HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » Deaf Twins Pick Euthanasi...

Mon Jan 14, 2013, 08:40 PM

Deaf Twins Pick Euthanasia Over Going Blind; Couldn’t Bear Not Seeing Each Other

Wow... I just don't know what to think about this...euthanasia is such a difficult topic to start with. But, brothers, blindness, no pain... jeeeez. I just don't know!


Deaf Twins Pick Euthanasia Over Going Blind; Couldn’t Bear Not Seeing Each Other

Deaf twin brothers Marc and Eddy Verbessem of Belgium decided to end their lives in tandem rather than go blind.

The 45-year-olds, who lived and worked as cobblers together their entire adult lives, were doomed to blindness by a genetic form of glaucoma, and couldn't bear the thought of being unable to see each other, according to their family.

Their older brother Dirk and their parents, Mary and Remy, attempted to talk them out of it, but were eventually persuaded that it was for the best.

It took the brothers two years, but they eventually found a doctor willing to perform the lethal injection.

http://gawker.com/5975946/deaf-twins-pick-euthanasia-over-going-blind-couldnt-bear-not-seeing-each-other

7 replies, 952 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 7 replies Author Time Post
Reply Deaf Twins Pick Euthanasia Over Going Blind; Couldn’t Bear Not Seeing Each Other (Original post)
DonRedwood Jan 2013 OP
REP Jan 2013 #1
DonRedwood Jan 2013 #4
MotherPetrie Jan 2013 #2
Kalidurga Jan 2013 #3
DreamGypsy Jan 2013 #5
kooljerk666 Jan 2013 #6
DreamGypsy Jan 2013 #7

Response to DonRedwood (Original post)

Mon Jan 14, 2013, 08:48 PM

1. They used a sign language they had devised, only known to them and their family

They had other severe health problems as well.

Being completely cut off from the world and totally dependent ...

I would not wish that on anyone, and have only sympathy for them and their family. I wish them all peace.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to REP (Reply #1)

Mon Jan 14, 2013, 09:10 PM

4. Such a hard time for their family I am sure.

And I too wish them peace.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DonRedwood (Original post)

Mon Jan 14, 2013, 08:53 PM

2. Heartbreaking

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DonRedwood (Original post)

Mon Jan 14, 2013, 08:53 PM

3. Tragic either way...

I don't want to get into a lot of detail, but a dog lost his nose saving a girls life. That story makes me so sad for that poor dog. Smell is even more important to a dog than vision is to humans.

I feel for these brothers not being able to see and already being deaf is tragic. But, so is the fact that they felt there was nothing else for them if they couldn't see.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DonRedwood (Original post)

Mon Jan 14, 2013, 10:25 PM

5. Wisdom, strength, courage, and opportunity

Basing an opinion or comment about a case of euthanasia on anything other than personal involvement is probably a very bad idea, but here goes.

From the statements in the articles I think these two gentlemen had a great understanding of their mutual situation and of what mattered in their lives. They had the wisdom to reach a conclusion on a course of action that would be most fulfilling of their lives. They had the strength and compassion to reconcile their decision with the shock, confusion, and probable anger felt by their family and friends, until all were accepting of the answer. They had the courage to spend 2 years living with their decision, while they struggled to find a doctor who understood the depth of their reasons for pursuing the path they choose. Marc and Eddy were fortunate to live in a country that gave them an opportunity to make a decision about their own lives and to act on that decision.

Now, pure speculation. When I read the story my first thoughts were...having spent 45 years together and knowing the challenges they would soon face with blindness and apparently other health issues, they would have asked each other that very hard question, "What will you do when I die?" And each brother would probably have answered that he would have no reason to live. So, let it be together.


My father died from consequences of dementia, probably Alzheimer's though no autopsy was done. He was a PhD chemical engineer and nuclear scientist. My family, mos ly my mother, had to observe as, over several years, he lost first his social, then mental, then physical abilities. The time between his descent into an essentially vegetative state until his death was too long. My older brother, only 65, is now in a care facility on a similar trajectory. Stories like this are commonplace. I suggest to my wife, that when I can no longer appreciate her, our dogs, music, beer, and being out in the beauty of the natural world, then she should mail me out of town. It's only half joking. I hope that our society becomes more enlightened so that if that day comes, the appropriate postage will be available: wisdom, strength, courage, opportunity.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DreamGypsy (Reply #5)

Tue Jan 15, 2013, 06:30 AM

6. Being helpless & alone is a pretty big & scary future..............

 

I have some reason to worry. I have had a few dozen concussions & am will be prone to the kind of dementia football players get.

What worry's me is when things get bad enuff to quit, I will not know anything is wrong, it is easy enuff to go into Philly & get enuff pain killers to end it, but i will not know what or why or how or where am I?!

I would like to see a means where i could mandate now, that if/when I go senile, I get put to sleep. I do not want to waste money on diapers or make anyone deal with that kind of crap.

I am not a big PBS fan but here is an interesting story they did Nov 2012 on assisted suicides in the US.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2012/11/the-suicide-plan-frontline-explores-organized-world-of-assisted-suicide.html

Washington & Oregon are the only state where this is legal currently.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kooljerk666 (Reply #6)

Tue Jan 15, 2013, 09:35 AM

7. Yes, it is.

Good morning, KJ,

The situations involving dementia or other loses of the ability to communicate one's decisions are the hardest.

I am in Oregon, where we have the state Death with Dignity Act. It clearly doesn't cover all cases, but it is a start. Apparently Montana now has a law as well as Washington state, but I don't know details.

Information is available here:http://public.health.oregon.gov/ProviderPartnerResources/EvaluationResearch/DeathwithDignityAct/Pages/faqs.aspx#whocan

Q: Who can participate in the Act?

A: The law states that, in order to participate, a patient must be: 1) 18 years of age or older, 2) a resident of Oregon, 3) capable of making and communicating health care decisions for him/herself, and 4) diagnosed with a terminal illness that will lead to death within six (6) months. It is up to the attending physician to determine whether these criteria have been met.

Q: Can a patient's family members request participation in the Act on behalf of the patient (for example, in cases where the patient is comatose)?

A: No. The law requires that the patient ask to participate voluntarily on his or her own behalf.


Certain physicians are willing to work with their patients who must be residents of Oregon, but there is no minimum length of time for residency.

More info at the link.

Safe home.

- DreamGypsy

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread