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Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:11 PM

Greetings, DUers! Ready for your Friday Afternoon Challenge? Here it is: “Illuminations.”

Illumination has been a subject and condition of art since the Lascaux cave painters. Now at midwinter let us identify these works of the optical sublime...

Good luck, and of course...no cheating..

1.


2.


3.


4.


5.


6.

72 replies, 4132 views

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Reply Greetings, DUers! Ready for your Friday Afternoon Challenge? Here it is: “Illuminations.” (Original post)
CTyankee Jan 2013 OP
jberryhill Jan 2013 #1
Liberal_in_LA Jan 2013 #2
CTyankee Jan 2013 #4
jberryhill Jan 2013 #6
CTyankee Jan 2013 #9
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #59
jberryhill Jan 2013 #60
CTyankee Jan 2013 #63
annabanana Jan 2013 #3
CTyankee Jan 2013 #5
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #7
CTyankee Jan 2013 #8
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #11
IcyPeas Jan 2013 #10
CTyankee Jan 2013 #14
JDPriestly Jan 2013 #26
Nye Bevan Jan 2013 #12
CTyankee Jan 2013 #15
cthulu2016 Jan 2013 #13
CTyankee Jan 2013 #17
cthulu2016 Jan 2013 #20
CTyankee Jan 2013 #21
cthulu2016 Jan 2013 #16
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #18
CTyankee Jan 2013 #19
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #22
CTyankee Jan 2013 #30
CrazyOrangeCat Jan 2013 #54
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #23
CTyankee Jan 2013 #28
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #34
ellisonz Jan 2013 #24
CTyankee Jan 2013 #31
ellisonz Jan 2013 #35
CTyankee Jan 2013 #37
Botany Jan 2013 #25
psychmommy Jan 2013 #27
CTyankee Jan 2013 #29
psychmommy Jan 2013 #33
CTyankee Jan 2013 #36
CTyankee Jan 2013 #32
yardwork Jan 2013 #38
CTyankee Jan 2013 #39
yardwork Jan 2013 #43
CTyankee Jan 2013 #49
yardwork Jan 2013 #53
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #40
CTyankee Jan 2013 #42
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #50
CTyankee Jan 2013 #51
democrat in Tallahassee Jan 2013 #41
CTyankee Jan 2013 #44
democrat in Tallahassee Jan 2013 #46
CTyankee Jan 2013 #48
mwdem Jan 2013 #45
CTyankee Jan 2013 #47
mwdem Jan 2013 #52
CTyankee Jan 2013 #55
mwdem Jan 2013 #56
pinboy3niner Jan 2013 #57
CTyankee Jan 2013 #62
yardwork Jan 2013 #69
CTyankee Jan 2013 #70
lapislzi Jan 2013 #58
CTyankee Jan 2013 #64
CTyankee Jan 2013 #66
lapislzi Jan 2013 #67
CTyankee Jan 2013 #68
WinkyDink Jan 2013 #61
CTyankee Jan 2013 #65
entanglement Jan 2013 #71
CTyankee Jan 2013 #72

Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:14 PM

1. #2 is by that Dutch guy

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:15 PM

2. lol

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:25 PM

4. It isn't the Dutch guy...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:50 PM

6. Okay, maybe that Belgian or Flemish guy

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #6)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:56 PM

9. strike out!

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 09:08 PM

59. #5 is *TA-DA!* that Dutch guy

See #57.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #59)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 10:27 PM

60. Thank goodness

I thought I was losing my touch

Yeah. That guy who painted all that stuff.

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #60)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 01:00 AM

63. No, I knew all along that you hadn't...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:18 PM

3. #5 looks like a Caravaggio. . .

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Response to annabanana (Reply #3)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:25 PM

5. it does, but no...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:54 PM

7. #2: Georges de la Tour - The New Born Child nt

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #7)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:55 PM

8. pretty much screams de la Tour, doesn't it?

Do you like this artist?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #8)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:10 PM

11. I like Caravaggio better

But what I know about art wouldn't fill a thimble.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 05:58 PM

10. number 1 is a degas

the woman in blue with the veil gives it away for me. Also the horse. He has a few paintings with horses.

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Response to IcyPeas (Reply #10)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:24 PM

14. Very good! It IS an early Degas...altho I just don't know how you got it from the woman in blue

with the veil...I wouldn't have known this had it not been pointed out to me...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #14)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:24 PM

26. I couldn't guess it, but on review, the fall of the fabric in the veil is a giveaway.

It looks like the netting on a ballet tutu. Maybe that is why Degas liked to paint dancers. He liked to paint the fall of the fabric. I'm just guessing for fun.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:16 PM

12. #3 is a Thomas Kinkade.

Well I'm pretty sure. I hope I am not displaying my ignorance of art here.

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Response to Nye Bevan (Reply #12)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:28 PM

15. It isn't Kinkade altho maybe Kinkade liked this artist. I don't really know since I don't know that

much about him.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:18 PM

13. #4 could be one of a few American western artists

Frank Tenney Johnson? But it has a bit more... vitality than most Johnsons. They are Johnson stars though.

