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Fri Feb 1, 2013, 04:56 PM

Hello, DUers! Your Friday Afternoon Challenge awaits with “The Masterful Details.”

Identify these incomparable works that are made so beautiful by their detail and style...

And without cheating, please...

1.


2.


3.


4.


5.


6.

66 replies, 3723 views

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Arrow 66 replies Author Time Post
Reply Hello, DUers! Your Friday Afternoon Challenge awaits with “The Masterful Details.” (Original post)
CTyankee Feb 2013 OP
Kingofalldems Feb 2013 #1
CTyankee Feb 2013 #2
blue neen Feb 2013 #3
CTyankee Feb 2013 #5
Squinch Feb 2013 #4
CTyankee Feb 2013 #6
Squinch Feb 2013 #7
CTyankee Feb 2013 #8
Squinch Feb 2013 #10
democrat in Tallahassee Feb 2013 #11
CTyankee Feb 2013 #12
oldhippie Feb 2013 #16
CTyankee Feb 2013 #20
reteachinwi Feb 2013 #23
democrat in Tallahassee Feb 2013 #17
CTyankee Feb 2013 #18
CTyankee Feb 2013 #19
CTyankee Feb 2013 #14
joeybee12 Feb 2013 #9
CTyankee Feb 2013 #13
joeybee12 Feb 2013 #15
CTyankee Feb 2013 #21
DevonRex Feb 2013 #40
CTyankee Feb 2013 #43
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #22
reteachinwi Feb 2013 #24
DevonRex Feb 2013 #25
CTyankee Feb 2013 #36
CTyankee Feb 2013 #28
greyl Feb 2013 #31
CTyankee Feb 2013 #33
reteachinwi Feb 2013 #51
pkdu Feb 2013 #26
DevonRex Feb 2013 #27
CTyankee Feb 2013 #29
DevonRex Feb 2013 #37
CTyankee Feb 2013 #39
DevonRex Feb 2013 #42
CTyankee Feb 2013 #44
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #46
CTyankee Feb 2013 #48
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #52
CTyankee Feb 2013 #54
longship Feb 2013 #30
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #32
CTyankee Feb 2013 #35
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #41
CTyankee Feb 2013 #45
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #47
pinboy3niner Feb 2013 #34
CTyankee Feb 2013 #38
Kurovski Feb 2013 #49
CTyankee Feb 2013 #50
Kurovski Feb 2013 #53
CTyankee Feb 2013 #55
DevonRex Feb 2013 #66
CTyankee Feb 2013 #56
Kurovski Feb 2013 #57
CTyankee Feb 2013 #59
Kurovski Feb 2013 #58
CTyankee Feb 2013 #60
Kurovski Feb 2013 #61
Kurovski Feb 2013 #62
CTyankee Feb 2013 #64
Kurovski Feb 2013 #63
CTyankee Feb 2013 #65

Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:14 PM

1. Kick this one.

Even though I haven't a clue.

#1 looks like a UFO zapping a building.

That's all I have.

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Response to Kingofalldems (Reply #1)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:17 PM

2. from a few hundred years ago...!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:23 PM

3. Geez, I love these threads, but.....

......always afraid to guess!

Is #2 something by Michelangelo?

Also, I have no idea what #3 is, but it is absolutely amazing.

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Response to blue neen (Reply #3)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:31 PM

5. Not Michelangelo...but I can see why you thought it...

#3 IS pretty amazing...it's one of things that just makes your jaw drop...

glad you like the Challenge! And I'm glad you are here!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:31 PM

4. I'm thinking the columns are from St. Peter's Basilica.

Is the dog Van Gogh? And a wild stab that the peacock is from some thing by DaVinci.

That's all I got. Such as it is.

