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Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:22 PM

Hi, everybody! Here is your Friday Afternoon Challenge: “Group Shots”!

Can you name their titles?

And please don’t cheat...it ruins the Challenge for others...

1.


2.


3.


4.


5.


6.

105 replies, 5719 views

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Arrow 105 replies Author Time Post
Reply Hi, everybody! Here is your Friday Afternoon Challenge: “Group Shots”! (Original post)
CTyankee Jan 2013 OP
snooper2 Jan 2013 #1
CTyankee Jan 2013 #2
jberryhill Jan 2013 #3
CTyankee Jan 2013 #6
jberryhill Jan 2013 #7
CTyankee Jan 2013 #13
hedgehog Jan 2013 #4
CTyankee Jan 2013 #8
jberryhill Jan 2013 #5
CTyankee Jan 2013 #9
CaliforniaPeggy Jan 2013 #10
CTyankee Jan 2013 #11
oldhippie Jan 2013 #12
CTyankee Jan 2013 #14
oldhippie Jan 2013 #15
CTyankee Jan 2013 #16
panader0 Jan 2013 #103
CTyankee Jan 2013 #104
gateley Jan 2013 #17
CTyankee Jan 2013 #18
gateley Jan 2013 #21
CTyankee Jan 2013 #22
gateley Jan 2013 #24
horseshoecrab Jan 2013 #19
CTyankee Jan 2013 #20
horseshoecrab Jan 2013 #25
CTyankee Jan 2013 #26
horseshoecrab Jan 2013 #57
CTyankee Jan 2013 #23
joeybee12 Jan 2013 #28
CTyankee Jan 2013 #38
horseshoecrab Jan 2013 #59
CTyankee Jan 2013 #61
horseshoecrab Jan 2013 #74
CTyankee Jan 2013 #79
gateley Jan 2013 #27
getting old in mke Jan 2013 #30
gateley Jan 2013 #32
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #33
CTyankee Jan 2013 #86
CTyankee Jan 2013 #39
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #29
CTyankee Jan 2013 #40
gateley Jan 2013 #49
CTyankee Jan 2013 #82
gateley Jan 2013 #93
CTyankee Jan 2013 #94
reteachinwi Jan 2013 #31
CTyankee Jan 2013 #41
reteachinwi Jan 2013 #50
CTyankee Jan 2013 #52
burrowowl Jan 2013 #34
cthulu2016 Jan 2013 #35
getting old in mke Jan 2013 #36
CTyankee Jan 2013 #43
getting old in mke Jan 2013 #46
CTyankee Jan 2013 #47
getting old in mke Jan 2013 #48
CTyankee Jan 2013 #51
Chiyo-chichi Jan 2013 #58
CTyankee Jan 2013 #95
Chiyo-chichi Jan 2013 #97
CTyankee Jan 2013 #102
CTyankee Jan 2013 #45
CTyankee Jan 2013 #42
malaise Jan 2013 #37
CTyankee Jan 2013 #44
grantcart Jan 2013 #63
malaise Jan 2013 #68
CTyankee Jan 2013 #70
grantcart Jan 2013 #73
CTyankee Jan 2013 #77
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #78
CTyankee Jan 2013 #80
grantcart Jan 2013 #83
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #84
grantcart Jan 2013 #90
CTyankee Jan 2013 #99
grantcart Jan 2013 #100
CTyankee Jan 2013 #101
limpyhobbler Jan 2013 #53
CTyankee Jan 2013 #54
reteachinwi Jan 2013 #55
CTyankee Jan 2013 #62
Suich Jan 2013 #56
Hekate Jan 2013 #65
burrowowl Jan 2013 #60
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #64
Manifestor_of_Light Jan 2013 #66
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #67
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #69
CTyankee Jan 2013 #71
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #72
horseshoecrab Jan 2013 #75
CTyankee Jan 2013 #81
CTyankee Jan 2013 #76
entanglement Jan 2013 #85
CTyankee Jan 2013 #87
entanglement Jan 2013 #92
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #88
CTyankee Jan 2013 #89
entanglement Jan 2013 #91
CTyankee Jan 2013 #96
rppper Jan 2013 #98
CTyankee Jan 2013 #105

Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:23 PM

1. The second one...

god's first attempt at a black hole?

