HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » Losing my religion for eq...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Tue Jan 22, 2013, 09:40 PM

 

Losing my religion for equality. Jimmy Carter

This is a few years old but still relevant.

I HAVE been a practising Christian all my life and a deacon and Bible teacher for many years. My faith is a source of strength and comfort to me, as religious beliefs are to hundreds of millions of people around the world. So my decision to sever my ties with the Southern Baptist Convention, after six decades, was painful and difficult. It was, however, an unavoidable decision when the convention's leaders, quoting a few carefully selected Bible verses and claiming that Eve was created second to Adam and was responsible for original sin, ordained that women must be "subservient" to their husbands and prohibited from serving as deacons, pastors or chaplains in the military service.

This view that women are somehow inferior to men is not restricted to one religion or belief. Women are prevented from playing a full and equal role in many faiths. Nor, tragically, does its influence stop at the walls of the church, mosque, synagogue or temple. This discrimination, unjustifiably attributed to a Higher Authority, has provided a reason or excuse for the deprivation of women's equal rights across the world for centuries.

At its most repugnant, the belief that women must be subjugated to the wishes of men excuses slavery, violence, forced prostitution, genital mutilation and national laws that omit rape as a crime. But it also costs many millions of girls and women control over their own bodies and lives, and continues to deny them fair access to education, health, employment and influence within their own communities.
Advertisement

The impact of these religious beliefs touches every aspect of our lives. They help explain why in many countries boys are educated before girls; why girls are told when and whom they must marry; and why many face enormous and unacceptable risks in pregnancy and childbirth because their basic health needs are not met.

In some Islamic nations, women are restricted in their movements, punished for permitting the exposure of an arm or ankle, deprived of education, prohibited from driving a car or competing with men for a job. If a woman is raped, she is often most severely punished as the guilty party in the crime.

The same discriminatory thinking lies behind the continuing gender gap in pay and why there are still so few women in office in the West. The root of this prejudice lies deep in our histories, but its impact is felt every day. It is not women and girls alone who suffer. It damages all of us. The evidence shows that investing in women and girls delivers major benefits for society. An educated woman has healthier children. She is more likely to send them to school. She earns more and invests what she earns in her family.

It is simply self-defeating for any community to discriminate against half its population. We need to challenge these self-serving and outdated attitudes and practices - as we are seeing in Iran where women are at the forefront of the battle for democracy and freedom.

I understand, however, why many political leaders can be reluctant about stepping into this minefield. Religion, and tradition, are powerful and sensitive areas to challenge. But my fellow Elders and I, who come from many faiths and backgrounds, no longer need to worry about winning votes or avoiding controversy - and we are deeply committed to challenging injustice wherever we see it.

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/losing-my-religion-for-equality-20090714-dk0v.html#ixzz2IlKtO2GX

8 replies, 2049 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 8 replies Author Time Post
Reply Losing my religion for equality. Jimmy Carter (Original post)
Whovian Jan 2013 OP
niyad Jan 2013 #1
Skittles Jan 2013 #2
DirkGently Jan 2013 #3
Still Sensible Jan 2013 #4
Angry Dragon Jan 2013 #5
MindandSoul Jan 2013 #6
Laochtine Jan 2013 #7
Ken Burch Jan 2013 #8

Response to Whovian (Original post)

Tue Jan 22, 2013, 09:42 PM

1. k and r

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Whovian (Original post)

Tue Jan 22, 2013, 09:43 PM

2. K&R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Whovian (Original post)

Tue Jan 22, 2013, 09:48 PM

3. ... and that is what principled religious practice looks like.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Whovian (Original post)

Tue Jan 22, 2013, 09:52 PM

4. K & R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Whovian (Original post)

Tue Jan 22, 2013, 10:30 PM

5. In my opinion Jimmy has always lived his religion

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Whovian (Original post)

Tue Jan 22, 2013, 11:16 PM

6. What a good, fair and thoughtful man!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Whovian (Original post)

Tue Jan 22, 2013, 11:23 PM

7. easily the most thoughtful President

That is all

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Whovian (Original post)

Tue Jan 22, 2013, 11:39 PM

8. Well...given the thread title...is it appropriate to post this in tribute to the man?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread