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Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:19 AM

What I Amazing Is That Texas Used To Be A Blue State. What The Heck Happened -----

to those people? When I started at DOL in 1974 Texas was blue. It had the largest public employee association in the country.

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Reply What I Amazing Is That Texas Used To Be A Blue State. What The Heck Happened ----- (Original post)
TheMastersNemesis Jan 2013 OP
Skink Jan 2013 #1
Honeycombe8 Jan 2013 #2
LiberalFighter Jan 2013 #12
Honeycombe8 Jan 2013 #16
WCGreen Jan 2013 #3
NoPasaran Jan 2013 #4
LiberalFighter Jan 2013 #13
B Calm Jan 2013 #5
onenote Jan 2013 #8
Manifestor_of_Light Jan 2013 #6
thelordofhell Jan 2013 #7
elleng Jan 2013 #9
reformist2 Jan 2013 #10
Chipper Chat Jan 2013 #11
LiberalFighter Jan 2013 #14
Selatius Jan 2013 #15
Orangepeel Jan 2013 #17
bemildred Jan 2013 #18

Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:26 AM

1. BFEE was formed.

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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:26 AM

2. I think...

and it's just my opinion, that some of the social issues just got to be too much for conservative Democrats. Affirmative action and quotas were a big part of it, IMO. More minorities. Then ultimately gay rights. Remember that Texas, being so near Mexico, has a huge hispanic immigrant population.

Also, there seems to have been a lacking of strong Democratic candidates like Ann Richards. They turned into weak sounding, smallish, stereotypical men. Rick Perry used to be a Democrat himself. He changed parties along with everyone else.

I lived in Louisiana and Texas during the 1970's until now. That's my take on it.

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #2)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 01:29 AM

12. Thank goodness he left the party. A weak knee politician.

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Response to LiberalFighter (Reply #12)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 08:12 AM

16. I don't see it that way. He WINS elections. He looks like Ken of Ken & Barbie...

he hunts, he has a strong authoritative voice, he is decisive....whereas teh Democratic men are pale, unhealthy looking, with small voices, unattractive. In other words, the Democrats have been unable to find a candidate who can WIN.

In politics, it's often the case that if you want to be a leader, you have to look and sound like one.

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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:28 AM

3. When the democrats nominated McGovern and the Democratic Party was

seen as the party of pot smoking, liberated women and Civil Rights were being enforced by the federal government.

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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:34 AM

4. Texas was a Democratic state because it took Southerners a century to get over Reconstruction

Starting sometime in the 1970s, southern conservatives started moving to the GOP in one of the great political realignments of history. A couple of decades later, the TDP was as irrelevant as the Texas Republican Party had once been.

Texas is a conservative state, and it's tended to be a one-party state. (Even the antebellum Whigs found it tough going.) It's just the label that has changed over the years.

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Response to NoPasaran (Reply #4)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 01:30 AM

13. LBJ with Civil Rights legislation a major factor.

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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:39 AM

5. Gerrymandering districts!

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Response to B Calm (Reply #5)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:44 AM

8. How did they gerrymander districts without first winning a majority of the state legislature?

Couldn't have been too blue if they were already electing repubs.

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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:40 AM

6. I'll tell you what they were trying to do in 1958.





My parents were delegates to the 1958 Texas Democratic Convention.
They were part of a group trying to nominate Henry B. Gonzalez for governor.
They said there were fistfights, walkouts and rump conventions!!
And some old lady hit Father over the head with her purse in the middle of a free-for-all!!!
Ah, the good old days!!!


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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:42 AM

7. They believed their own hype.........

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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:52 AM

9. The long goodbye

Is the white Southern Democrat extinct, endangered or just hibernating?
Nov 11th 2010

AFTER President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, he reportedly turned to his press secretary and lamented that Democrats “have lost the South for a generation.” Johnson's judgment was optimistic. Despite brief flashes of strength during the presidential elections of Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, Democrats—particularly white Democrats—have been losing ground in the South for half a century.

In the Congress that passed the Civil Rights Act in 1964, the eleven former Confederate states—Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia—had a total of 128 senators and representatives, of whom 115 were white Democrats (see chart). In 1981 Republicans took control of the Senate for the first time since 1953, but most Southern elected officials remained white Democrats. When Republicans took control of the House in 1995, white Democrats still comprised one-third of the South's tally.

This year, however, it seems that white Southern Democrats have met their Appomattox: they will account for just 24 of the South's 155 senators and congressmen in the incoming Congress. The delegations from Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and South Carolina held only white Democrats in 1963; when the new Congress convenes next January, they will have none. Georgia was also once a Democratic stronghold—in 1981 its House delegation's lone Republican was a fresh-faced young history professor called Newt Gingrich—but this year Republicans won every statewide office. Democrats do well in black and Hispanic-dominated districts, the Virginia suburbs of Washington, DC, and the university-heavy areas around Raleigh, North Carolina and Austin, Texas. Otherwise the South is largely red.

This does not indicate a disappearance of liberals. White Southern Democrats were largely conservative before, and the Democratic domination of Congress in the second half of the 20th century rested on an uneasy coalition between men such as James Eastland, a senator from Mississippi who insisted three years after Brown v Board of Education banned segregation that “the vast majority of Negroes want their own schools, their own hospitals, their own churches, their own restaurants”, and northern urban liberals such as Ted Kennedy. Strom Thurmond, Richard Shelby and Phil Gramm—Southern Republican stalwarts all—were first elected as Democrats, and of the 37 Democrats who voted against the health-care bill in March, 16 were Southern whites.'

http://www.economist.com/node/17467202

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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 12:57 AM

10. GOP has successfully used racism to make white voters opposed to all liberal ideas.


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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 01:10 AM

11. The influence of the Southern Baptist Church.

Fire and brimstone! Vote republican or you'll go to hell. Etc:

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Response to Chipper Chat (Reply #11)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 01:33 AM

14. They need to be told that hell isn't what they need to worry about.

It is aliens from outside the galaxy returning to invade the bodies of their women.

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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 02:04 AM

15. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 ensured political realignment of the South over the next 50 years.

Prior to the Civil Rights Act, the New Deal Coalition was forged to fight off the Great Depression and curb some of the more grievous abuses on Wall Street. Progressive taxation and jobs programs seemed to ensure that the New Deal Coalition would last for a very long time.

In those days, social wedge issues involving guns, gays, and the Bible were hardly addressed by any of the two major parties. The result is that people tended to align politically over economic issues. It is over economic issues that the Democratic Party won the most votes. The party became known as the party of the working class, while the Republican Party was the party of private business interest and Wall Street.

The social movements of the 1960s and the Civil Rights Act all but guaranteed the destruction of the New Deal Coalition. It took some time, but the new alignment essentially meant that the Democratic Party lost most of the rural vote, where once rural locales were hotbeds of left-wing activism in decades past. While most working class people in rural areas have more economic commonality with workers in urban areas, they tend to separate over social issues, and that separation has never been gapped.

Given that the new play by Wall Street is to donate cash to members of both political parties, usually one more than the other during any mid-term and major election year but always an amount to both, the parties tend to fight over social issues instead of economic ones. It's the safer bet. Followed by tremendous corporate consolidation over radio and television programming, this trend would only be reinforced, as the shareholders of these companies prefer the ostracism of views considered too far to the left for their liking. Few shareholders would allow their networks to push policies that specifically challenge their economic monopoly.

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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 08:24 AM

17. The same thing that happened to the rest of the south, plus oil money?

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Response to TheMastersNemesis (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 09:17 AM

18. Racism, that's what happened.

For the second time in 200+ years, the South stuck by the slaveowners and racists.

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