But would you feature someone that relatively minor? Hmmm. I don't want to say Remington, though it could be... it's his kind of thing, even down to the scratchy vigorous excution. Maybe Couse.

But I'll guess Johnson because he made his career on those distinctive green nights, and is thus statistically the best guess. (He did more green night with stars paintings than anyone else.)

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Response to cthulu2016 (Reply #13)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:29 PM

17. Interesting response and of course, you have a background in this art. not johnson, tho...but...

you are on the right track...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #17)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:36 PM

20. Okay... I'll revert to my first guess

Johnson got the green night thing from Remington, so I should have just guessed Remington but I wanted to show off.

The thing is, Johnson was a heavy painter... thick paint. Remington was not. So the scratchiness and exposed under-paint, and the iconic/simple image, and the fascination with encounters at water holes, and the thinness of the wolf (Remington like thin things, not rounded things) are all Remington and I outsmarted myself.

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Response to cthulu2016 (Reply #20)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:39 PM

21. Great analysis! I thought it looked a lot like what we now call photorealism. Or maybe he was

trying for something like that, even back in the late 19th century. Like most Americans I think of Remington's cowboy, bucking horses type of art but this just struck me as interesting. Evidently, he did a number of night time paintings but the ones I saw all had dudes in cowboy attire around campfires which would have been pretty simple...this caught my eye with the green effect.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)


Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:32 PM

18. #4: Remington - Moonlight Wolf nt

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #18)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:33 PM

19. there ya go, pinboy! What gave it away to you?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #19)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:41 PM

22. He was one possibility, but I wasn't at all sure

I searched on the subject rather than trying to search by artist.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #22)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:44 PM

30. it's very interesting that the artist had this fascination with night painting...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #30)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:32 PM

54. I really like that one; it is unique.

I have always liked night scenes, both painted and photographed.

Thanks.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 06:59 PM

23. #6: Francisco de Zurbarán - St. Francis nt

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #23)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:36 PM

28. indeed. do you like zubaran?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #28)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:56 PM

34. His depictions of monks are interesting

I hadn't run across his work before today.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:13 PM

24. Nada

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Response to ellisonz (Reply #24)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:49 PM

31. Oh, I'm sorry. I don't want anybody to feel down about the Challenge. Don't worry, next week

may have something you studied in art history or art appreciation and you'll recall it...a lot of folks here do that...art will simply enrich and save your life, trust me!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #31)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:57 PM

35. I hope so!

I unfortunately never took an art history course

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Response to ellisonz (Reply #35)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:59 PM

37. That's ok, I'll give you some mini-courses with my Challenges! Hopefully, you'll love it so much

you'll start Googling and god knows what will happen to you then!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:18 PM

25. You forgot the greatest work ever of the illuminated genre

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:27 PM

27. Thank u for giving me a greater appreciation of art.

These posts are great. i look forward to this.

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Response to psychmommy (Reply #27)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:38 PM

29. thanks! Did you take art appreciation in school? I find lots of people here telling me that

they took art history or art appreciation as an elective as an undergrad and never forgot the experience! It's wonderful!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #29)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:53 PM

33. nope, plus I partied alot and vaguely remember my undergrad years. . lol

It wasn't my talent and I couldn't relate. Now I am old and mellow, I can appreciate it now.

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Response to psychmommy (Reply #33)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:57 PM

36. welll, here we are! I came to this kind of art fascination pretty late, too.

I had already gotten a Master's in Liberal Studies where I had done an Independent Study on Caravaggio. When I retired a few years later, I fell in love with art entirely. Hence, my fascination and these Challenges!

Also, it keeps my brain from atrophying...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 07:52 PM

32. #s 3 and 5 are left! Let's hear it from you, folks...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:03 PM

38. #3 reminds me of Thomas Hardy's novels. Is it a 19th century painting?

Really amazing scene.

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Response to yardwork (Reply #38)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:07 PM

39. It is 19th century but I am not connecting to Hardy...but I never read hardy so I don't know...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #39)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:10 PM

43. The opening scene of The Return of the Native describes a peasant bonfire celebration.

This doesn't look like a celebration, though.

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Response to yardwork (Reply #43)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:24 PM

49. Oh, thanks for that info! It is good to know!

but it IS interesting to see how one artist or one artiistic school influences another art movement...perhaps this is one of those cases...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #49)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:30 PM

53. Millet's painting was done in 1874. The Return of the Native was published in 1878.

It is possible that Hardy's novel was influenced by that painting!