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Response to snooper2 (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:27 PM

2. certainly looks like it...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:40 PM

3. #2 is by that Italian guy

It was his first go at "Sea Lion Going After Anchovies"



And not one decent upskirt view in the bunch.

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #3)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:45 PM

6. for his pizza!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #6)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:46 PM

7. For a second there, I thought you were talking about me



Then I realized you meant "piazza"

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #7)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:50 PM

13. Pizza on the piazza...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:43 PM

4. I am getting a real kick out of #4 - I love the heads

sticking out around the arch as if those fellows were peaking though some windows!

I identified the woman on the left as St Barbara immediately, and didn't know how I did that until I looked closed and saw her holding a tower. I saw it before I saw it, so to speak.

Anyone else spot St. Sebastian there on the bottom?

Also - John the Baptist, St. Roch, St. James.

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Response to hedgehog (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:47 PM

8. wherever there is an arrow you know who will be present!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:44 PM

5. #3 is a storyboard sketch from Raiders of the Lost Ark by Spielberg

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #5)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:47 PM

9. Nuthin' new is there?

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:48 PM

10. #1--Italian Renaissance?

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Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Reply #10)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:49 PM

11. Absolutely, Peggy!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:50 PM

12. I love your Friday art challenges, .....

But I see the warning about cheating. I'm not sure what constitutes cheating in this contest. How would one cheat? Don't look in books? Don't search the 'net? Just go from memory? Please explain for a newbie. Thanks.

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Response to oldhippie (Reply #12)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:52 PM

14. there is a way you can find the location of the image and thus find out what it is.

It's pretty simple but I needn't go into it here.

Just plain Googling is just fine and what everybody does. Books, great! Memory, wonderful!

What I really want is a conversation about art. The Challenge is just a little "hook" to get people wondering and trying to find out...it's a wonderful experience and folks seem to like doing the sleuthing!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #14)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:56 PM

15. Ahhh, got it!

I didn't think of that, but now that you mention it I understand. OK, no cheating.

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Response to oldhippie (Reply #15)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:58 PM

16. Or, if you cheat, just don't pretend to "guess." Besides being annoying, it is just rude...

folks tell me that they have fun with the "chase."

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #14)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 11:08 PM

103. I can't believe googling is not cheating

If you don't know it, you don't know it. P.S. What is googling?
CT, I love your challenges. Thanks

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Response to panader0 (Reply #103)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 07:05 PM

104. I think people find a picture they like (for whatever reason) and they want to learn more,

so they Google the subject of the picture and up come a bunch of other pictures maybe of the same theme and then they start exploring. some people never had art history in school so they might find this a really illuminating experience.

Google provides a very important service in this regard. People indulge their need and love for art and what's the harm? I really don't want to "stump" anybody. I want them to look further and find what they might not know (boy, do I know about that!). I've heard from several DUers that my Challenges have helped them find things they never knew were there and that makes me feel so good!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:02 PM

17. K&R

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Response to gateley (Reply #17)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:06 PM

18. Thanks. Any guesses?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #18)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:13 PM

21. Never.



I always K&R to help keep it going, then come back to be educated after those who know have weighed in.


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Response to gateley (Reply #21)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:16 PM

22. OK, stay tuned!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #22)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:18 PM

24. Always!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:07 PM

19. #3

#3 is called Fanatics of Tangier and is by Eugene Delacroix.


CTYankee. Always love your art challenge!

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Response to horseshoecrab (Reply #19)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:10 PM

20. Yep, good! I really thought that picture just screamed Delacroix...

evidently, the poor guy was in a house when the street riot erupted and he glimpsed the events through the louvered shade...probably terrified...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #20)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:30 PM

25. definitely


There was no doubt that it was Delacroix's style. Looking him up on google was able to find the name of this work.

So I learned that these dervishes would sweep through entire towns this way, scaring up the populace, causing a racket and collecting alms. Perhaps a case of "nice town you got here... It'd be a shame if anything happened to it?"

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Response to horseshoecrab (Reply #25)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:36 PM

26. Because I'm catching an early train into Manhattan to see my little "urban baby" I won't be

able to post too much tomorrow...I'm here tonight, tho!...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #26)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 09:33 PM

57. good!

Urban Baby -- I love it.

Have a wonderful first meeting with Jack tomorrow, CTYankee!


