Feb 2013 #5
we can do it Feb 2013 #8
Silent3 Feb 2013 #9
we can do it Feb 2013 #11
Silent3 Feb 2013 #53
diane in sf Feb 2013 #60
Silent3 Feb 2013 #107
we can do it Feb 2013 #113
glowing Feb 2013 #82
we can do it Feb 2013 #114
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #91
we can do it Feb 2013 #115
bhikkhu Feb 2013 #10
eallen Feb 2013 #12
Silent3 Feb 2013 #50
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #111
cantbeserious Feb 2013 #13
nobodyspecial Feb 2013 #14
Silent3 Feb 2013 #15
Hekate Feb 2013 #18
nobodyspecial Feb 2013 #22
liberal_at_heart Feb 2013 #45
October Feb 2013 #98
Hekate Feb 2013 #16
Silent3 Feb 2013 #61
Hekate Feb 2013 #87
trailmonkee Feb 2013 #17
distantearlywarning Feb 2013 #19
kurtzapril4 Feb 2013 #20
Silent3 Feb 2013 #57
kurtzapril4 Feb 2013 #72
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #112
tavernier Feb 2013 #21
Silent3 Feb 2013 #51
tabbycat31 Feb 2013 #141
Silent3 Feb 2013 #142
tabbycat31 Feb 2013 #143
riverbendviewgal Feb 2013 #23
Silent3 Feb 2013 #46
riverbendviewgal Feb 2013 #77
Silent3 Feb 2013 #103
Rosa Luxemburg Feb 2013 #76
1gobluedem Feb 2013 #24
bluestate10 Feb 2013 #25
Silent3 Feb 2013 #36
Apophis Feb 2013 #26
Ian Iam Feb 2013 #27
geckosfeet Feb 2013 #28
teenagebambam Feb 2013 #29
GoneOffShore Feb 2013 #30
Silent3 Feb 2013 #58
MuseRider Feb 2013 #31
arthritisR_US Feb 2013 #32
tjwash Feb 2013 #33
Silent3 Feb 2013 #43
demwing Feb 2013 #34
Silent3 Feb 2013 #42
SheilaT Feb 2013 #35
Silent3 Feb 2013 #41
Saboburns Feb 2013 #38
randome Feb 2013 #39
Silent3 Feb 2013 #40
liberal_at_heart Feb 2013 #83
flvegan Feb 2013 #44
Silent3 Feb 2013 #48
flvegan Feb 2013 #54
Silent3 Feb 2013 #55
flvegan Feb 2013 #56
GaYellowDawg Feb 2013 #84
flvegan Feb 2013 #134
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Silent3 Feb 2013 #136
flvegan Feb 2013 #137
Silent3 Feb 2013 #138
flvegan Feb 2013 #146
Silent3 Feb 2013 #147
Silent3 Feb 2013 #133
liberal_at_heart Feb 2013 #47
Lisa0825 Feb 2013 #49
Yavin4 Feb 2013 #52
donco Feb 2013 #59
ucrdem Feb 2013 #62
Silent3 Feb 2013 #63
ucrdem Feb 2013 #64
tavernier Feb 2013 #65
Silent3 Feb 2013 #68
a kennedy Feb 2013 #66
MineralMan Feb 2013 #67
Silent3 Feb 2013 #69
MineralMan Feb 2013 #70
Phillip McCleod Feb 2013 #71
Silent3 Feb 2013 #73
Phillip McCleod Feb 2013 #81
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #128
Phillip McCleod Feb 2013 #131
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #129
Phillip McCleod Feb 2013 #132
PasadenaTrudy Feb 2013 #74
riverbendviewgal Feb 2013 #80
Silent3 Feb 2013 #96
Moostache Feb 2013 #75
liberal_at_heart Feb 2013 #89
rucky Feb 2013 #78
liberal_at_heart Feb 2013 #79
Silent3 Feb 2013 #85
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Silent3 Feb 2013 #97
Hekate Feb 2013 #88
sarge43 Feb 2013 #93
shireen Feb 2013 #90
Silent3 Feb 2013 #106
NaturalHigh Feb 2013 #92
AtheistCrusader Feb 2013 #94
FailureToCommunicate Feb 2013 #95
HiPointDem Feb 2013 #99
AtheistCrusader Feb 2013 #100
Silent3 Feb 2013 #102
War Horse Feb 2013 #101
Silent3 Feb 2013 #105
War Horse Feb 2013 #121
Historic NY Feb 2013 #104
mythology Feb 2013 #108
Silent3 Feb 2013 #109
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #119
smirkymonkey Feb 2013 #116
Silent3 Feb 2013 #117
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #118
Silent3 Feb 2013 #120
nachosgrande Feb 2013 #122
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #123
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #124
Silent3 Feb 2013 #125
AndyTiedye Feb 2013 #130
high density Feb 2013 #126
Silent3 Feb 2013 #127
magical thyme Feb 2013 #139
sammytko Feb 2013 #140
i am me. i am free. Feb 2013 #144
Silent3 Feb 2013 #145
Silent3 Apr 2013 #148

Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:10 PM

1. Congratulations!

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Response to XemaSab (Reply #1)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:12 PM

2. Thanks. :) n/t

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:16 PM

3. Excellent! And agree about fitness nazis

Walking is the ONLY exercise that doesn't enrage me. And not treadmill. Has to be "real, even if inside somewhere when weather is crap. All the rest make me cranky for some reason.

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Response to elfin (Reply #3)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:47 PM

7. My main aerobic exercise for many years was a stationary bike...

...and I think "enraged" is a good description of the way in made me feel most of the time. I don't know how I managed to put up with it for eight years (well, seven solid years and another spotty year before crapping out on it), because I definitely wasn't having any fun with it.

I'm looking forward to the spring when I can get back to mostly walking. For some reason, however, I don't resent the "ARC trainer" I use at the gym at work so much (it's kind of like an elliptical rider and a stair climber), possibly because I know I'm getting a break from my desk while I'm using it.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #7)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 05:35 AM

110. I'm Pedaling as Hard as I Can, and Not Getting Anywhere

Of course pedaling a stationary bike is maddening. All that effort should produce motion, wind on your face, a change in scenery....

The sensory aspect of exercise is often sorely neglected.


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Response to elfin (Reply #3)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 09:17 PM

37. When I lived overseas I had no problems in losing weight. We walked everywhere.

 

We didn't have time to waste. I didn't feel like I was on a diet. It was great. Now am old and I can't walk much without fearing I'll have a heart attack. I have A-Fib. So I find walking around to get things or go outside to get the mail is what I can do now. I like to go shopping at the super WalMart because I refuse to ride in those mobile chair they have. I will walk around the store. But when we get home my husband carries the stuff in the house and I put everything away. By the time I'm finished I'm done for the day. I have to say I never like to all the weight stuff.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:20 PM

4. I just put in 6 miles on the

treadmill. Proud to say I've lost 40 pounds since October.

I use to say I'm too out of shape to exercise, and it was true!

I went on Atkins and lost the first 20 pounds pretty easy. Once I got a few pounds off I started exercising. Trouble is, my job (truck driving) has me working around 60 hours a week and that leaves little time for exercising.

Hopefully when I retire in April, I'll be able to get to my desired weight and stay that way.

Good job losing weight! I know how damn hard it is!!

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Response to B Calm (Reply #4)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:40 PM

6. I've got a bit of time until I can retire...

...having just turned 50, but I've been thinking that, if I can keep up my good habits until retirement, it should be a lot easier using my free time for exercise when that time comes.

From what I've seen from other people I've known that go on Atkins, I wouldn't treat Atkins as anything but a kick starter. Most of those people have regained all the weight they lost. My personal opinion is that it's better long term to have a more balanced diet, which means some carbs, and to do a decent amount of regular exercise.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:31 PM

5. Congrats

We treat exercise as part of living - one hour four days a week, walking, riding a stationary bike and general stretching/calisthenics . We don't do diets - we just gave up sugar in our coffee/tea permanently and drinks most of the tim; we also don't use white rice and white flour at home but don't obsess if we go to friends' homes and that's what they're serving - we take small servings or ignore it.

We haven't eaten red meat for decades but I still like my stewed chicken or brown stew fish gravy.

Every night we have a little piece of something sweet - we treat chocolate or cookies or icecream the way our parents did - I remember dad bringing home one bar of Cadbury's for all of us. Today people eat that one bar by themselves.


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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:48 PM

8. Good job) also to the others posting, btw.

I have to admit, I am one who finds exercise fun and relaxing (OK- I am an addict. I just don't feel good when I miss doing something physical) . Walking/hiking is cool and has a way of setting your mind free once you get in the groove, especially out in the parks. I do think there is some wisdom in there is something for everyone - I totally enjoy gardening now and can easily lose a whole day and a lot of calories doing it...also what about dance, or actively playing with the kids?

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Response to we can do it (Reply #8)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:56 PM

9. Some of those more enjoyable (for some people) activities...

...aren't serious calorie burners unless you have A LOT of time to put into them.