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Response to Squinch (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:32 PM

6. ahhh, no, not van gogh...

and the peacock is from another artist, not Leonardo...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #6)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:33 PM

7. Oh, shoot. But I tried.

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Response to Squinch (Reply #7)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:35 PM

8. OK, but think harder about your first guess...do you have a name, title, ??

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #8)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:38 PM

10. For the columns in the Basilica? I don't.

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Response to Squinch (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:42 PM

11. Bernini's Baldachinno

The columns are Bernini's at St. Peter's Basilica

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Response to democrat in Tallahassee (Reply #11)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:48 PM

12. Hey! Terrific and many thanks to Squinch who got the locale!

Man, that thing is something! Have you seen it?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #12)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:55 PM

16. I saw them (the columns) in 2008 ...

 

... but I didn't know what I was looking at at the time. That happened a lot!

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Response to oldhippie (Reply #16)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 06:14 PM

20. wasn't it fabulous, though?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #20)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 09:22 PM

23. Rats, I'm late

 

Mom and I watched Christmas service from EWTN one Christmas. She's been to the Vatican and remarked how she thought the pillars were too weird, and didn't like them. The music was good however.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #12)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:55 PM

17. I teach Humanities

So maybe that is cheating. I saw the enormous thing and the fact that it doesn't even look that large inside St. Peter's is a testament to the enormity of the Basilica. The baldacchino is 92 feet tall and sits under Michelangelo's dome; it is just about my favorite piece of sculpture.

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Response to democrat in Tallahassee (Reply #17)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:58 PM

18. When I saw it in 2006 I just stood there, blinking...couldn't believe it...so massive...

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Response to democrat in Tallahassee (Reply #17)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 06:01 PM

19. So you'd prolly know the bees were a reference to the Barbieri family of which the pope was

one, Maffei Barbieri...

I don't think being a Humanities professor makes you a cheater! There is a way to really cheat, but I just ask people not to. I hope they don't. The real fun is chasing this stuff down and learning new things along the way...

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Response to democrat in Tallahassee (Reply #11)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:50 PM

14. was it the acanthus or the bees?

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:36 PM

9. A wild guess on 6...

Renoir?

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Response to joeybee12 (Reply #9)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:49 PM

13. Looks like Renoir, doesn't it...but no...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #13)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:53 PM

15. I can see him putting in that kind of detail...nt

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 07:34 PM

21. MAJOR HINT: The museum that owns painting #6 is on the west coast of the U.S.

Good luck!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #21)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:47 AM

40. So, that one's Matisse. Tea.

But I've found different versions of the title. Tea In The Garden. Tea For Three.

I recognized the dog but could never have placed it without your hint. I was thinking more expressionist than modern for some reason. Maybe because the dog's face looks like a portrait, with spare but strong brush strokes. Or maybe it's just because I love the Expressionists.

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Response to DevonRex (Reply #40)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:51 AM

43. It does look like a portrait! Funny, how it takes on a different "look" when it is

in such closeup.

I do find "Tea in the Garden" to be un-Matisse-y!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 08:58 PM

22. Oh, drat!

I dozed off and got here late to the party. Give me time to catch up...


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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 09:29 PM

24. #1 is

 

The Enunciation of St. Emidus, Carlos Crivelli, 1486. The UFO made it kind of too easy.
http://www.ufopicture.org/ufos_in_art.html

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Response to reteachinwi (Reply #24)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 10:14 PM

25. That painting is absolutely gorgeous.

I could spend hours on it, sections at a time just marveling at all the detail. It's beautiful.

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Response to DevonRex (Reply #25)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:07 AM

36. I wonder why Crivelli isn't better known, his work is so rich in detail and, of course,

COLOR, the signature of the Veneto Renaissance.

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Response to reteachinwi (Reply #24)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 11:47 PM

28. yep, he enunciated the annunciate!

Love the UFO...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #28)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 12:50 AM

31. It's not a UFO. In honor of "details", let's take a closer look.




The first impression is that at the basis of these web sites lies a very simplistic methodology, being any historical or artistic knowledge carefully avoided. The standard practice seems to be: first taking a book concerning art, better if dealing with art works of the 17th or previous centuries; then looking for any strange detail, above all saucer-like objects of any kind. That’s it. This way, obviously, it is easy both to detect strange elements and to declare them “alien” or “unidentified” in respect to the environment or the period in which they appear.