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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:17 PM

23. HINT on # 4 cuz I'm sorry about the small image...

This work is the “street art” of it’s time (and it is still on the street...) and is a part of a fascinating period of labor history (way back history!).

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #23)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:38 PM

28. Is this in Florence?

It looks familiar to me...but I'm blanking out...

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Response to joeybee12 (Reply #28)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:40 PM

38. Yes, it is Florence...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #38)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 10:44 PM

59. #4

Can't believe I found it.


Tabernacle of the Fonticine by Giovanni Della Robbia. It's a street tabernacle and is apparently part of a tradition of having a madonna on every street.

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Response to horseshoecrab (Reply #59)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 02:13 AM

61. tough find! When I first saw it, I thought of LUCA della Robbia, Giovanni's great uncle...

easy enough because of the glazed terra cotta. But not as refined and frankly not nearly as well done as Luca's work.

The "labor history" of this is very interesting and I have to thank Jill Burke for her scholarship on this from her excellent essay pushing back on the meme that only the great families of Florence were responsible for the wonderful art of Florence in the early to mid Italian Renaissance. This appears in her piece in "Viewing Renaissance Art" a Yale University Press book and her essay is entitled "Florence Art and the Public Good." She asserts that the guilds and other labor organizations of the day were ardent supporters of the art of the era and responsible for much of its greatness.

This work was sponsored about one of the poorest of labor groups in the city, the wool workers. It demarcated their "territory" where they lived and also served as a kind of supplication to the Virgin and the saints Barbara and Caterina to give them aid in the time of pestilence (black death).

I'd be interested in knowing the source you had, since I haven't run across too many references to this particular tabernacle. Please share it since I think it would be a great read and I love anything about that era in Florence.

Note the homage to the doors of the Baptistery, with the popping out heads surrounding the scene?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #61)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 03:19 PM

74. Here ya go ...

The style told me that this was one of the Della Robbia, so being pretty sure of that was a big help, eventually.

Did a lot of searches for "della robbia, outdoor art, florence." Still not finding it. Figured out that it was a tabernacle by its shape. I just stared at the thing waiting for something - anything - to jump out and me. Worked on the inscription where I found something that really helped:

The inscription on the tabernacle states that it was posted on the Via Chaterina in 1522 (MDXXII). Couldn't be Luca - he died in 1482. So, this would have to have been either Andrea or Giovanni Della Robbia.

So, this narrowed it down. A search on "Della Robbia, Florence, tabernacle 1522" and variations of that led quickly to the big hits.

The hits that I would call scholarly are:
http://www.academia.edu/425678/_Every_Sort_of_Manual_Type_and_Mostly_Foreigners_Migrants_Brothers_and_Festive_Kings_in_Early_Modern_Florence

This deals with the wool workers, in this case German and Flemish immigrants, and how much they added to the Florence art scene in their commissioning of these works.

and also this, in which author, Allan Marquand, mentions Giovanni's homage to Ghiberti's bronze gate, and plenty more!

http://books.google.com/books?id=VMQVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA157&lpg=PA157&dq=inscription+on+Tabernacolo+delle+Fonticine&source=bl&ots=007C8_dpBt&sig=wL1xz1zI2CsD-gzlCb3Mp05PJ7c&hl=en&sa=X&ei=JQkEUajRI-my0QGB3YHQAw&ved=0CEwQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=inscription%20on%20Tabernacolo%20delle%20Fonticine&f=false


Love those popping heads on the baptistery gate and on the tabernacle! Fascinating challenge this week.

Hope this helps CTYankee.


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Response to horseshoecrab (Reply #74)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 07:28 PM

79. I LOVED that last read! It was a nice addendum to Jill Burke's masterful analysis (which is

a very lefty message and I love it!).

This stuff is great, altho I think lots of folks would think us crazy for our eating it all up!

I wish I could find the other two companion books to Viewing Art in the Renaissance put out by Yale University Press, but I can't seem to find them in my library...and I only get library books now, alas...no more room for more books in my house!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:37 PM

27. Where is everybody?

I'm especially intrigued by#'s 2 and 5 -- and love the floor on #1!

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Response to gateley (Reply #27)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:01 PM

30. #2

Looks like a view of the Rapture from the point of view of one left behind. For some reason I think of this on the ceiling of some English country house.