For those particular examples, I don't have any kids to play with, and I don't like gardening or dancing that much. I have a hard time imagining doing 500 calories worth of dancing everyday.

Given how sweaty I get doing 500 calories of other forms of exercise (I have serious hyperhidrosis -- I seldom see anyone at the gym as soaked in sweat as I am) I'd be spraying my sweat all over the dance floor if I went at it that hard. It wouldn't be pretty!

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #9)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 07:02 PM

11. I can't imagine burning 50 calories dancing, but I have friends who dance for hours!

Have you tried yoga? I started for flexibility mostly, but found it both relaxing and a great workout (I have gotten pretty sweaty a few times and its not hot yoga) Great for focusing and relaxing the mind and harder than I imagined, but you just do what works for you ONLY one day at a time.

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Response to we can do it (Reply #11)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:55 AM

53. It's possible I might like yoga, but it goes against one of my coping strategies...

...which, since I'm not a big fan of exercise in general, is doing things that I can do while mostly being tuned out.

Unless I'm greatly mistaken, yoga would require a lot of concentration on form and technique (at least at first), and I'm afraid I'd likely lose patience and dedication before I got very far with it.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #53)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 03:43 AM

60. I escape while doing yoga by tuning in to my body sensations. For the elliptical

I listen to oldies--my body thinks it's 13-20 again and the time goes by much more quickly.

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Response to diane in sf (Reply #60)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 10:18 PM

107. I'd guess that getting to where you can "escape" that way...

...is hardly automatic, however. You'd have to go through a lot of work learning the moves and techniques first, and that's a hurdle I have a hard time imagining getting over, especially since I've found something that's working for me now.

One trick I've relied on to get as far as I have has been to pick activities that I haven't had to concentrate on very hard at all, where I can simply let my mind wander and go on automatic pilot. I don't think yoga qualifies there -- at least not until you've already been doing it a long time.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #53)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 11:51 AM

113. It does take concentration (I have an teacher for my excellent beginner's class)

You are so busy putting your parts into the right places (or as close to it as you can) time flies - I notice both big and incremental improvement in some areas each time and it always makes me feel peaceful and strong. (I am not patient or quiet in any way normally)

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Response to we can do it (Reply #11)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 01:08 PM

82. I love yoga, I put on a routine on the lap top, have a TV or Kid in the backround and go to town.

I know the whole thing is supposed to be this "relaxing type of stretching workout", but I focus less on "doing it right" with a bit of distraction/ noise in the background... often the kid plops in and starts doing some poses as well. Its funny seeing my little 8yr old boy-child doing downward dog, but its good for him to be limber when he's playing football (he loves football and tennis).

Anyway, yoga doesn't seem like an effort, its just a matter of time management. At the least, I can normally do a quick 30 minute stretch session without too much effort. I prefer, if I'm getting decked out in sport bra and the clothing, to do a longer session, but life doesn't always permit... The biggest reason I do yoga is for the "core" strength and the stretching relief that I get for my lower back and hips (two painful areas). If I miss out on too many days, my lower back will let me know. And it's easy to travel a yoga mat and pull up a yoga routine on my iPhone.

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Response to glowing (Reply #82)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 12:02 PM

114. I totally agree about relief for lower back and hips, that's one reason I started yoga.

I had been overtraining on and off for years and not doing enough stretching and it finally bit me on the butt. I do make a point of at least a few poses at home most days that I don't have my class.

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Response to we can do it (Reply #11)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 03:52 PM

91. Throw Your Body at the Music

I can easily burn off several pounds in a weekend at a trance festival.


Dancing is the best!




Ride the Music!



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Response to AndyTiedye (Reply #91)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 12:04 PM

115. I have no doubt!

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:59 PM

10. Well written, and thanks for the insight!

I am one of those who enjoys exercise, and when the weather is nice for very long, I tend to wind up eventually over-trained and underweight, and to enjoy every minute of it. Cycling is my preferred means, and I love to get out into the country on the open road, and I'm decent enough that I do a little competitive racing. In winter we have lots of snow and ice, so its more gym-time and working in the cold. Nearing 50 its more about keeping fit and keeping up socially with guys whose efforts I admire. My job is pretty physical too, and I do the cooking for my family - keeping everything "close to the farm" and healthy, but no particular diet.

I've always wondered how it is for other people. Most days, I get up thinking "what can I get done today?". At work I do the same - if not immediately busy, I look around to see what can be done, what can be cleaner, what could be better organized; I tend to keep myself and the other guys busy with little projects and improvements. I think its a basic level of mental and physical activity, and a basic enjoyment of mental and physical activity. If I stop its because its the end of the day and I'm tired, and I sleep best if I'm worn out from having gotten stuff done during the day...I think of it as enjoying life (and that's one thing I talk to my teenage daughters about), but I wonder if people who don't enjoy work and exercise have their own different categories of enjoyment?

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 07:11 PM

12. Congratulations. And walking is great!

Walking is easier on the joints than running, and partly because of that, I suspect there are more who keep it up later in life, when health is even more important, and the lack of youthful resilience makes its maintenance more of a challenge. It's good for your back. Personally, I love to walk. But even if for you it's just the most tolerable, that's better than not tolerable.

So keep on truckin'.


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Response to eallen (Reply #12)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:40 AM

50. I've occasionally thrown in a few short bursts of running...

...when I feel inspired, like when a song I'm listening to moves me, or if I notice that I'm getting close to being able to make my 8.25 mile walk in less than two hours if I push myself a bit.

In general, however, since bad knees seem to run in my family, however, I'm trying to be careful not to stress my mine too much.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #50)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 05:37 AM

111. Bicycling is Easier on the Knees than Walking/Running

as long as the bike is set up properly and has low enough gears.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 07:12 PM

13. Good Job - Thanks For Sharing

eom

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 07:31 PM

14. I think you could have made your point without insulting

a large group of people. Congratulations on your success, but I think we all can agree with the fact that some people enjoy exercise while others don't without all of the animosity and insults.

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Response to nobodyspecial (Reply #14)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 07:42 PM

15. I have nothing against people who enjoy exercise.

Far from it. All the more power to them.

My post is about the subset of those people who don't get that other people either aren't just like them, or think that others aren't like them due to some personal deficiency, lack of trying, defeatism, etc.

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Response to nobodyspecial (Reply #14)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 07:50 PM

18. With all due respect, when you've been here for as many years as I have...

... you will come to understand just how flipping judgmental a whole bunch of our dear DUers can be. It doesn't matter what a given poster's personal experience is, for some folks there is no other reality than their own. Illness, organ failure, bad medication, life-altering injury -- none of that is relevant to a fairly large coterie of DUers whose personal experience has not included any of those things.

Stay healthy!

Hekate

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Response to Hekate (Reply #18)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:10 PM

22. And how does being as harsh and judgmental change the tone?

Nazis? Fanatics?

I think the OP made some excellent points. However, when you start off insulting the intended audience, the brain disconnects and the points get lost. You can enlighten, and do a better job at it, without being hostile and judgmental. Why not trying to elevate the conversation instead of bringing it down to the level of those you dislike?

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Response to Hekate (Reply #18)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:31 AM

45. I'm 5'1 and 170 lbs.

I get so freakin tired of hearing all the insults. If I decide to get healthy it will be because I decide to not because someone bullies me into it. Until then I will just ignore all the freakin jerks and just enjoy being myself the way I am.

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Response to nobodyspecial (Reply #14)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 05:18 PM

98. Agree.

A lot of us who love to run or whatever, just do it like everyone else. We all started from the same place of NOT doing it. I only offer encouragement and support if asked. And I've helped a few women friends get started with walk/run programs. But, geez...that was one epic rant here.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 07:44 PM

16. Let me add my heartfelt congratulations and understanding before the fitness nazis show up

Boyoboy do I get it. Cheers to you!

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Response to Hekate (Reply #16)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 08:52 AM

61. Other than one person practically sneering...

...that I must be doing it all wrong if I'd ever eat at a place like Friday's, and one person who mistook my OP as an attack on anyone who happens to enjoy doing exercise, I've been pretty happy with the responses.

The one person who fortunately won't ever see my OP is my right-wing fundy sister, who in no small part was, let us say, an inspiration for the OP.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #61)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 02:41 PM

87. Fantastic

Maybe, just maybe, DU has turned some kind of corner!

Take your inspiration where you find it, is my motto.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 07:49 PM

17. read the whole post... well written, thank you....

Sounds like the makings of a new diet book... The F.T.S. Diet..... With the diet book market being as big as it is and the amount of bad info and drivvle out there? Seriously, you have have you're introduction already written

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 07:52 PM

19. Thanks for sharing, and congratulations on your results!

Nice to read someone's realistic assessment for once, as opposed to all the "bright-siding", "personal responsibility uber alles" nonsense we have to put up with so much in this culture.

