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Tue Jan 29, 2013, 11:06 AM

Dirty Wars: Jeremy Scahill's antidote to Zero Dark Thirty's heroic narrative

In this new documentary, the Nation's investigative reporter lifts the lid on the ugly reality of US counter-terror operations



The film Dirty Wars details the stories of Afghans who have experienced attacks by drones or special forces. Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images

Amy Goodman
guardian.co.uk
Monday 28 January 2013 14.56 EST

As President Barack Obama prepared to be sworn in for his second term as the 44th president of the United States, two courageous journalists premiered a documentary at the annual Sundance Film Festival. Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield reaffirms the critical role played by independent journalists like the film's director, Rick Rowley, and its narrator and central figure, Jeremy Scahill.

The increasing pace of US drone strikes, and the Obama administration's reliance on shadowy special forces to conduct military raids beyond the reach of oversight and accountability, were summarily missed over the inaugural weekend by a US press corps obsessed with first lady Michelle Obama's new bangs. Dirty Wars, along with Scahill's forthcoming book of the same title, is on target to break that silence with a bang that matters.

Scahill and Rowley, no strangers to war zones, ventured beyond Kabul, Afghanistan, south to Gardez, in Paktia province, a region dense with armed Taliban and their allies in the Haqqani network, to investigate one of the thousands of night raids that typically go unreported. Scahill told me:

"In Gardez, US special operations forces had intelligence that a Taliban cell was having some sort of a meeting to prepare a suicide bomber. And they raid the house in the middle of the night, and they end up killing five people, including three women, two of whom were pregnant, and Mohammed Daoud, a senior Afghan police commander who had been trained by the US."


http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jan/28/dirty-wars-jeremy-scahill-zero-dark-thirty

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Reply Dirty Wars: Jeremy Scahill's antidote to Zero Dark Thirty's heroic narrative (Original post)
rug Jan 2013 OP
Luminous Animal Jan 2013 #1
rug Jan 2013 #2
think Jan 2013 #4
Luminous Animal Jan 2013 #7
progressoid Jan 2013 #3
rug Jan 2013 #5
Luminous Animal Jan 2013 #6

Response to rug (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 11:24 AM

1. I am looking forward to seeing this.

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Response to Luminous Animal (Reply #1)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 11:32 AM

2. Me too. Keep checking the link see when screenings are scheduled near you.

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Response to rug (Reply #2)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 01:45 PM

4. Ty for the link /nt

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Response to Luminous Animal (Reply #1)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 07:36 PM

7. Kick.

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Response to rug (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 01:27 PM

3. Here's Amy's interview with Jeremy Scahill & Rick Rowley at the Sundance Film Festival

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Response to progressoid (Reply #3)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 02:21 PM

5. Thanks!

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Response to rug (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 02:28 PM

6. Variety did a great review...

Filed from the frontlines of the war on terror, documentarian Richard Rowley's astonishingly hard-hitting "Dirty Wars" renders the investigative work of journalist Jeremy Scahill in the form of a '70s-style conspiracy thriller. A reporter for the Nation, Scahill follows a blood-strewn trail from a remote corner of Afghanistan, where covert night raids have claimed the lives of innocents, to the Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC), a shadowy outfit empowered by the current White House to assassinate those on an ever-expanding "kill list," including at least one American. This jaw-dropping, persuasively researched pic has the power to pry open government lockboxes


http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117949103/

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