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Thu Jan 24, 2013, 08:36 AM

 

Dr. Oz speaks on natural antibiotics

This discussion thread was locked as off-topic by MineralMan (a host of the General Discussion forum).

http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/powerful-natural-antibiotics

18 replies, 1821 views

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Response to 2on2u (Original post)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 08:41 AM

1. Oz is a half-quack

Not everything he says is quackery, but a lot is.

An older article but still relevant from randi.org

The Media Pigasus Award goes to Dr. Mehmet Oz, who has done such a disservice to his TV viewers by promoting quack medical practices that he is now the first person to win a Pigasus two years in a row. Dr. Oz is a Harvard-educated cardiac physician who, through his syndicated TV show, has promoted faith healing, "energy medicine," and other quack theories that have no scientific basis. Oz has appeared on ABC News to give legitimacy to the claims of Brazilian faith healer “John of God,” who uses old carnival tricks to take money from the seriously ill. He's hosted Ayurvedic guru Yogi Cameron on his show to promote nonsense "tongue examination" as a way of diagnosing health problems. This year, he really went off the deep end. In March 2011, Dr. Oz endorsed "psychic" huckster and past Pigasus winner John Edward, who pretends to talk to dead people. Oz even suggested that bereaved families should visit psychic mediums to receive (faked) messages from their dead relatives as a form of grief counseling.

http://www.randi.org/site/jref-news/1260-pigasus-2011

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Response to OKNancy (Reply #1)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 08:57 AM

5. Manuka honey, first thing no one should take....

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23134461

Antibacterial Activity of Greek and Cypriot Honeys Against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Comparison to Manuka Honey.

>>All tested honeys demonstrated antibacterial activity against S. aureus on agar-well diffusion assay. MICs of tested honeys were determined as 3.125-25% (v/v), compared with manuka honey at 6.25% (v/v). Similarly, 21 of 31 tested honeys demonstrated antibacterial activity on agar-well diffusion assay against P. aeruginosa. Their MICs ranged from 6.25% to 25% (v/v) compared with 12.5% (v/v) for manuka honey. Antibacterial activity of tested honeys could be largely attributed to hydrogen peroxide formation and in some cases to unidentified proteinaceous compounds. In conclusion, Greek and Cypriot honeys demonstrated significant but variable antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa and especially S. aureus.<<

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Response to 2on2u (Reply #5)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 09:03 AM

7. lef in a sigline...

Where have we seen that before?

Hysterydiagnosis / 4moronicyears

Sid

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Response to SidDithers (Reply #7)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 09:05 AM

8. Why all the hostility? I don't get it Sid, you and me used to be tight. Nothing lasts

 

forever I guess. Since my sig so offends thee I shall pluck it out and replace it with something much more tame and bland.

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Response to 2on2u (Reply #8)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 09:18 AM

9. We were tight? What name were you using when we were tight?...nt

Sid

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Response to SidDithers (Reply #9)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 09:54 AM

10. You know, back in the day, before automobiles, in another life, you and me went back almost

 

to the beginning of time..... I kid of course.

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Response to SidDithers (Reply #7)


Response to 2on2u (Reply #5)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 10:20 AM

13. Yes, well...

Honey may well have antibacterial properties. Many things do. However, this is an in vitro study. While interesting, it is not adequate to start selling honey to people for their staph infections.

As always, people with an active staph infection should be visiting their doctor for advice, not reading advice on DU. Also, since the excerpt from that article indicates that the antibacterial action of honey may be largely attributed to hydrogen peroxide formation, it may just be that hydrogen peroxide solution, which is inexpensively available at any pharmacy or supermarket, is a better place to start with home treatment of infections. Doctors often recommend the use of hydrogen peroxide solutions for debriding wounds and for its antibacterial action. It is, however, not a substitute for an antibiotic that is matched to the bacteria that is the cause of the infection.

Not everything you read at the NIH site is a medical breakthrough that will wipe out the need for other medications. But, you have to have some background in interpreting the abstracts there and it's always advisable to actually read the complete articles, before jumping to conclusions.