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Response to getting old in mke (Reply #30)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:07 PM

32. Hmmm... I wasn't sure WHAT I thought it was,

but that's sure a possibility!

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Response to gateley (Reply #32)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:30 PM

33. It reminds me of Michelangelo's 'The Last Judgment' at the Sistine Chapel

I'm guessing this is the same subject by another artist.


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Response to gateley (Reply #32)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 02:00 AM

86. The Mannerists were reactionary against established Renaissance principles... they

seemed determined to "lose" linear perspective and indulged in a bit of wildness that I find disturbing. Tintoretto can be, to me, particularly strange. There's some weird stuff with those guys...it's probably my least favorite styles/eras of Western art. Rosso da Fiorentino was downright unhinged and painted some crazed looking madonne and saints (but then comes up with some adorable putti)...

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Response to getting old in mke (Reply #30)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:42 PM

39. No, it isn't...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 06:57 PM

29. #1: Fra Filippo Lippi - Herod's Banquet

This fresco shows three episodes within the same painting. The beheading of John the Baptist, Salome entertaining the guests with her dancing, and Salome presenting the severed head to Herod.

http://www.italian-renaissance-art.com/Fra-Filippo-Lippi.html

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #29)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:48 PM

40. Nothing like a head on a platter and a dancing woman to announce SALOME! Ta da!

The model for Salome is, of course, Lippi's mistress and mother of his future children, who had been a noviate nun under his "care" as a monk at their convent in Prato when she got inconveniently impregnated by him when she was posing as his Madonnas....

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #40)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:23 PM

49. Great story!

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Response to gateley (Reply #49)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 08:03 PM

82. Probably not so great for the young woman but felippo lippi was a bad monk and never

should have been one (he was "given" to the church as a young child, a common practice in those days). So he drank and caroused as a monk and was (incredibly) put in charge of a convent of nuns, of all things. Because he was producing great art for the church (this was at the beginning of the counter reformation, after all) the Pope "took pity" on him and the teenaged novitiate he impregnated and told them they could relinquish their vows and marry. She did but he kept on...

If you are ever in the Uffizi in Florence you will see this lovely young woman Lippi painted as his Maddone in several works. Such beauty...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #82)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 02:38 PM

93. Thanks for the education! How interesting!

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Response to gateley (Reply #93)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 02:58 PM

94. There's actually a novel based on this love affair (can't remember the title)

by two women authors, Laura Morowitz and Laurie Lico Albanese. Albanese wrote this article in the NYT back in 2008: http://travel.nytimes.com/2008/03/02/travel/02next.html?_r=0 about the restoration of this fresco. It is in the Prato Cathedral (outside Florence) which is where they have the green sash of the Virgin, allegedly thrown down to the apostle Thomas by the Virgin on her way up to heaven in the Assumption. The sash is displayed on Sept. 8, the Virgin's Feast Day.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:02 PM

31. I thought #2

 

was The Ascension of Christ by Bernardino Gatti , but alas...

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Response to reteachinwi (Reply #31)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:50 PM

41. no, but the ascension of just about anybody is lost in all the damn legs...doncha love

Mannerism...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #41)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:24 PM

50. No I don't

 

but they were following a tough act.

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Response to reteachinwi (Reply #50)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:26 PM

52. I don't either, but sometimes it is so ridiculous you just have to laugh...this is one of those

Last edited Sat Jan 26, 2013, 02:16 AM - Edit history (1)

moments in art...what the hell was he thinking....???? but it is not Gatti...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:31 PM

34. K&R!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:33 PM

35. #5 is Sir Lawrence AT (I assume)

Is #1 a Botticelli?

#4 is Jeff Koons, of course <joke>

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Response to cthulu2016 (Reply #35)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:37 PM

36. You mean #5 is Sir Lawrence AT?

That was the hint I needed to find it. Once I saw others of his, the style is very clear. Sort of like one of the old-fashioned photo shops.

(I guess so--you edited it to #5 while I was replying )

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Response to getting old in mke (Reply #36)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:08 PM

43. and the winner is?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #43)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:14 PM

46. Oh, right :)

The Women of Amphissa

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Response to getting old in mke (Reply #46)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:16 PM

47. There ya go! How did you get that?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #47)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:21 PM

48. The Google

I hadn't heard of him before, so started browsing.

