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Fri Jan 25, 2013, 10:01 AM

Looking for a silver lining on filibuster reform? (updated)

Last edited Fri Jan 25, 2013, 11:13 AM - Edit history (1)

The Morning Plum: What’s next for filibuster reformers?

Now that the smoke has cleared from the wreckage of yesterday’s filibuster reform debacle, what’s next for those who want to fix our broken Senate? There is no denying that yesterday’s outcome was a terrible disappoint for those who still hold out hope for functional government. At the same time, there are some silver linings.

There is now an infrastructure of outside groups and activists that has shown the ability to mobilize at least some public concern about an extremely arcane problem, dramatizing the need for better governance and the dangerous consequences of having a Senate that has functionally ceased to be a democratic body. What’s more, we’ve now seen that the ongoing influx of energetic and liberal reform-minded Senators has proven able to force the old lions to embrace some change and to pay lip service to the need to change the way the Senate operates. If reformers maintain that outside infrastructure, and elect more energetic Dems to the Senate, that could boost the possibility of more reform later.

In an interview with me this morning, one of the leading proponents of filibuster change — Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico — reflected on what reformers had accomplished and on what’s next, and vowed to revisit reform “every two years” if necessary.

“When I started this three years ago, it was pretty lonely,” Udall told me. “But there are millions of Americans who now want to see a changed Senate. They understand it’s broken. They understand we have to change the way we do business. The Senate is now a graveyard for good ideas, and we need to change that.”

- more -

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2013/01/25/the-morning-plum-whats-next-for-filibuster-reformers/

To some this will look like a silver lining, to others it'll seem like a pipe dream.

Updated to add the roll call: http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=113&session=1&vote=00001

I don't understand why they didn't include the talking filibuster with the measures that passed. Ending the filibuster could still have been subject to a high-vote threshold, ideally 55 votes. I'd even accept 60.

Fact is that it would be much better to have Senators defend their obstruction for all Americans to see/hear. Better to put the arguments out in the open, and then let Senators defend their vote.

Filibuster reform dead until at least 2015
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022257250




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Reply Looking for a silver lining on filibuster reform? (updated) (Original post)
ProSense Jan 2013 OP
Bay Boy Jan 2013 #1
ProSense Jan 2013 #3
BlueCaliDem Jan 2013 #6
Bay Boy Jan 2013 #7
jeff47 Jan 2013 #8
0rganism Jan 2013 #9
Romulox Jan 2013 #2
sadbear Jan 2013 #4
ProSense Jan 2013 #5
Volaris Jan 2013 #10

Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 10:05 AM

1. I think this is one of those

"careful what you wish for" things. Eventually Republicans will be back in control of the senate and we will be happy that a Democrat senator will be able to stop their nonsense with the threat of a filibuster then.

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Response to Bay Boy (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 10:08 AM

3. Doesn't matter.

"I think this is one of those 'careful what you wish for' things. Eventually Republicans will be back in control of the senate and we will be happy that a Democrat senator will be able to stop their nonsense with the threat of a filibuster then."

Republicans are the ones who have trouble defending their positions. This would have no impact on Democratic Senators.

In fact, it would strengthen their ability to make their case to the public.

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Response to Bay Boy (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 04:27 PM

6. Republicans are already "in control" of Congress.

And they're now enabled by the old guard of the RepubliDem senators like Reid and Feinstein to solidify their power.

Yeah, Senate Dems talk a good talk, but it's all about the votes, and they're the reason why our country isn't moving forward faster; why homeowners were booted out of their homes while banks paid their CEO's astronomical bonuses for jilting the American homeowner; why only rich people and corporations are allowed to have the BK courts reassess the value of their homes and get rid of the excess.

Our Congress is no longer "government of, by, or for" the people. It's become a government purely for the oligarchy.

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Response to BlueCaliDem (Reply #6)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 05:58 PM

7. What did you call Feinstein and Reid?

Huh?

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Response to Bay Boy (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 08:12 PM

8. No, if Republicans retake the majority, they'll be getting rid of the filibuster (nt)

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Response to Bay Boy (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 09:01 PM

9. what do you think is the first thing a GOP-majority senate will do?

IMHO, the day a GOP majority takes control of the senate, the filibuster is DOA.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 10:05 AM

2. Powder: DRY! nt

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 10:10 AM

4. Why is our government dysfunctional?

Is it because the rules allow for dysfunction or because our elected leaders themselves are dysfunctional?

Does it make any damned difference?

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 11:14 AM

5. Kick! n/t

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2013, 09:36 PM

10. ummmm...

"Fact is that it would be much better to have Senators defend their obstruction for all Americans to see/hear."

And you're wondering why this didn't happen.

all kiding aside, I'm pisssed that it didn't get done. You're NOT alone.

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