Dr. Oz's website is full of advertisements. Indeed, it's wise to take his non cardiology advice with a few grains of salt. He seems to have become a supplement advocate. Perhaps that's more lucrative than his practice was.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #13)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 10:31 AM

15. A well constructed, well thought out, reasonable and proper response, on every point you

 

are spot on. There is no sarcasm intended here. Thanks for the fair and proper response.

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Response to 2on2u (Reply #15)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 10:36 AM

16. Thank you. Caution is always advisable before taking

random information from the Internet and applying it to individual situations. It's also often advisable before spreading information that may be incorrect, incomplete, or misunderstood. The Internet is full of half-baked, untested quasi-medical information. Spreading such information even further may not be the best thing to do, overall. When it is incorrect, premature, or has questionable motives, retractions never seem to get posted, leaving people with only the poor information.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #16)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 10:41 AM

17. Again, spot on, I will endeavor to tone it down several degrees since what you have just

 

stated is the undisputed truth.

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Response to 2on2u (Original post)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 08:46 AM

2. I would never take anything Dr. Oz tells me to.

Whacko!

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Response to bigwillq (Reply #2)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 09:59 AM

12. He's even talked about magnets and that woo

wtf

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Response to 2on2u (Original post)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 08:52 AM

3. I have a shelf full of things Dr Oz recommended and none of them work: megareds, rasberry ketones,

and much more. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice shame on me. No more.

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Response to 2on2u (Original post)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 08:54 AM

4. He is so full of shit on so much.





Dr. Oz’s Miraculous Medical Advice
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.

By Julia Belluz and Steven J. Hoffman

Posted Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013, at 10:08 AM ET


As people were getting ready for the holiday season and its accompanying waist expansion late last year, Dr. Mehmet Oz let viewers of his TV show in on a timely little secret. “Everybody wants to know what’s the newest, fastest fat buster,” said the board-certified cardiothoracic surgeon and one of People magazine’s sexiest men alive. “How can I burn fat without spending every waking moment exercising and dieting?”

He then told his audience about a “breakthrough,” “magic,” “holy grail,” even “revolutionary” new fat buster. “I want you to write it down,” America’s doctor urged his audience with a serious and trustworthy stare. After carefully wrapping his lips around the exotic words “Garcinia cambogia,” he added, sternly: “It may be the simple solution you’ve been looking for to bust your body fat for good.



In Dr. Oz’s New York City studio, garcinia extract—or hydroxycitric acid found in fruits like purple mangosteen—sounded fantastic, a promising new tool for the battle against flab. Outside the Oprah-ordained doctor’s sensational world of amazing new diets, there’s no real debate about whether garcinia works: The best evidence is unequivocally against it.
Advertisement

The miracle cure isn’t really a miracle at all. It’s not even new. Garcinia cambogia has been studied as a weight-loss aid for more than 15 years. A 1998 randomized controlled trial looked at the effects of garcinia as a potential “antiobesity agent” in 135 people. The conclusion: The pills were no better than placebo for weight and fat loss.

<snip and much more at:>

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/medical_examiner/2013/01/can_you_trust_dr_oz_his_medical_advice_often_conflicts_with_the_best_science.html

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Response to cali (Reply #4)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 08:59 AM

6. lol - I just posted a thread by the same authors

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Response to 2on2u (Original post)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 09:57 AM

11. A respected cardiologist turned into a quack woo woo

Ugh. I remember when he was on Oprah years ago, and was an actual doctor and very informative (it's where I learned about HFCS, years and years ago).

He sucks.

And, I doubt he tells his heart patients to take honey instead of his script antibiotics.

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Response to 2on2u (Original post)

Thu Jan 24, 2013, 12:07 PM

18. Locking: Medical advice threads do not match the GD SOP.

"Discuss politics, issues, and current events. No posts about Israel/Palestine, religion, guns, showbiz, or sports unless there is really big news. No conspiracy theories. No whining about DU."

Medical advice is not political and not a current event. It is also not an issue unless there is current news regarding a specific health matter. A consensus of GD hosts has voted to lock this thread.

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