He has sort of an unreal realism going on. Of course it helps that I'm currently listening my way through a series of audiobooks that take place in ancient Rome.

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Response to getting old in mke (Reply #48)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:24 PM

51. He's an interesting guy. Kind of lost favor in the first part of the 20th century but then

has regained somewhat. I had greeting card with his "spring" on it so I have been impressed with him for some time. His stuff is beautiful...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #51)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 09:50 PM

58. Here's a great video I found on The Women of Amphissa.

The woman in the center looking straight out at the viewer is the artist's wife.

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Response to Chiyo-chichi (Reply #58)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 07:06 PM

95. I just had a chance to see this! Wow! What a great find, chiya! Good for you!

I love this link to the picture's history. It is illuminating.

thanks so much for informing all of us. Where did you find it?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #95)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 07:36 PM

97. I just found it by Googling the title of the painting.

This one grabbed me for some reason and I wanted to know more.

I think the first thing that drew me in was that the group of 3 or 4 women to the left in the foreground look almost photo realistic as compared to the 3 women who are on the floor in the foreground.

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Response to Chiyo-chichi (Reply #97)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 07:41 PM

102. It is a bit odd...I'm not sure what the artist is trying to say...but maybe it is just telling a

story...

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Response to getting old in mke (Reply #36)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:13 PM

45. I haven't heard the title of #5 yet. Do you have it?

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Response to cthulu2016 (Reply #35)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:52 PM

42. Plz. a little respect for Sir Lawrence, ahem! I love them...

As for #6,shame on you..you will be SO unhappy...look at the clues...you will get it...

(not really, you are great, Cthulu...just wrong on this one...)

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 07:39 PM

37. I'm here to learn

Don't have a clue

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Response to malaise (Reply #37)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:11 PM

44. Hi, Malaise! Nice to see you here! Hope to have a good time...

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Response to malaise (Reply #37)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 02:44 AM

63. I am here for the humiliation.


I not only don't have a clue, I don't have any idea how to cheat.

She always says "no cheating". I can' even figure out how the hell you would cheat at this.

Now I do provide a valuable community service, however, as everyone else can say, despite how little they may know, "at least I know more than grantcart" and that would be true.

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Response to grantcart (Reply #63)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 04:31 AM

68. That's only because I don't attempt to answer

Like you I don't even know how to cheat at this.
I do love this weekly thread.

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Response to grantcart (Reply #63)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 07:38 AM

70. it seems to me that it is no fun to cheat (you just follow the "copy image location" to

on google and up it comes). There I told you.

But most people here are good sports or at least I believe them to be. If they feel that they have to cheat to get to the right answer, then they're missing the whole point which is the joy of the art pursuit!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #70)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 11:54 AM

73. actually I knew how to do that and sometimes I right click to see if simply reading the


right click locator I could figure it out.


Nope.


I still enjoy your threads a lot but in order for me to participate you are going to have to use examples of original artwork used in creating American cartoons circa 1960 to 1965, preferably from the Warner Brothers Bugs Bunny/Daffy Duck school of art.

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Response to grantcart (Reply #73)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 06:34 PM

77. I hope to inspire you! What happens is eventually you find an artist whose works are

interesting or that "speak" to you...if you know what I mean...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #77)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 07:23 PM

78. Well, we can certainly scratch Correggio off that list

If you know what I mean...

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #78)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 07:29 PM

80. Well, he IS entertaining, isn't he?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #77)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 10:45 PM

83. Well I do have an affection for the work of Tex Avery.

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Response to grantcart (Reply #83)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 10:51 PM

84. Not to mention Hanna-Barbera.




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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #84)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 01:19 PM

90. Exactly but CTYankee will never include them in an OP will she?



Jealous of their commercial success!!

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Response to grantcart (Reply #90)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 12:46 PM

99. Actually, my former father in law wrote music for Paramount Cartoon Studios in New York.

My kids still get royalty payments whenever those old cartoons are played.

Through him I also knew Jack Zander who created the character of Jerry in the old Tom and Jerry cartoons. He was living in the NYC area at the time I knew him, having moved there from California after he did the Tom and Jerry cartoons...