I am one of those who actually enjoys exercise and will happily do an hour a day without much complaint, but dieting is always a horrible trial for me. And I am one of the severely hypothyroid unicorns/liars/excuse-makers out there (at least according to the weight Nazis on DU) - must have meds every day or I become extremely ill. So between that and my natural love of all things cake, losing weight is pretty brutally hard for me. Since age 25 (when I developed thyroid disease) I've mostly been one of the "fat fit" with good strength, cardio, BP, cholesterol, etc., but constantly too high on the scale. And I've never managed to love fat-free, no-sugar foods like everyone always claimed would happen if I just dieted enough. Every time I diet I just end up liking cake more than I did before, LOL!

The diet part seems to be the easier part for you. Too bad we can't combine our strengths to make weight loss easier for both of us - I'll exercise and you diet and we'll both get skinny.

Anyway, congrats again, and thanks for sharing!

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:00 PM

20. Congratulations!

I have to admit to being a bit of a sauce addict. I mean, when I make spaghetti, I'll take a half cup of spaghetti and a cup of sauce. I'm not that fond of pasta or rice...I'd rather have more of what goes on them than the pasta or rice. I make a light homemade spaghetti sauce with diced tomatoes, fresh basil, a little oregano and garlic. Then I make a spaghetti squash. I fork the squash out of it's shell, put a lot of sauce on it....and I can have a ton of food for very few calories. I like Ken's or Newman's own lite salad dressings. If I'm eating a full fat version of a creamy dressing, I use the old trick of dipping the first 1/3 of the tines in the salad dressing, then spearing the lettuce. It really helps cutting down on the amount I use. If I eat pizza, I blot the slice...you can easily remove 25-50 calories a slice that way.

I really dislike excercise, too. I find I have to force myself to go, but I do. It is drudgery. I never feel "high" after I do it, I envy people who do!

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Response to kurtzapril4 (Reply #20)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 01:24 AM

57. My biggest exercise high...

...is the relief of stopping.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #57)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 11:02 AM

72. Exactly right! n/t

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #57)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 05:48 AM

112. That Might Change

It did for me.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:04 PM

21. Do you enjoy reading?

My library carries a large selection of audio cd's. I love reading and I bought a small battery cd player with earphones. I save my favorite books for my walks. Great incentive, and it seems to make the time fly by.

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Response to tavernier (Reply #21)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:46 AM

51. So far I've mostly been listening to music

At first I wasn't listening to anything at all. I can get very, very sweaty when I exercise, and in the past I'd found earphones or headphones irritating when I was hot and sweaty.

Growing boredom, however, inspired me to give a new pair of Apple EarPods a try. Those worked well for me, and what was really amazing is that I jumped from an average walking speed of around 3.2 mph up to 3.6. Music really helps me move.

I am thinking of giving audio books a try one of these days, however, or at least some good podcasts.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #51)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 10:52 AM

141. I used to listen to a lot of good podcasts while exercising

However, that's changed as I could never keep up with them. Now it's just music (and my workout music is my 'guilty pleasure' music). Go ahead and punch me or call me a bad DUer if you want to, but right now my choice in workout music is Ke$ha.

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Response to tabbycat31 (Reply #141)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 11:20 AM

142. Sorry, couldn't resist the chance to use this image...



Nothing personal.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #142)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 02:08 PM

143. It's ok

That is inspiring me to change into my gym clothes and go work out

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:18 PM

23. it is the sugar and carbs

That are bad. Not the fat.
Forget the whites.

My son lost 100 lbs doing the above.

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Response to riverbendviewgal (Reply #23)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:31 AM

46. I'm not for demonizing any particular types of food

I think sugar (even <gasp!> a little refined sugar) and carbs are fine in moderation. It's just that "moderation" might mean a lot less if you've been overdoing that stuff.

What makes the most sense to me is balancing calories consumed to calories burned -- or, when trying to lose weight, running a consistent calorie deficit.

Food choices matter, of course, but I look at lot of that as playing around the edges of the central calorie equation, playing with things that might tweak your metabolism a little one way or another, or help you control your appetite so that consuming fewer calories becomes easier to do.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #46)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:15 PM

77. My son met Gary Taubes and thinks that Gary has some good ideas.

The alternative hypothesis — that obesity is a hormonal, regulatory defect — leads to a different prescription. In this paradigm, it is not excess calories that cause obesity, but the quantity and quality of carbohydrates consumed. The carbohydrate content of the diet must be rectified to restore health.

This conclusion is based on endocrinology that has been understood for 50 years: insulin regulates fat accumulation, and blood levels of insulin are effectively determined by carbohydrate intake. The more easily digestible are the carbohydrates we eat (the higher their glycaemic index) and the sweeter they are (the higher their fructose content) the higher are our blood insulin levels, and the more fat accumulates.



http://www.nature.com/news/treat-obesity-as-physiology-not-physics-1.12014

remember frutose IS sugar.
read your cans and bottles my friends...we all have a lot of sugar and carbs in our "good" foods.

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Response to riverbendviewgal (Reply #77)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 09:00 PM

103. While I'd agree with the call for more research...

...and I don't think it will be surprising to find out there are some complicated things about metabolism we don't yet know, it is unlikely in the extreme that human bodies actually violate conservation of mass or energy. If someone is looking there for answers to difficulties with weight loss, that would be getting a bit desperate.

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Response to riverbendviewgal (Reply #23)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:08 PM

76. I ate protein-rich food and cut the sugars

I lost 25lbs. Started to eat sugars again and weight has come back on. I guess I would counteract this if I started running.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:19 PM

24. Congratulations

You should be extremely proud of what you've accomplished.

And I am so with you on the fitness freaks. I have never particularly enjoyed exercise although there was a period in which I did low impact floor aerobics five days a week and loved them.

Then I had to have brain surgery and lost my inner ear, my balance nerve, and the hearing on my left side and my exercise options changed dramatically. Can't do the aerobics because I can't move fast enough or stand on one. Got plantar fasciitis from water aerobics. Treadmill, elliptical, and stair master are out because of balance issues. Have always hated the stationary bike and have never been much of a swimmer. Walking outside is a challenge because of hills. What I love to do is tread water or run in place in the water but it's hard to find a gym where I can do that without getting in the way of the swimmers. I keep hoping, though.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:20 PM

25. I set up an exercise, television room.

I watch television while working out to save time by multi-tasking. The tv helps.

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Response to bluestate10 (Reply #25)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 09:15 PM

36. Yep, when I'm using my elliptical rider at home...

...I've got a TV set up in that room to provide some welcome distraction. Quite often I'm watching Rachel Maddow.

The first elliptical rider we bought turned so creaky and squeaky after a few weeks of heavy use that I could barely hear the TV any more. I would have returned it for a refund if it hadn't been sitting around for two years before I started seriously using it. We had to upgrade to a more expensive model that's very quiet and has thankfully remained so.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:22 PM

26. Congrats!

 

I work out five days a week but I absolutely hate it. It's a chore. I hate getting out of bed to do it. If it wasn't for all the weight I lost, I would've quit working out long ago.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:32 PM

27. Agreed

 

And DURec!

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:36 PM

28. I go low carb healthy fat. Works like magic.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:36 PM

29. I've lost 55 lbs.

I go to the gym ONLY to look at cute guys and to burn enough calories to cancel out cocktail hour.

That said, I really enjoy biking. I live a mile from the C&O Canal Trail and could easily ride 30 miles a day (but don't ask me to hike, walk, or run. Those kill my knees and my self-esteem)

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:40 PM

30. Good rant!

The only way I'm able to maintain my weight is virtually no processed foods and cooking 90% of the meals we eat.

That being said, I know it's difficult for many people to do that. And it can be outside of a lot of budgets.

But, once one learns to cook, that's a game changer. It's like learning to fish.

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Response to GoneOffShore (Reply #30)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 01:51 AM

58. I've managed to do something that I know a lot of the "experts" would recommend against...

...and that's losing all this weight and eating pretty healthy* while eating out most of the time. Neither my wife nor I are big fans of cooking.

Breakfast is about the only thing I usually eat at home, and that's not home cooked either -- it's typically a 6 oz. Greek yogurt and a protein or granola bar (the kind of bar I'd guess many people would dismiss as a glorified candy bar).

Lunch is usually at the cafeteria at work. A typical lunch is a big salad from the salad bar and a grilled cheese sandwich, or maybe a grilled chicken wrap with a tiny bit of honey mustard, some baked potato chips, and an apple.

Dinner is a matter of carefully choosing from the options available at many restaurants, and requesting modifications to reduce calories or otherwise improve the nutritional value of the food -- dressings on the side, less sauce, holding the mayo, substituting whole grain pasta, etc.

*Healthy as measured by the success of my weight loss, and the great results from my last physical exam. Healthy as measured by reasonably well-established science, but not necessarily according to the latest diet fads, advice from self-appointed diet gurus, or according to people who are deeply suspicious of all things that aren't 100% organic, 100% "natural", non-GMO, and "free" of a long list of demonized foods, ingredients, and other substances (like gluten).

