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Sat Jan 19, 2013, 09:29 PM

Can guns be an addiction?

Listening to the visceral reactions from those that oppose any sort of gun reform, makes me wonder if their intense response is from an addiction to guns. Much the same as cigs, alcohol or drugs. It's as if these people can't get enough guns to own and then still want bigger, better and more powerful.

While I hear some say it's their freedoms that they don't want to lose, it sounds somewhat hollow to me.... I think it's just a handy excuse to use, to keep all their "toys".

What are your thoughts on this?

27 replies, 1622 views

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Arrow 27 replies Author Time Post
Reply Can guns be an addiction? (Original post)
Isoldeblue Jan 2013 OP
ZombieHorde Jan 2013 #1
Isoldeblue Jan 2013 #10
MightyMopar Jan 2013 #2
PoliticAverse Jan 2013 #3
Isoldeblue Jan 2013 #6
PoliticAverse Jan 2013 #9
Isoldeblue Jan 2013 #11
elleng Jan 2013 #4
petronius Jan 2013 #5
Isoldeblue Jan 2013 #13
petronius Jan 2013 #17
Isoldeblue Jan 2013 #19
petronius Jan 2013 #20
Isoldeblue Jan 2013 #21
petronius Jan 2013 #24
moondust Jan 2013 #7
Robyn66 Jan 2013 #8
Comrade_McKenzie Jan 2013 #12
morningfog Jan 2013 #14
tjwash Jan 2013 #15
cherokeeprogressive Jan 2013 #16
jmg257 Jan 2013 #18
Incitatus Jan 2013 #22
madinmaryland Jan 2013 #23
Eleanors38 Jan 2013 #25
Nay Jan 2013 #26
joopdoop1 Feb 2013 #27

Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 09:31 PM

1. I think guns can be like Pokemon cards.

I think some people see them as a "cool thing" to collect. In my opinion, gun collectors are just another type of nerd.

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Response to ZombieHorde (Reply #1)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 10:10 PM

10. Consider the comparison though....

What value do Pokemon cards represent, compared to guns? They don't have power or enable one to have control over life and death for man or animal.... What do guns represent to gun lovers? Looking at that makes me wonder, if that is what triggers an addiction to guns?

I really am curious as to why a large number of people place such a high value on guns and act as if they can't do with out them. It's as if their lives would somehow spin out of control, if they couldn't be free to buy as many and of any variety, just for the sake of owning it and using it. Much the same as with substance abuse or something as mundane as cigarettes, which was, at one time, an accepted, but necessary use and habit.

I do believe that culture plays a huge part and may be just what enables the possible addiction. It's something that can be shared with friends and other enthusiasts, so that validates the wanting of more guns to own.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 09:34 PM

2. This one very good reason for the CDC to get involved!

 

Blue
by Joni Mitchell Printer-friendly version of this lyric

Blue songs are like tattoos
You know I've been to sea before
Crown and anchor me
Or let me sail away
Hey Blue, here is a song for you
Ink on a pin
Underneath the skin
An empty space to fill in
Well there're so many sinking now
You've got to keep thinking
You can make it thru these waves
Acid, booze, and ass
Needles, guns, and grass
Lots of laughs lots of laughs
Everybody's saying that hell's the hippest way to go
Well I don't think so
But I'm gonna take a look around it though
Blue I love you.

http://jonimitchell.com/music/song.cfm?id=182

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 09:46 PM

3. Would you consider Jay Leno 'addicted to cars' ?

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Response to PoliticAverse (Reply #3)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 09:52 PM

6. Absolutely, yes. I don't mean that in a bad way...........

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Response to Isoldeblue (Reply #6)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 09:57 PM

9. "Collecting items can trigger obsessive-compulsive disorder"

Whatever you collect - porcelain dolls, precious stones, shoes, thimbles, watches or fans - your hobby could easily become a psychological disorder that European researchers say affects more than 10 percent of the population.

The researchers, from Granada University, say that as long as collectors exercise some control, then "collecting items is good from a psychological point of view, as it helps in developing positive skills and attitudes such as perseverance, order, patience and memory."

http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/20110216183956data_trunc_sys.shtml

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Response to PoliticAverse (Reply #9)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 10:21 PM

11. But can you see a difference in people's reaction, feeling threatened with losing their guns...

compared to those that may face a risk in losing their collections of another item. Harmless items, that have no power in of themselves?

I believe that I am seeing a completely different reaction. And I'm not sure what to make of it.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 09:47 PM

4. They've been a habit and cultural attribute, in some places, compare urban/rural,

but now that gun-makers' $$$ is so apparent and in some jeopardy, propagandists (NRA+) have taken hold, and are convincing many that their 'freedom,' lives, and 'life-styles' are at stake, very much like tea-bugger' movement. IMO.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 09:51 PM

5. With the caveat that I have no psychology expertise, it would seem to me that

a compulsive hoarding behavior could manifest as an excessive attachment to firearms, but probably not at a rate anywhere close to enough to influence public dialog on the topic...