Unbelievable as it may be, those who publish this stuff really seem to have never entered a museum. If so, they would notice that there is a vast amount of Annunciations in which a ray descends from the sky reaching the Madonna. Furthermore, as far as the Crivelli painting is concerned, they would notice that the object in the sky is formed by a circle of clouds inside which there are two circles of small angels.

It is a very common way of representing the divinity, visible in so many works of sacred art.

more...

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Response to greyl (Reply #31)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 12:54 AM

33. Of course. Funny how this did get interpreted in recent times, but we can see how

Last edited Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:30 AM - Edit history (1)

easy it is for folks to make THAT connection.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #33)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 02:17 AM

51. I love this stuff

 

Thanks

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 10:28 PM

26. No. 3 is definitely From X-Men first class!




Sorry , couldnt resist.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 11:04 PM

27. #4 Sandro Botticelli

Adoration of the Magi.

Good Lord. I knew it but couldn't remember why I knew it was Botticelli. Spent forever finding the name. Has something to do with teenage mutant ninja turtles. Don't ask.

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Response to DevonRex (Reply #27)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 11:49 PM

29. One of the finer peacocks in painting!

Did you know this from an art history class?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #29)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:10 AM

37. Nope.

I knew it because I made my boys learn a few things about painters other than those whose names were used by the ninja turtles. We actually have a statue in Florence called by our last name as a nickname. Most of them have nicks. So it was kind of an easy way to get them interested. At the time I was teaching the gifted & talented program at their school and I used whatever I could.

From there I went to Gaudi and architecture and let them go crazy as long as their work was structurally sound. They had a blast.

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Response to DevonRex (Reply #37)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:17 AM

39. Have you been to Florence?

It's been called a museum of itself, which I think is a good description.

Now, Gaudi is another thing...kind of a head trip...I went through his house in Barcelona and I swear that guy was smoking something...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #39)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:50 AM

42. No. But my

husband's family came from there and still had stories to tell. One day we'll go since there are lots of cousins there. Make a family trip of it.

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Response to DevonRex (Reply #42)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:58 AM

44. I found it easy to walk everywhere in Florence.

It seems like you can't turn around without encountering a masterpiece. I marvel at that city. There are so many fabulous things to see that most American tourists don't know about...they go to the Accademia to see the David and walk around the Duomo and miss some great stuff...Orcagna's tabernacle at the Orsanmichele, for instance, and the huge fresco by bonauto in the Spanish Chapel of Santa Maria Novella church. And I think the Pitti Palace is a waste of time spent in the Oltrarno, myself...go to the Brancacci Chapel instead...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #44)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 02:07 AM

46. I love Florence!

Went once, decades ago, and had a wonderful time. It is impressive even for us who are "art-challenged."

Orvieto, too, I'll never forget. I brought home a case or two of the wine the monks made there--and I wish I had more!

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #46)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 02:13 AM

48. Once you know something about the art in Florence, you want to see it all...and that

is murder. Or suicide. But you just can't help it. Better to allow yourself lots of time, make a list and not plan on going crazy in one visit to the Uffizi (which is not very user friendly to begin with, so you need to beware and prioritize).

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #48)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 02:24 AM

52. I was assaulted by art everywhere I turned there

And I mean that in a good way.

You're right--you'll want to plan on spending a lot of time there. It's a glorious experience. And don't forget to stop by Orvieto...the monks there are VERY talented.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #52)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:52 AM

54. My stop in Orvieto was brief and marred by lots of rain and dark skies.

I doubt if I had any of the wine since it was a daytime stop. I guess you have to give up something...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 12:30 AM

30. Clueless on these, nevertheless, R&K so I can see responses.

Been looking for a few weeks. Fun stuff, even if I am no art expert.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 12:53 AM

32. Well, #6 isn't Spitz Dog, ca. 1765, by Thomas Gainsborough

Close, but no cigar.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #32)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:04 AM

35. Want to guess on the little guy in #5?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #35)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:48 AM

41. No

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #41)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 02:03 AM

45. Aww, and he's so cute!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #45)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 02:11 AM

47. He looks like an angel

But he has the devil in him. Kinda reminds me of someone...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:03 AM

34. This Challenge makes me want to...

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #34)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:11 AM

38. Oh, no!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 02:14 AM

49. #5 is that little cherub holding up a mirror to Venus?