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:45 PM

31. Hooray for you!

Wonderful. I agree, it is a chore for me. I hate sweating unless I am playing tennis or working outside in the garden or with the horses. Blech. I have been ill all winter. My husband had a major heart surgery after a little over a year of real scary, horrible problems. It seems as soon as his rehab got him going well, better than ever really I got pneumonia. Not just pneumonia but a really nasty case. Usually steroids are not indicated but the coughing was so bad I was put on a long long course of them. Once my chest x ray cleared, 2 months later I was allowed to start to live again. In 3 weeks I got a horrible case of pertussis. More meds, more rest. I gained about 30 pounds and I am a small person so it is really bad on me. Right now I am so out of breath when I walk I can hardly stand it but in the last week have made enough difference that my jeans are not cutting my stomach in half. it is going to take me a huge effort to get this off.

Weights I like OK but I hate the rest of it. It is a chore and I detest anyone trying to make me do this stuff and admit it is good for me. I know it is but I hate it!

Going from vegetarian to vegan for a while. It should help although I am not certain I care to maintain that.

Wishing you continued good luck and strength to do what is needed for your health. Your post just inspired me as I sit here gasping after walking in from the kitchen. I will do it even if I don't like it!

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:53 PM

32. Congrats and good on ya!

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:58 PM

33. Thumbs up



And agree...most fitness fanatics are like jocks that never outgrew the high school pecking order.

Congrats on the weight loss! I just dropped 10 pounds, and it is not easy in the least. I'll be pulling for you!

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Response to tjwash (Reply #33)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:20 AM

43. Good luck to you too. :) n/t

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 08:59 PM

34. You are an inspiration

as if I needed anything more than the extra inches and pounds (but I apparently do)!

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Response to demwing (Reply #34)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:20 AM

42. One thing that "inspired" me was a new scale my wife bought

I hadn't weighed myself in a while, and when I got on that new scale I was shocked by what I saw: 270 lbs.

As it turns out, the scale needed to be calibrated. After that, however, it still said 263, which was bad enough. I think the 270, however, even if it was a false reading, added a little extra shock value to help get me going.

I'm six feet tall, with a broad-shouldered build, and weight tends to distribute itself fairly evenly around my body, so up to a point I can get away with packing on the pounds without the end result looking too bad. That's sort of a blessing and a curse, since it takes a bit of gain before I look too fat, but twice now in my life that temporary illusion has lulled me into letting things get a bit out of hand before I took action.

The new scale was important in another way: Our previous scale was flaky enough that you could stand on it, get one weight, get off, get back on, and then get another weight that was typically 2-3 lbs different, even as much as 5 lbs different. That made it hard to notice anything but really big changes in weight. The new scale was a lot more consistent, and being able to track my progress day to day really has helped me.

I know some people don't like using scales at all, others say to only weigh once per week, but for me tracking daily progress has been a very useful motivational and strategic tool.

Even without the new scale, however, I think I was on the edge of finally get my act together again. I was starting to get where my knees were bothering me a lot, and I found myself wanting to lean on furniture and push off in order to stand up, or lean on furniture to lower myself down more carefully. That was making me feel way too old too soon!

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 09:08 PM

35. Thank you.

Perhaps you should write a book, because this is a subject near and dear to me.

I need to lose weight, although for me 40 pounds would make me wondrously svelte. I also hate to exercise, although in decent weather I find I can get out every day and walk anywhere from one half mile to a mile and a half in my neighborhood (I've clocked the distances on my car) and I actually enjoy it.

I also am amazingly flexible, despite the excess weight and my age, 64. Hold on. I'll touch my toes and do a headstand. There, are you suitably impressed? I hope so.

I likewise despise the exercise Nazis. I also think there's something wrong with the "EVERYONE MUST EXERCISE LIKE THIS" exhortations that we hear from them. I am in suitable awe of those who do sport (I have a 25 year old son who plays ultimate frisbee, and my, is he in good shape!. The other son the 30 year old, runs an occasional 5k.) but it's not something we all have to do.

There's also the tyranny of various other sorts, such as gluten. Not long ago an acquaintance of mine expressed the opinion that of course everyone was gluten intolerant. Excuse me? Not all of us. And I suspect I am not quite the only person in North America who can still happily consume gluten.

In the end, what matters is that we all pay attention to our bodies. As they are. As they need to be. Exercise appropriately. Eat what makes sense. Live a full life. In the end, we all die. What comes after is currently a matter of faith, no matter that I personally have very strong beliefs about that. None of us get off this planet alive, and while we are here we must live our lives to the fullest.

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Response to SheilaT (Reply #35)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:00 AM

41. Flexibility is something for me to work on

Forget about touching my toes, touching below my knees is a bit of a challenge! I've been like that all my life -- very tight hamstrings.

I've also got a Catch-22 with back problems, problems that should hopefully improve with some stretching and core strength exercises, but most of those kinds of exercises don't work well with my bad back. I need to carefully work up to a better condition doing some special exercises I got from a physical therapist, but my discipline has been lacking there in keeping up with those.

Once I get to my target weight (in another ten pounds) I'll trade off some of the time I've been spending doing aerobic exercise for getting through those therapy exercises, and then do a bit more strength training than the minor amount I've been doing so far.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 09:25 PM

38. My fitness levels depends solely on me. I like that.

I get out of it exactly what I put into it. What could be better than that, or fairer? I've found that my fitness is a thre legged deal. Exercise, diet, and rest. I get my strength, lower BP, increased lean muscle mass from the gym. My body, size and shape, comes from my diet. And rest is just as important as the other two.

I've been a fatass 305 lber, and a very fit 205 lber in the past ten years. The difference in my life is nearly indescribable. Good fitness is the best thing you can do for yourself. Long walks are my favorite activity, my mind frees itself, I'm able to ponder many things, makes my back feel so improved, and makes me happy.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 09:30 PM

39. Once you've made progress, you really don't need to expend as much effort to stay that way.

And there are many who DO get the advantages of staying healthy but they would never have done so if they hadn't been 'pushed' into it.

A little push for all of us to see things differently is generally good.

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Response to randome (Reply #39)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 11:50 PM

40. I remember maintaining with less than I'm doing now...

...but I was younger then too, so I'm figuring when I reach my target weight (about another 10 pounds) I'll be able to ease up some, but perhaps not quite as much as before.

Or work out just as hard, and eat a little more.

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Response to randome (Reply #39)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 01:14 PM

83. being inspired is much better than being pushed

If you're dealing with someone who is overweight because of food addictions and self esteem issues pushing them can cause them to eat more, gain more, hate themselves more and the viscous cycle just continues. For me eating healthy and exercising are a lot like religion. It is a very personal decision that no one can make for someone else. It has to come from within. There has to be a desire within the person to want to do it. And when they do, they will do it. They may ask for help, but that is much different than having help shoved down your throat when you're not asking for it.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:26 AM

44. Congrats, broad brush aside.

I hope your nutritionist is up to date.

Oh wait, that can't be, as you eat at "Friday's" regularly it seems. But then, lots of "I" in this post.

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Response to flvegan (Reply #44)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:34 AM

48. Thank you...

...for coming along to play the snooty fanatic to good illustrative effect.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #48)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:58 AM

54. Prove up your claim.

Definitions being what they are.

You've made an accusation. Back it up.

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Response to flvegan (Reply #54)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 01:02 AM

55. I'm not even sure which "claim" you're referring to.

I'm more sure that finding out what you're whining about would be a waste of my time anyway.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #55)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 01:09 AM

56. Emotion.

So candidly funny in your response.

Hey, at least you got "you're" right.

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Response to flvegan (Reply #56)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 01:56 PM

84. Silent3 is right.

The proof you requested is the text of your initial reply. The comment about eating at "Fridays" was certainly snooty; e.g., disdainful, etc. As far as "fanatic" goes, that's defined as "marked by excessive enthusiasm and often intense uncritical devotion," which certainly characterizes either your attitude towards food/nutrition; any cursory examination of your posts on the topic demonstrates that you are completely intolerant of anyone's views other than your own when it comes to that topic.

When someone loses 70 pounds, that's something to be celebrated, not something to be used as an opportunity to get a cheap crack in. I know you've got your own little set of groupies on DU who think you're completely wonderful, and perhaps that makes you feel like anything you post is just grand. Unfortunately, this time, your reply made you look both small-minded and completely unlikeable. If you didn't like the OP personally, you could have just moved along, but you took the time to take a cheap shot - then took the time to follow up with a couple of more replies because someone dared criticize you and your ego just couldn't stand it. Here's a hint, flvegan: if you don't like being called the equivalent of an asshole, then don't be an asshole.

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Response to GaYellowDawg (Reply #84)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 01:08 AM

134. Groupies? Did you read the OP?

I like that you have many opinions. So personal and emotional, so ready to attack my "attitude towards food/nutrition"

Let me know when you know anything about it. AND you should go back and read the OP about the OP's problem with "obnoxious fitness fanatics"

I'd alert on the personal attack if it wasn't so funny on your behalf. Check yourself on your last statement.

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Response to flvegan (Reply #134)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 01:43 PM

135. Yes, I read the OP.

I sympathized with a great deal of it. There are a lot of us for whom exercise/fitness is miserable and painful. We don't need pep talks or sermons. We just want to be left alone to make our own decisions.