However, I do not know enough about cartoon art to include them in a Challenge. I think the history of cartoon art is wonderful and there were some great artists who did them (I mean commercially in the political sense that we mean it today -- "cartoon" has a different connotation in art history).

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #99)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 06:02 PM

100. great


BTW I always consider it a win when I am able to get CTyankee to respond to one of my bizzare off the wall posts.


Its the only way I can score on the Friday challenge.

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Response to grantcart (Reply #100)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 06:04 PM

101. Ohhh, mr. grant....

I luv ya for that! You are so sweet...thanks...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:29 PM

53. I can't name any of them. I must be art illiterate.

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Response to limpyhobbler (Reply #53)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:31 PM

54. no, no, just put a few clues together and google them! You might get the right answer!

Folks here do it all the time and so do I! Love it!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:38 PM

55. #6 has the signature Ferat

 

and Jules-Descartes Ferat has a bio that matches the hint CTYankee gave us but I haven't identified the work.

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Response to reteachinwi (Reply #55)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 02:23 AM

62. I don't know where that comes from but this is not his...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:56 PM

56. "There's no such thing as a stupid question."

#5 sure looks like a photo...how did he do that? Must be a warm day, with the women sitting and laying all over that cool marble floor!

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Response to Suich (Reply #56)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 03:00 AM

65. See post 58 above -- such fun to learn about an artist I never heard of before!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 12:46 AM

60. K&R

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 02:49 AM

64. #6: J. M. W. Turner - The Battle of Trafalgar (detail)

Detail from:

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 03:24 AM

66. #5 looks like the School of Athens

by Raphael, but it's been turned into Nappy Time at the ladies' spa.

YAWN!!!!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 04:10 AM

67. #2: Correggio - Assumption of the Virgin (in the Cathedral of Parma)

The Assumption of the Virgin is a fresco by the Italian Late Renaissance artist Antonio da Correggio decorating the dome of the Cathedral of Parma, Italy. Correggio signed the contract for the painting on November 3, 1522. It was finished in 1530.

The composition was influenced by Melozzo da Forlì's perspective and includes the decoration of the dome base, which represents the four protector saints of Parma: St. John the Baptist with the lamb, St. Hilary with a yellow mantle, St. Thomas (or Joseph) with an angel carrying the martyrdom palm leaf, and St. Bernard, the sole figure looking upwards.

Below the feet of Jesus, the uncorrupt Virgin in red and blue robes is lofted upward by a vortex of singing or otherwise musical angels. Ringing the base of the dome, between the windows, stand the perplexed Apostles, as if standing around the empty tomb in which they have just placed her. In the group of the blessed can be seen: Adam and Eve, Judith with the head of Holofernes. At the centre of the dome is a foreshortened beardless Jesus descending to meet his mother.

Correggio's Assumption would eventually serve as a catalyst and inspiration for the dramatically-illusionistic, di sotto in su ceiling paintings of the 17th-century Baroque period. In Correggio's work, and in the work of his Baroque heirs, the entire architectural surface is treated as a single pictorial unit of vast proportions and opened up via painting, so that the dome of the church is equated with the vault of heaven. The illusionistic manner in which the figures seem to protrude into the spectators' space was, at the time, an audacious and astounding use of foreshortening, though the technique later became common among Baroque artists who specialized in illusionistic vault decoration.

Among many other works, Correggio's Assumption inspired Carlo Cignani for his fresco Assumption of the Virgin, in the cathedral church of Forlì; and Giovanni Lanfranco's fresco of the dome in the church of Sant'Andrea della Valle in Rome.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assumption_of_the_Virgin_(Correggio)



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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 04:53 AM

69. ANSWERS:

As posted in the thread, subject to confirmation/correction by CTyankee:

1. Fra Filippo Lippi - Herod's Banquet
2. Correggio - Assumption of the Virgin
3. Eugene Delacroix - Fanatics of Tangier
4. Giovanni Della Robbia - Tabernacle of the Fonticine
5. Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema - The Women of Amphissa
6. J. M. W. Turner - The Battle of Trafalgar

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #69)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 07:40 AM

71. Great, Pinboy. All correct. How did you get to the Correggio?

I'm off to catch a train to Manhattan to see my new grandbaby but I'll be back tonight and will check in with you...interested in knowing your art chase with Correggio from that loony Mannerist period!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #71)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 09:05 AM

72. I used my own special, highly-sophisticated method: Dumb luck :)

All of these works were tough, because in most cases they weren't turning up in normal searching, even after repeated tweaks of the search terms. For more tweaking ideas for the Correggio, I looked at the titles of similar works, some of which included names like Abraham and some prominent saints--but the names were no help. Other terms from the titles finally did it. I don't think I used 'assumption'--I think I found it when I included 'apotheosis.' (As you know, one can get a bit spacey after searching a lot of images, and it can be hard to remember what was the final key.)