I don't remember the name, but if it's the one I'm thinking of, it was once a "paint by number" offering!

It's not Ingres, is it? The brush strokes are too choppy. Not Bottecelli? Am I allowed to look it up when I have these clues, or no?

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Response to Kurovski (Reply #49)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 02:15 AM

50. Sure.

This appears to be a popular meme in painting...lots of cupids holding up mirrors to Venus. this one is prolly one of the most famous.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #50)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 02:25 AM

53. Velázquez, Rokeby Venus

It goes by a number of names.

The Rokeby Venus (also known as The Toilet of Venus, Venus at her Mirror, Venus and Cupid, or La Venus del espejo)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rokeby_Venus

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Response to Kurovski (Reply #53)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 06:54 AM

55. Art critics have all kinds of fits over the left leg of that cupid...

its sketchiness shocks them...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #55)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 03:08 PM

66. Dammit!!!! I had got around to Roman gods/goddesses

and was even looking through the National Gallery Collection when I just couldn't stay awake any longer. I knew that wasn't an angel in the Christian sense.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 09:05 AM

56. HINT for the remaining image, #2...

why is that guy taking off his shirt?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #56)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 12:02 PM

57. Is he going to be baptized?

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Response to Kurovski (Reply #57)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 12:54 PM

59. Yup...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #56)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 12:03 PM

58. Does he work at Chippendales?

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Response to Kurovski (Reply #58)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 12:55 PM

60. No, he couldn't dance so they wouldn't take him...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #60)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 12:56 PM

61. He can't dance, so don't ask him.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:11 PM

62. #2 Pierro della francesco (sp)?



My computer has gone haywire, is that how you spell the artist's name? Just looked up the world's most popular baptiserizer, and found the image WAYYYy down. It doesn't seem to be all over the place, tho many religious sites use it without attribution. (for shame)

What's the story on this one, CT? any juicy details to impart?

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Response to Kurovski (Reply #62)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:48 PM

64. Art critics are nuts over Piero.

della Francesca is an early Renaissance painter. There is actually such a thing as the "della Francesca trail" in Italy, where you can follow his stuff around from one hilltop town to another and I actually know someone who did just that (my ex-husband and a bit of an art snob). It's "fashionable" to do the trail. Here's an interesting short description from slowtravel:http://www.slowtrav.com/italy/art/pk_arttrails.htm

My favorite work by him is the one with the large egg suspended over a "sacra conversazione,"
and featuring one of his oddly oversized madonne. Art historians haggle over the meaning of "the egg," as they call it. It's actually called the Brera Altarpiece and is in Milan.

Here is a Wikipedia entry on "baptism" : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Baptism_of_Christ_%28Piero_della_Francesca%29

Masaccio also painting such baptisms depicting young men readying themselves for baptism: http://www.wikipaintings.org/en/masaccio/baptism-of-the-neophytes-1427

"The Flagellation of Christ" is prolly his most famous painting and it is a bit of a mystery. I am not that fond of his overly white figures but his work with the Brera piece is one of extraordinary beauty:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brera_Madonna (even with the egg and the duke in gleaming armor looking a little silly...).

You might just get hooked on this artist. He IS interesting, but he is not my big favorite. I'm just not fashionable enough, I guess...



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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:40 PM

63. #2's title "The Baptism of Christ".

by Piero della Francesca, for the fully correct spelling.

Thanks, CTYankee, you're the tops!

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Response to Kurovski (Reply #63)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 01:53 PM

65. If I go to London in May I will definitely see this one at the National Gallery.

Who knows, I may become a big fan of his after I experience this firsthand. But I'm a little too old to be putting around to hilltop towns in Tuscany...

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