My reply to you wasn't laced with much emotion at all. It pretty much laid out the ways in which you acted as a "snooty fanatic." Much more observational than emotional. I've been on DU long enough to have a very good feel for you and your attitudes; you are not exactly a shrinking violet. If you took offense at the "obnoxious fitness fanatics" - well, there's an old saying down South: a kicked dog squeals.

Alert away. There's worse posted and tolerated on DU every minute. I'm confident that most jurors who read the thread would agree with the last statement and snort at your "check"; after all, I'm not the one who jumped on the poster with a snide little taunt.

And the "funny" comment? Please. If you thought it was funny, you'd chuckle and move on. Contemptuous laughter does not work as a rhetorical device when it is so obviously contrived.

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Response to GaYellowDawg (Reply #135)

Sat Feb 16, 2013, 11:29 PM

136. Occasionally I find it hard to respond to a post without expressing amusement...

...(and perhaps, rarely, nothing but amusement) at that post.

There are some posters, however, for whom it's standard operating procedure in nearly every posted disagreement to theatrically demonstrate, "Hah! Observe how very amused I am at your foolishness, which I am so far above!"

Particularly obnoxious versions of that kind of poster use this a lot:

It's a easy way for them to avoid having to make their own case and defend their own positions.

Thank you again for your contributions to this thread.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #136)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 01:11 AM

137. Didn't you have something to say about fitness folks being obnoxious?

It was a broad brush statement that you seem to have taken in.

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Response to flvegan (Reply #137)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 08:46 AM

138. No, I said something about fitness fanatics who are obnoxious...

...not that all fitness fanatics are obnoxious. If you can't grasp that distinction, I can't help you.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #138)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 11:34 PM

146. You should re-read your OP.

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Response to flvegan (Reply #146)

Mon Feb 18, 2013, 11:41 PM

147. I'm fine with what I said in my OP, especially given that I called it a "rant".

One should expect a little bluster and exaggeration for theatrical effect when someone introduces a post as a rant by their own admission.

Further, besides not calling all fitness fanatics obnoxious, just referring to those who are obnoxious as such, I also never said that all people with an interest in fitness are fanatics about it, just in case the use of the word "fanatic" itself is also bothering you.

On the other hand, if you read the OP in such a way that the kind of person who would sneer condescendingly at the mention of another person eating at Friday's might take offense at my words, then please, point out the particular words that have this dire effect so that I can go back and edit my post... to put those words in a bold font for emphasis.

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Response to flvegan (Reply #44)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 12:11 AM

133. Glucose 108, cholesterol 133...

...with 51 for HDL, 72 for triglycerides.

I just stumbled across my blood work numbers from my last physical in October and thought about this old thread, numbers from when I was "only" down by 50 lbs, when my doctor suggested I lose 15 lbs more (which I've already outdone).

He's not "my" nutritionist, or anyone's nutritionist, but this general practitioner thought I was doing pretty damn well, he congratulated me for making more progress than most of his other patients manage, and the numbers on my blood work back that up. Only one number out of 45, for chloride, at 108, one point above the preferred 98-107 mmol/L range, was amiss, with everything else good or great, and my doctor didn't think that one number was much of anything to worry about.

But what does he know? He's probably just a shill for Big Pharma, and can't be trusted.

And yes, I've been eating at <gasp!> Friday's about once per week, and plenty of other chain restaurants you'd likely look down your nose at, like Ruby Tuesday, Uno, Long Horn, even Burger King now and again, not to mention the cafeteria at work, a local restaurant called T-Bones, and other places that don't serve all-organic, meat-free, wheat-free, guaranteed non-GMO food.

Somehow I'm doing OK with all of that chemical-laden industrial frankenfood. I guess I'm just incredibly lucky, or don't know how much hugely better I could be doing if I avoided that kind of "poison". I must have a dozen tumors and other grave disabilities and ailments all lurking within me, waiting to tear me down while people like you, of course, live 150 years running marathons daily right up until the end.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:33 AM

47. Congratulations! You did it for you and that is the way it should be!

Last edited Sun Feb 3, 2013, 01:33 AM - Edit history (2)

You are the kind of person who truly inspires, not the bullies. In fact you have been such an inspiration for me tonight, I'm going to go eat a banana and I haven't had a piece of fruit in months, and I just went out in my garage and jumped rope for a few minutes. I've almost caught my breath. Thank you for being a true inspiration and for being human like the rest of us.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:38 AM

49. Great post! I have not found a way to make exercise anything other than work to me.

I wish it were different, but I keep doing it anyway.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:51 AM

52. One of THE Best Posts That I Have Ever Read on DU!!

At the gym I go to, it's more of a social scene than a gym. People go there to see and be seen. It makes it difficult for me to get into a pattern of exercising because I have to wade through the crowds of people standing around and chit chatting with their trainers or talking to their friends instead of actually working.

I either have to get up early in the morning or go to the gym late at night. I can never work out right after work because it's packed with people who want to text their friends while they sit on a machine.

Like you, the gym for me is work. It's not fun. It's hard, unpleasant work, and I get frustrated and angry when I cannot find a spot to stretch out because someone is talking about their stupid lives with their trainer while sitting on the mats.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 02:05 AM

59. What ever cranks your moter

now i'm off to do my five sets of five hundred pound squats.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 09:01 AM

62. Congrats Silent3.

Some great tips here. Keep at it brother and consider starting a health newsletter or column as you have enough here for a slim book!

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Response to ucrdem (Reply #62)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 09:17 AM

63. Maybe this would be on the cover :)

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #63)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 09:23 AM

64. aww...

cute kitty!

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 09:54 AM

65. FYI maintenance (from someone there...)

When I lost my fifty, I discovered the other mountain called "MAINTENANCE", often steeper than the first. After a few failed tries, I learned a very important lesson: DO NOT allow yourself to buy one piece of clothing in a larger size. (I'm assuming that you are throwing or giving away your bigger sizes as you lose the weight so there is not the temptation to put on "comfortable" pants.) As the weight starts to creep back on (hey, it was a long time friend that got used to the plushy living accommodations in your warm and fat body, trust me, it will try to move back in), DO NOT even consider just one size larger, even if the waist band cuts in to your flesh, and all the buttons pop off. Those will be your signals to get your walking shoes back on your feet and throw the Cheetos in the trash.



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Response to tavernier (Reply #65)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 10:07 AM

68. I've been burning those clothing bridges behind me.

I have saved one pair of 40" waist jeans, however, to do an "after" picture. I'm down to 32" now, so those old jeans aren't "comfortable" anymore, they're tent-like.

I'm fairly confident of my ability to maintain since I'd managed one stretch of nearly eight years once before, and this time around, even though I'm still not a rah-rah enthusiast, I find the walking I'm doing a lot more tolerable (and even occasionally enjoyable) than the grudgingly used stationary bike that I somehow managed to stick with all those years.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 10:04 AM

66. Thank you for this.......

there IS hope for me.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 10:05 AM

67. Pretty much all fanatics are obnoxious, really.

Except to other fanatics about the same things. The easiest course is to ignore them altogether.

Congrats on your weight loss. It's not an easy thing to do.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #67)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 10:15 AM

69. There are some fantatics I don't mind too much.

As long as their fanaticism is mainly enthusiasm for what they're doing, and not so much poorly justified belief that they've discovered the magic secrets of dieting and fitness (or whatever else the subject might be), and so long as they don't become judgmental about others who don't live up to questionable standards, or become grossly puffed up on their own achievement.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #69)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 10:17 AM

70. Right. Fanatics who don't tell everyone else that they should

do what the fanatics do aren't so bad. They can still be boring, but not quite obnoxious.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 10:39 AM

71. junior high gym class was traumatizing thanks to bullies

 

the smell of a locker room still makes me wretch. i still can't stand jocks. seeing an individual in athletic wear makes me respect them less, involuntarily. i'd frankly rather die than go to a gym.

so i practice martial arts. you can do it anywhere, no gym or gear or clothing needed. just a few warm ups and practice patterns provides a tremendous full-body aerobic workout that also limbers you up.

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Response to Phillip McCleod (Reply #71)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 11:08 AM

73. It wasn't until I'd lost about 30 lbs. that I went back into the health club...

...I had joined years ago. I was doing a lot of walking and some working out on my elliptical rider at home before that, but then decided it was time to add a little weight training.

High school (and junior high) gym classes are a pretty bad memory for me too, more humiliation than outright bullying. That makes gyms and locker rooms less than my favorite places, but I don't think it was as traumatic for me as you've unfortunately experienced.

I sweat so much that I've got to wear different clothing for exercise most of the time, although that usually just means gym shorts and a T-shirt, so it's not terribly specialized gear.