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Response to petronius (Reply #5)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 10:32 PM

13. I disagree

Unless you are not for any sort of gun reform, then you won't either.
I am seeing something that scares me. And if we are to make any sort of change in our gun laws, we will need to have a dialogue with people who are gun lovers.

I feel it goes beyond just the brainwashing lies from the NRA, neo-cons and Fox. I think it runs far deeper on an extremely personal level.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Reply #13)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 11:04 PM

17. Dialogue is great. But when you're coming up with clinical explanations for

the opinions of "gun lovers," who exactly are you inviting to the conversation?

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Response to petronius (Reply #17)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 11:21 PM

19. Anyone

I've only used the word, "addiction", which isn't all that clinical and is fairly understood by most people. It was you who brought up the clinical term, "compulsive hoarding behavior".

As I've said, I see the reactions as a different beast, then to other issues. Being aware of that, IF, it's true, is something that may be vital to those who are active in reforming gun laws, in how some are dealt with.

It's a thought that has been buzzing in my mind the last few days and thought I'd toss it out here to hear what others saw and thought.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Reply #19)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 11:39 PM

20. Addiction is a clinical thing, and not trivial

If you only meant it in a casual and colloquial sense, you'll be insulting people to no purpose. But if you wonder whether true psychological addiction to firearms occurs at a rate sufficient to influence the national discussion, then my best guess is 'no', and I've seen no evidence to suggest otherwise.

I agree with you that an open and honest discussion about why people might choose to own and use firearms, and why they might resent/resist new gun control measures is of value. But I think that your approach it - basically suggesting that 'gun love' has its roots in illness - is counterproductive...

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Response to petronius (Reply #20)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 11:55 PM

21. That is not what I meant at all

You're taking my words, "gun love", out of context, I think. There are many levels of addiction. And seeing and reading the way some people are about their guns, makes me wonder....
I guess I don't express myself as well as I'd like.

This touches on what I mean:
"Clinton stressed that guns present different cultural complexities than other political issues.

"Do not patronize the passionate supporters of your opponents by looking down your nose at them," he said, according to Politico."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/19/bill-clinton-guns-_n_2512588.html

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Response to Isoldeblue (Reply #21)

Sun Jan 20, 2013, 12:56 AM

24. Perhaps I'm reading too much into it, because I do agree with President Clinton, and

with your point about the need for dialogue. In a general sense, I think really trying to understand why people might choose to own firearms, and in what ways they might feel threatened by tightened laws, is an admirable goal.

Unfortunately, so much of the discourse has been poisoned already by stereotypes and insults: small penis, child-killer, paranoid, et al are obvious conversation-enders, and I think "addict" risks being part of that list. On the flip side, epithets like authoritarian, gun-grabbing, control freak, etc. are generally not heard as an invitation to a friendly chat.

So the bottom line is you're right that an honest conversation can only help - and everybody could benefit by examining what they say, and listening at least as much as they talk...

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 09:54 PM

7. Kinda like that.

I think it becomes an identity thing for many, like a pickup truck or a motorcycle.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 09:55 PM

8. YES YES YES

Guns can be what small cruel men use to gain power over people. Its the guns that give them that power. It most definitely is like a drug. They go from being miserable unhappy people to loud menacing violent people who literally are holding life in their hands. Add alcohol to the mix and you have a real party!

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 10:26 PM

12. Possibly. Maybe we can put them in rehabilitation facilities and turn them into decent people. nt

 

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 10:39 PM

14. Yes. Anything can be. Especially when adreniline is involved.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 10:41 PM

15. I've seen people completely obsessed with their gun collections - so yes.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 10:54 PM

16. Nnnnnnope

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 11:10 PM

18. Of course. Like any other item people may covet...

Guns, guitars, beane babies, trains, dolls etc. etc.

For whatever reasons some people like guns...the history, the engineering, the excitement of getting something new, feeling of power, a way to reduce fear. And these days what they obviously represent to so many...independence, a right, even defiance of authority.

Not so sure about bigger and more powerful, though like 'the best' it can be a motivation...but not as much as simply 'I want what I want when I want it'.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 11:58 PM

22. They can definitely be an obsession.

I don't know the specifics of the clinical definitions, but there seem to be similarities.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sun Jan 20, 2013, 12:02 AM

23. Yes. I also believe that many NRA apologists show many signs of mental illness and

based on their own comments should not be allowed to own or possess any firearms.

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Response to madinmaryland (Reply #23)

Sun Jan 20, 2013, 04:36 AM

25. Ah, the beauty of psychology: Anyone can play the game, and the loser gets punished righteously.

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Response to Isoldeblue (Original post)

Sun Jan 20, 2013, 10:15 AM

26. I think fear can be an addiction. nt

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Response to Nay (Reply #26)

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