The Turner should have been the easiest. But I think I overlooked the painting when it popped up in early searches because I wasn't recognizing it from the detail (easy to do when looking at small images of large canvasses). It was only looking at the titles of similar works that led me to include 'Trafalgar' in my search terms.

I think horseshoecrab's find (the Giovanni Della Robbia) may have been the toughest (along with the Sir Lawrence), because I couldn't find it even when I searched on 'tabernacle.'

Thanks for another great challenge, CTyankee. This one was tough--but I guess I'm addicted to the weekly combo of torture and fun. (Do you think I need to see someone about that?)

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #72)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 03:36 PM

75. Getting the Turner was excellent!

I simply gave up on the Turner. I know what you mean -- In the heat of the chase, things melt together but I'm glad you kept at it pinboy3niner!

Thanks for the hat-tip. That tabernacle was brutal but gratifying to hunt down. The Turner was tougher because of it being a detail. So hat's off back at you!

Combo of torture and fun? hmmm . . .

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Response to horseshoecrab (Reply #75)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 07:33 PM

81. The key word was "tabernacle." I would not have thught of that word in describing this

work. To me a tabernacle is more like Orcagna's in the Orsanmichele. The della Robbia looked more like a shrine. Usually, a tabernacle has a painting or a crucifix recessed with a four cornered apparatus enclosing it. Or at least the way I see it...

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #72)

Sat Jan 26, 2013, 06:32 PM

76. Thanks! I thought my mentioning Mannerism would have eventually led someone to find

this...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 01:01 AM

85. This is a Saturday night challenge for me :)

I didn't get any individual titles correct, but I at least guessed Lawrence Alma-Tadema correctly so that counts for something, doesn't it? I find pre-Raphaelite artists the easiest to identify, for some reason.

Too bad I failed to identify Delacroix despite having seen so many of his beautiful works

As a token of thanks, here is one of my Delacroix favorites - it is also based on his North African odyssey.



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Response to entanglement (Reply #85)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 02:06 AM

87. That is an exciting picture! Thanks for that. I hadn't seen it.

Have you seen his works in the Louvre? I found "Death of Sardanapolous" to be quite impressive...that section is dumbfounding...Gericault is there and "Death of the Virgin" by Caravaggio is not too far away...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #87)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 02:00 PM

92. No, but I can imagine that seeing the original "Death of Sardanapalus" would be

quite the experience!

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Response to entanglement (Reply #85)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 04:27 AM

88. If you got the AT off the top of your head, you did great!

Most of us struggle to search for images, but we have the utmost respect for those who have real art knowledge.

Nice Delacroix you posted, too.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #88)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 08:54 AM

89. I am convinced that pre-raphaelite art "engages" our brains to such an extent that we

are more inclined to embrace it than some the art of some other eras...this is my non-scientifically based theory and maybe it's cracked, but there is something about it that we look for and "hunger" for...kind of like sweetness in foods...AT is particularly good at his craft and art and deserves our respect.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #88)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 01:53 PM

91. Thanks

I am (alas) a dilettante and very far from possessing "real art knowledge". However, I've found that visiting CTYankee's thread weekly does have a rather beneficial effect.

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Response to entanglement (Reply #91)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 07:12 PM

96. Hey, I'm a dilettante, too! But I am retired so I can spend LOTS of time just scouring books in

the library and websites on art...I've also been lucky enough to travel and look at art so I have been lucky so far.

I am so glad you like this project. I feel good that I am engendering a bit of interest in art here!

Thank you for your kind and encouraging words...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 08:40 PM

98. Fresco from the Vank catherderal

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Response to rppper (Reply #98)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 07:10 PM

105. Thank you! This Armenian cathedral is very interesting!

Link to history: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vank_Cathedral

Thank you for this information. What a fabulous history there...

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