Perhaps this is a bit shallow of me, but I have to admit that I find it easier to go to the gym now that, even though I'm a good way away from being a jock, I am generally on the fitter side of the people I run into there.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #73)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:52 PM

81. i'm definitely not dismissing gyms for anyone else

 

i hope it didn't seem that way. i admit i'd be more disciplined about my practice if there was a studio and instructor in my area that i liked the way i did my first martial arts instructor (tae kwon do). for some reason those locker rooms smell different to me. maybe because i stopped getting bullied only after i started practicing. being a weakling teenage boy is stoopid. you have do stoopid things to keep from going down the tubes. no wonder our society is so gender-warped.

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Response to Phillip McCleod (Reply #81)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 02:38 AM

128. Many of Us Have Had Severe Aversive Conditioning to Gyms and Exercise

…during "Phys Ed" class, where our lack of physical ability was put on display for everyone.
I have never had a membership in a gym, and it is highly unlikely that I ever will,
unless the gym installs a dance floor and a sound system.

This is my gym


and this

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Response to AndyTiedye (Reply #128)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 07:32 PM

131. nice. looks like a couple rainbow gatherings i've been to.

 

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Response to Phillip McCleod (Reply #81)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 03:29 AM

129. Martial Arts Wasn't On the Menu When I Was Growing Up

It wasn't an option for me (which it wouldn't have been anyway, due to my terrible coordination and slow reflexes)
and it wasn't an option for the other kids either (thank the FSM!).

Now it's ubiquitous. Do you ever have to deal with bullies that have the same training you have (or better)?

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Response to AndyTiedye (Reply #129)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 07:36 PM

132. well i'm 40 now.

 

so bullies are less of a problem and my skills at dealing with them have improved too but your point is well-taken. that's the problem with bullies is that they're so effing stupid the only thing they understand is being stood up to. fortunately i've found that one doesn't have to actually win to win. it's no fun to them if the victim fights back with any spirit at all. spoils the whole 'joke'.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 11:13 AM

74. I hate exercise...

and it hates me. I suffer from CFS and fibromyalgia and arthritis etc. I walk around the block and I'm wiped out. I can never build up a tolerance either. Now I just walk my dog in the park and try to enjoy nature. I don't care about living to an old age, I just want to get through each day without too much hassle...

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Response to PasadenaTrudy (Reply #74)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:23 PM

80. Interesting piece in NYT today about arthritis.

You may find this informative. I too have arthritis and weight gain. I lost 40 lbs 4 years ago but put it back on, after going off my no carbs and no sugar diet. I also had fbromyalgia which went away after losing the weight.

I am going back on the no carbs diet (max 20 a day ) and no sugar except in fruits.

here is an excerpt of the NYT

Walker is a social worker and massage therapist who works with cancer patients at NorthShore University HealthSystem outside Chicago. When Shane’s rheumatologist presented methotrexate or steroid injections as the only choices, she was horrified. Because she worked in the integrative medicine department — a combination of alternative and conventional treatments — she knew there were other things to try. She dug into medical-literature databases. She learned about a centuries-old, anti-inflammatory Chinese concoction called four-marvels powder from a visiting naturopath. And she sought guidance from her colleague, Dr. Leslie Mendoza Temple, the head of the hospital’s integrative medicine program, who, while wary of the risks, had been comfortable giving Walker’s program a three-month trial. “I tried everything that I knew was safe to see what would work,” Walker told me.

I grabbed my pen and paper and started taking notes. No gluten. No dairy. No refined sugar. No nightshades, a group of plants that includes potatoes and tomatoes, which are thought by some to be potentially inflammatory, as is sugar. Every day, Shane took a probiotic. Plus two tablespoons of sour Montmorency cherry juice and at least 2,000 milligrams of omega-3’s from fish oil, known for their anti-inflammatory properties. Instead of naproxen, Shane took a combination of ibuprofen and Tylenol to lower his overall intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, which can be hard on the gut. And a quarter teaspoon, daily, of the four-marvels powder.

Walker said she believed that her son’s arthritis was caused by something I had never heard of before — leaky-gut syndrome, a concept that has been accepted in alternative circles for years despite a name that asks you not to take it seriously. The idea is that inflammation in the gut causes the tight junctions between the cells that make up the intestinal lining to loosen. Then, like a lax bouncer, the barrier starts letting through undesirables, various proteins or bacteria that would normally be rebuffed; they then leak into surrounding tissues. The uninvited guests, the hypothesis goes, then trigger an offensive by the body, which uses inflammation to try to get rid of them. That sustained inflammatory response characterizes autoimmune disease.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/03/magazine/the-boy-with-a-thorn-in-his-joints.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20130203&_r=0&pagewanted=all

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Response to riverbendviewgal (Reply #80)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 05:02 PM

96. It's good in a way that diet can treat things like that...

...but I'm happier not to have such sensitivities myself, so I don't have to be so incredibly selective about what I eat, ending up shut out from so many of the foods plenty of people around me are enjoying.

Also, I think there can be some common false, questionable, or misleading interpretations of stories like this:

(1) That if some people have terrible problems eating X, then X is probably bad for everyone to a lesser degree. Let's just consider X bad, bad, BAD.

(2) You stopped eating A, B, C, D, E and F all at once, and you got better. A, B, C, D, E and F must ALL be bad for you. (When it might just be E, or A and D you truly have to worry about, but you end up being afraid to risk any part of the magic formula which has helped you, or it's just to daunting a process to test all of the possible permutations and combinations.

When effects (1) and (2) get combined in some people's minds, I think it can end up leading to a lot of people torturing themselves with totally unnecessarily restrictive diets.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:05 PM

75. Thank you for your thoughts on this...

As someone who has piled on nearly 80-pounds in the last 4 years (lost job in '09 and had to take a night shift position 6 months after having cancer surgery - thankfully 4+ years cancer free) I find it good to hear from someone other than the usual suspects - the fitness nazis, the snakeoil salesmen, the diet-o-century clan.

I hope to find the motivation to drop the pounds, but truth be told I have no intention of losing weight for any of the traditional "reasons"...unless and until I find a personal reason that sticks, I am not going to go through the motions of convincing everyone around me that "I AM SERIOUS THIS TIME.." while personally KNOWING deep down that its just not true. Lying to yourself is the most hateful thing any of us can do, so I have no intention of doing so.

I have a similar history with smoking. I smoked cigarettes every day of my life from 16 to 37 years old. Never ONCE did I "try" to quit. No patches. No hypnosis. No placebos. No failed "attempts". Not one. Not ever. Then I had a bout of food poisoning that led to an emergency room visit (thought I was possibly having an appendicitis) and an abdominal scan that revealed a small tumor on my right kidney. Within seconds I was a former smoker. Have not had a single puff in the 4+ years since. Still WANT one every so often...but life gave me the reason to stop and a second chance to make it happen.

I tell myself all the time that I should lose the weight. I am frustrated that my clothing does not fit like it used to and that I avoid looking at myself or being photographed (Garbo has NOTHING on me in THAT category) for the last few years. But I simply know in my heart that I am not willing to change my life to change the result. I work 60 hours a week while everyone I love is asleep. I spend my weekends in a semi-zombie state trying to force myself awake to have what little time with my family that I can squeeze in. I'll be damned if I am going to make myself even MORE of a pain in the ass to be around by constantly feeling hungry or guilty or both. I have sacrificed the last 4 years to avoid moving my family out of the area they know as "home" and I am working on getting a new position that will be less stress and better hours, even if it means giving up the chase for the corner office and bigger bonus once and for all.

I'll get there. I hope it is before I have a heart attack or stroke or something else, but if my experience with cigarettes is any indication, I am probably out of luck there. I used to be thin and relatively in shape. I'm neither now and won't be for quite some time either. But I know this for a fact - no amount of external input is going to make me change one bit or lose one ounce. Those who feel that haranguing heavier people with "you can do it / you should do it / you NEED to do it" messages are doing more harm than good. I am quite sure that the guy who weighs 155 and wears a 32" waist and bounds around with nervous energy and constant motion DOES feel better when exercising and burning off excess calories. That's great for him, but its not my reality and it means about as much to me as watching Tom and Jerry would in the context of learning conflict resolution.

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Response to Moostache (Reply #75)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 02:44 PM

89. wow. You've had some hardship in your life. I'm sorry.

I'm not going to give you one stitch of advice. Just wanted to say I know what you are going through. I'm a stress eater and a sugar addict and I have an anxiety disorder. Between the anxiety disorder, the stress of life, and the comfort I get from eating sugar, it is hard. I have come to accept myself for who I am flaws and all. There are times when I just get fed up and scared what will happen to me if I don't get healthy, so I lose 10 or 15 lbs. It usually gets put right back on when the next bought of anxiety and stress binge hit. It goes in cycles for me. Right now I think I am at that point where I would like to lose 10 or 15 lbs but I have no illusions that I will somehow turn over a new leaf and never eat sugar again or gain weight again.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:15 PM

78. This is the first weight-loss story that's ever come close to motivating me

thank you for your well-articulated honesty

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Response to rucky (Reply #78)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:23 PM

79. I know. Me too.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 02:10 PM

85. Since I got a much more enthusiastic response to this post than I expected...

...here's a picture to show where I am at in this process. Sorry for the goofy expression on my face. I can't help it when I know someone's taking a picture of me.



I'd like to think this isn't too shabby for having just turned 50 a few months ago.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #85)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 02:33 PM

86. Wow. That's great. Congratulations.

Because of your post I went and jumped rope in my garage last night. This morning a had a healthy breakfast and have not had any refined sugar yet today. My weight fluctuates and I can usually tell when I'm at the point when it is time to lose a few pounds. Painful knees are usually my first sign, so I've known for a few months that I should lose a few pounds but just haven't done it yet. Your post was the trigger I needed to go ahead and do it. Thank you. You are an inspiration. Bullies don't motivate me, but you sure did.

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Response to liberal_at_heart (Reply #86)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 05:09 PM

97. Funny that you should mention knees...

...because I think if the shock of getting on that new scale hadn't done it for me, my knees going wonky were going to push me over the edge soon anyway.

When I got to the 50 lbs. down mark, I went into a sporting goods store and picked up two 25-lb. weights, just to get the sensation of carrying the same weight I'd finally lost. I was amazed at the extra pressure I felt on my knees and the soles of my feet, and it made me very happy to know I was then relieving myself of all that extra stress on my joints.

This past week I tried the same thing at the gym at work with two 35-lb. weights, and that was even more... well, both gratifying and terrifying at the same time.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #85)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 02:42 PM

88. Congratulations and admirations

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #85)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 03:59 PM

93. Lookin' good.

Congratulations for your significant achievement.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 03:14 PM

90. you're an inspiration

It's really hard for me to lose weight. Eating is a form of comfort for me. I'm sick of people who tell me that exercise will make me feel better because it DOES NOT.

People like you give me hope. Thank you for your post.

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Response to shireen (Reply #90)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 09:41 PM

106. There's the issue of whether the exercise makes you feel better while you're doing it...

...and whether it makes you feel better in the long term, between the times you're doing it.

There aren't any guarantees for either of those things, but the latter is at least more likely. The question for any of us who have a hard time getting through the exercise itself is whether the tradeoff will be worth it.

What some of the fanatics don't get is how close a call this can be for some people, they get so much pleasure out of both the process and the results they can't conceive of how hard it might be for other people.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 03:54 PM

92. Congratulations.

Dropping seventy pounds is an impressive accomplishment.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 04:14 PM

94. A lot of low fat foods compensate by adding sugar.

Especially fat-free milk. Look at the ingredients. Sugar.

Yeah, ok, it's 'fat free', joy, my body is perfectly capable of converting sugar into fat.

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Response to AtheistCrusader (Reply #94)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 04:58 PM

95. Try "Truvia" the 'natural' substitute for sugar. I have cut (added) sugar completely and

it seems to be working!

Stevia is another name for the stuff, I believe.

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Response to AtheistCrusader (Reply #94)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 05:27 PM

99. fat free milk doesn't have added sugar. it's just that when you take out the fat, lactose becomes

 

a greater percentage of the content.

nearly everything edible has some 'sugar' in it, & i'm talking about completely natural foods.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #99)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 06:29 PM

100. Crap, I fell for an urban legend.

Thanks for pointing that out.

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Response to AtheistCrusader (Reply #94)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 08:08 PM

102. I think the demonizing of sugar (especially refined) has to be taken with a grain of salt...

...so to speak.

I can understand that there could be an important biological difference between getting sudden blood sugar spikes vs. having a slower release (the glycemic index thing), but if it's healthy to eat a bit of fruit and other "natural" sources of sugar, I think it's a bit extreme to treat added or refined sugar as if it's this totally different beast, like it's a contaminant or a poison in practically any quantity.

This comment is aside from what was said in another response -- you can certainly get fat-free milk that doesn't have added sugar. Not true, of course, of many other low-fat and fat-free products.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 06:46 PM

101. Heartfelt rec and congrats

from someone whose raison d'ętre basially *is* adding extra weight to the barbell, "feeling the burn" and stuff like that. Pure cardio still is, and will probably always remain, "work" for me, though, something I will never enjoy but have to put myself through

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Response to War Horse (Reply #101)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 09:03 PM

105. In a way it's good that part of what you do is hard for you...

...because that way it's easier for you to understand what it must be like for people who can't find much pleasure in any of it.

Of course, it would be great if you and I and everyone else could enjoy all of it instead.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #105)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 06:04 PM

121. You are right about that :)

Two of my best friends are actually marathon runners.

One even travels all over the US and Europe regularly just to run.

I think she's totally nuts. If only she'd be normal like me, and learn to appreciate the pump after a drop set in the bench press, or the joy of a PR in the dead lift.

People are weird, aren't they?

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 09:00 PM

104. I'm trying to get back into the routine ...

gained about 40lbs back of the 125 I lost...5 yrs ago, its tougher my at rest pulse is in the low 40's so that doesn't help my metabolism is slow. I still manage 4.5 miles on most days but bad leg (nerve pain) is getting the best of me.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 10:28 PM

108. I'm lucky

I enjoy working out. I mix it up in that I do martial arts, gymnastics, biking and I've picked up parkour.

The martial arts, gymnastics and parkour kind of feed on each other in terms of having a fair amount of overlap. Biking I've done less frequently lately because I've had my evenings more taken up, but I want to get back in the habit.

I just enjoy the feeling of sweating (which is good because I sweat a lot), and that feeling of being really sore after pushing myself. But the only people I give grief about not being at a workout are those who train as much as I do. But I also have the benefit of not having kids or a significant other and a body that is often in pain, but rarely injured so I can mostly train as often as I want. I think it also helps that I can be rather competitive about keeping up and so I will push harder if those around me do.

But I don't begrudge those who don't work out. It's hard, people are busy, it's bloody cold out, I hate the idea of going to a gym too, I really struggle with trying to eat correctly and taking the proper time to recover and ice just adds more into what needs to be done.

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Response to mythology (Reply #108)

Sun Feb 3, 2013, 10:57 PM

109. I've often wondered if their isn't a certain amount of masochism...

...in some enthusiasts.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #109)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 03:46 PM

119. That Whole "Burn" thing is Sheer Masochism

If one has the ability to make pleasure out of pain, this certainly is a good use for it.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 09:27 PM

116. Congrats on your weight loss!

Good for you! I so related to your experience w/ exercise. Thank you for voicing it. I also hate exercise for excesses sake. I used to absolutely love to ski, but I blew out my knee a number of times and am now limited as to what I can do physically. I like to walk. I absolutely hate the gym.

I only like walking outside even though my company also has an onsite health club (very cheap). I don't mind the machines or yoga, but I hate everything else. I am glad to see that I am not the only one.

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Response to smirkymonkey (Reply #116)

Mon Feb 4, 2013, 10:16 PM

117. I can cope with the machine in the gym for a while...

...knowing that it's mostly to bridge the gap until the weather gets better. I did manage to get in 16.5 miles over the weekend -- a bit cold out there, but still a nice change to be outside again, and I didn't have to deal with too much slippery ice on the trails.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #117)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 03:38 PM

118. Do You have a Woodstove or Fireplace?

Splitting firewood is one of my favorite wintertime exercises.
Far more satisfying than anything the gym has to offer.

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Response to AndyTiedye (Reply #118)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 05:17 PM

120. Since we have a gas fireplace...

...I wonder how many calories I could burn by fracking?

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 07:01 PM

122. Some thoughts...

First of all, a sincere congrats on your weight loss. I'm glad you've found the discipline to make the healthy lifestyle changes to lose the weight. And I agree with you that exercise can seem barely tolerable (or intolerable) when you're first starting out and your body hasn't adapted, or when you're engaged in physical activity that is otherwise unstimulating (for instance, eliptical or treadmill running).

Having said that, I believe your post is making excuses for people not to exercise. The crux of your argument, which I touched on above, is that exercise can and will always be an unenjoyable or even intolerable activity for many people. I tend to think (barring some sort of physical ailment like arthritis or some other extraordinary disability/disease/injury) that this is baloney. When you first take up any strenuous physical activity it is going to suck/hurt/whatever because your body has not adapted to handle the stress being placed upon it. Your body/brain is basically telling you that you're insane and that you are going to kill yourself. The key (for myself and many other friends/family members etc.) is to just acknowledge that regular strenuous exercise is going to be miserable for a good two to three months before it moves into the tolerable zone. And that at some point during the tolerable zone, especially if you can get up to doing 30-60 minute strenous aerobic workouts, your body will adapt to the activity and you will actually start to enjoy it and look forward to the mental and physical benefits that a good workout provides. I tried for many years to lose weight, but it wasn't until I committed myself to regularly working out, regardless of how much it sucked, that I was able to drop 60 pounds. (That was six years ago and I've kept it all off) Once I was truly in shape, exercise (whether it be lifting weights, running, playing pickup basketball, hiking, kayaking etc) became "fun."

The other excuse you make is that all of the other responsibilities of life make it unreasonable to find time to exercise. I agree that's certainly possible for people who are truly stressed - single parents, working multiple jobs, long commutes, etc. But my guess is that the vast majority of Americans can easily find 30-60 minutes a day for a quick run, bike ride or some yoga that are otherwise wasted watching TV or surfing the Net. My wife and I both work and go to school full-time while raising a 3 year old (with no outside financial support), and we both managed to find the time to successfully train for and complete a marathon this past fall. And no, we do not have a nanny nor are we financially well off.

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Response to nachosgrande (Reply #122)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:09 PM

123. Your Mileage May Vary

The crux of your argument, which I touched on above, is that exercise can and will always be an unenjoyable or even intolerable activity for many people. I tend to think (barring some sort of physical ailment like arthritis or some other extraordinary disability/disease/injury) that this is baloney. When you first take up any strenuous physical activity it is going to suck/hurt/whatever because your body has not adapted to handle the stress being placed upon it. Your body/brain is basically telling you that you're insane and that you are going to kill yourself. The key (for myself and many other friends/family members etc.) is to just acknowledge that regular strenuous exercise is going to be miserable for a good two to three months before it moves into the tolerable zone. And that at some point during the tolerable zone, especially if you can get up to doing 30-60 minute strenous aerobic workouts, your body will adapt to the activity and you will actually start to enjoy it and look forward to the mental and physical benefits that a good workout provides.


Just because it worked that way for YOU means it works that way for everyone????
Do you prefer your baloney on rye or whole wheat?

The OP indicated that he had been at it for 9 1/2 months, and for considerably longer than that in the past, and had not observed any such thing.

I do enjoy it now, but it has taken many years, not a few months, to get to this point.

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Response to nachosgrande (Reply #122)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 10:12 PM

124. Gyms Take the Fun Out of Exercise

exercise can seem barely tolerable (or intolerable) when you're first starting out and your body hasn't adapted, or when you're engaged in physical activity that is otherwise unstimulating (for instance, eliptical or treadmill running).


It almost seems as if the whole purpose of a gym is to make exercise as unstimulating as possible. Why do they do this?
If I were running a gym it would look more like a rave. It would have a dance floor pumping 24x7!

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Response to nachosgrande (Reply #122)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:00 PM

125. I've already done a span of eight years before this...

...where I worked off 70 lbs. in about a year, then kept it off for around seven.

And I'm afraid to say it was pretty much just grueling, unappealing work that whole time. It never became fun for me. I think what you're saying is a mistake that many "fanatics" make. They assume what happened to them, their experience, is "how it works". If they went from hating it to loving it, then everyone else will go from hating it to loving it -- if only they give it a try.

I can attest from my experience that your experience is not universal, and cannot be counted upon. I realized that some people might take my OP as providing excuses, but I intended it more as a way to brace people for something that might turn out to be the truth for them -- they might have to, like I did, accept that their rewards might only be in the results, but not the process. I wanted others to know it was possible to push through it anyway, and if they weren't having a great time at it, it wasn't just them.

On the more positive side, I can say that all the walking I've been doing this time around has been a great improvement over the chief form of exercise I used the first time, which was a stationery exercise bike. Far more tolerable, and even occasionally enjoyable, where the bike was pure drudgery.

I mentioned the stuff about the time I have available to admit that I have an advantage there. It's of course a good idea to make the time no matter what, but I personally can't claim credit for being the sort of person who could do that.

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Response to Silent3 (Reply #125)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 03:46 AM

130. Have You Tried a Mountain Bike?

On the more positive side, I can say that all the walking I've been doing this time around has been a great improvement over the chief form of exercise I used the first time, which was a stationery exercise bike. Far more tolerable, and even occasionally enjoyable, where the bike was pure drudgery.


I like to ride my mountain bike on the trails around here (see pic upthread). More intense exercise and yet easier on the knees
(assuming proper bike setup). I get to see a lot more riding than I would walking. This worked so well for me because even
before my body would produce the nice neurotransmitters, I still had the beautiful scenery to look at.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:33 PM

126. I've lost a lot as well, almost 100lbs, though it has been over more than half a decade

Essentially I have found my diet is the biggest contributor. Even now I am still shocked at some of the calories I am blindly eating... It says 140 calories, but there were supposedly 3.5 servings here in this little bag, so that's really 490 calories. I thought we were supposed to have serving sizes that made sense on these labels? No way am I going to sit down with a bag of gummy bears and eat only 28.5% of the bag each sitting. (Gummy bears are the final sugary thing I have yet to give up. I really need to find another snack.)

I walk at least 45 minutes a day at about 4mph which is enough to get my heart pumping a bit (up hills) but my legs haven't burned doing this in years. It's probably time to transition to jogging but I haven't made that leap yet. I do find walking enjoyable, though it took a while for it to get to this point with routes that I find interesting. (It didn't help when I was very fat and people driving by cruelly yelled insults at me while I was trying to exercise. I live in a college neighborhood.) Winter doesn't make it easy but luckily the past couple of years ice has been at a minimum. I have figured out how to plan routes accommodating the wind, which has been the biggest problem recently. I hate the idea of a gym and exercising around a bunch of fit strangers, so I would like to avoid that.

So bottom line is that cholesterol and blood pressure are normal without drugs, I feel good, and some women actually check me out now.

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Response to high density (Reply #126)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 12:06 AM

127. Good job!

I'd say it's been about even between diet and exercise for what's been important for me.

I had a few good eating habits to build on (I tried to make sure I ate some fresh veggies most of the time, I kept the sauces and fatty spreads to a minimum), but still treated myself to too many deserts and snacks and fried foods. Improving my diet alone would have gotten me going, but not nearly as fast as with all of the exercise I've done at the same time.

For the first 50 lbs. I lost, which I lost at a fairly steady 2 lbs/week, I'd say nearly half was directly attributable to calories burned during exercise -- I've been burning 3500-4000 calories/week. And I've been fortunate to get some appetite suppression effect out of exercise too, so it's been less of a struggle to reduce the amount I eat.

A lot of my diet control comes from avoiding situations that require control -- like now I only rarely go to my favorite Mexican restaurant, something that used to be a weekly event, because it's waaaay too easy to inhale many, many tasty, fresh hot tortilla chips that are provided endlessly for free. I've decided I'd rather just splurge a bit on rare occasion than go there more often, but while torturing myself by trying to stop at tiny servings of chips.

I've mixed in little spurts of jogging with my walking at times, but as long as I'm still losing weight (or holding at my goal, in another 10 lbs) I'm not planning to say to myself, "Hey, this walking is too easy now. That must mean I've got to push myself until I'm struggling again!".

If easy does the job, I'll settle for easy.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 10:16 AM

139. Congratulations and excellent Rant!

I can state that the *only* reason I get enough exercise is my 2 dogs walk fast and much of the time it's easier to jog with them then be dragged down the road. So dog-lovers with large dogs have a big leg up right there. And my horse at home requires daily stall mucking, heavy lifting and 6+ months of riding. These are the *only* two "exercise programs" that I honestly enjoy.

Secondly, I got turned onto a nonfad diet program that doesn't feel like dieting, that some times *is* fun to experiment with cooking (but not all the time) and usually tastes and feels good.

Otherwise, at this point in my life I'd be perfectly content to sit on my butt listening to the radio, surfing the 'net, downing cheetos and dreaming, because that's more fun than most of my realities and definitely more fun than *any* exercise program.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 10:21 AM

140. Agree 100% with everything you said! N/t

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)


Response to i am me. i am free. (Reply #144)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 03:22 PM

145. I did eight miles of snowshoeing this weekend...

...and I "appreciated" being outdoors to the extent that it was a relief from the monotony of an indoor elliptical rider, but the winter weather still has plenty of minuses too.

I tried snowshoeing right after the last big storm -- that was brutal, too unpleasant to be an invigorating "challenge" in my book. By yesterday, however, the snow and ice still made the trails in the park crappy for walking in sneakers or boots, but had already melted through to patches of mud that aren't great for snowshoes. While I intend to continue doing some snowshoeing as an alternative form of exercise until the spring, the windows of opportunity for what I'd call good conditions are narrow.

My nose always runs as soon as cold air hits my sinuses too.

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Response to Silent3 (Original post)

Tue Apr 16, 2013, 08:46 AM

148. Shameless bump to crow about reaching 80 lbs. gone :)

I did it! I've reached my initial goal from a year and six days ago: E-I-G-H-T-Y 80 pounds, gone!

On the not-to-be-taken-too-strictly BMI scale, I've now reached the upper edge of "normal"/"healthy" with a BMI of 24.9. I started with a BMI of 35.7, the low end of "Obese Class II (severely obese)".

Given that some people have told me they think I might already be too skinny, I've probably been in a weight range that's healthy for my own body type for a few weeks now, however, and I probably wasn't any worse than moderately obese (which is bad enough) to begin with.

Now that I've reached my initial goal, I'm going to shoot for losing just a little bit more, aim for the 175 lbs that I weighed through much of the 90s. After that, I'll concentrate on building up more muscle, and I'll be happy long term maintaining anything under 190 as long as I'm going up in weight more because of muscle than fat.

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