This is so interesting. I love the Friday Challenge!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:08 PM

40. #3: Jean-François Millet - Hunting Birds at Night

It took me a long time to figure out what was going on here. Eventually the birds and the clubs made me think of bird hunting.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #40)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:09 PM

42. good for you! Interesting work, isn't it?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #42)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:24 PM

50. It's very unusual

I looked up some more information on it:

Philadelphia Museum of Art: Handbook of the Collections

This haunting and strange picture--brutishly literal yet terrifyingly generic--is the final painting by Jean-François Millet, a remarkable last testament by one of the most profound artists of the nineteenth century. He drew on his own boyhood experiences in depicting the subject of bird's-nesters, who would hunt great flocks of pigeons at night by blinding them with torchlight and then clubbing them to death. By the 1870s Millet's paintings of rural life were among the most famous in France. His subjects are nearly all drawn from the peasantry, done just as the countryside was being depopulated by immigration to the new industrial centers. But unlike many other artists who worked in the very popular specialty of "peasant painting," Millet's great genius was his ability to bond his subjects to their native place while simultaneously elevating them to a level of universal humanity. Much of his success was based on his evocation of a communal memory of a lost rural world that was either arcadian or pathetic or a combination of both. Joseph J. Rishel, from Philadelphia Museum of Art: Handbook of the Collections (1995), p. 197.

http://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/102872.html


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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #50)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:29 PM

51. a lovely description of this very strange work. It almost seems desperate. What drove people to

such means and ends for their very subsistence?

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:09 PM

41. #5 looks like Artemesia Gentileschi

She was a follower or Caravaggio. On the other hand, something reminds me of Judith Leyster in Holland--maybe the musical instruments but I don't think she was that into chiaroscuro.

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Response to democrat in Tallahassee (Reply #41)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:12 PM

44. it does look like Gentileschi but it is not hers...and I don't think of Leyster into chiaracuro

either. I saw her work on an art intensive in the Netherlands in 2011...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #44)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:18 PM

46. I do like Leyster though

And I admire Gentileschi (and Leyster) too. It was not easy for a woman to become an artist.

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Response to democrat in Tallahassee (Reply #46)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:21 PM

48. Oh, I adore both of them. Brave women all. And they did good! (my mouse pad is a Leyster

flower work that I bought in the gift shop in the Frans Hals House Museum in Haarlem...)

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:12 PM

45. Where's the gd Kincaid?

He was the Painter of Light? Am I not right?

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Response to mwdem (Reply #45)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:19 PM

47. well, in a word, no.

paintings of effects of light, as I said in my OP, go back to the Lascaux artists who positioned their images to catch the rays of the sun at winter solstice. Then we have stained glass windows in medieval Europe light, Muslim radiance, Romantic landscape artists, and the "scientific data" of the French Impressionists...and on and on.

Historical perspective informs...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #47)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:30 PM

52. You do know I'm kidding, right?

I do love your post.

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Response to mwdem (Reply #52)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:34 PM

55. well, no, I don't know how serious anyone coming here is. So I don't want to say anything that is

not nice, but I want to emphasize the positives. This is a gentle place and I don't want to put anyone down for their questions about what I have posted. I hope I didn't come across too harsh (my hubby thinks I came across too strong).

thank you for your kind words. I'm glad you like the Challenge!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #55)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:43 PM

56. Sorry...I was being flippant

I love Caravaggio and his use of shadows and illuminations.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 08:53 PM

57. #5: Hendrick ter Brugghen - The Concert

That was tough! (And my final search even turned up a Kincade, lol!)

More info on this painting:

This painting has a strong claim to be ter Brugghen's finest treatment of a secular subject. He has taken a scene favoured by Caravaggio and his Roman followers - a group of flamboyantly dressed musicians seen by candlelight - and treated it in his own distinctive manner, placing the dramatically lit half-length figures against a light background.

Paintings of the same subject by Caravaggio (New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art) and Bartolommeo Manfredi (Florence, Uffizi) are among the prototypes for this composition. Their large-scale, half-length figures, their crowding together within the composition and their closeness to the edge of the canvas, as well as the bright, colourful palette can all be found in this painting. Ter Brugghen brings to this existing format an individual fluency in modelling the soft edges of his forms and a remarkable subtlety of palette.

http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/hendrick-ter-brugghen-the-concert


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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #57)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 12:59 AM

62. Utrecht Caravaggisti, a fascinating group...

after they died out Caravaggio slipped out of favor until the early 20th century. Ruskin had hated him. Then he was rediscovered and is now the most popular artist in the U.S. (according to some). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utrecht_Caravaggism

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #62)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 10:00 AM

69. This was a good choice - it was hard to figure out!

I was all over the google last night trying to figure out if this was Caravaggio or one of his contemporaries. I even scanned images of Rembrandt - I just couldn't figure it out.

Another beautiful and fun challenge for a Friday night!

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Response to yardwork (Reply #69)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 11:37 AM

70. glad you liked it! Another one next week...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 09:07 PM

58. oooh, pick me...

#1...Odilon Redon? I know the painting, and I know it's from they Symbolist school. Wish I could remember more, as this is one of my favorite periods of art.

#2 Georges de la Tour.

#3 Courbet?

#5 Caravaggio (studied intently by de la Tour, above)

Thanks for a fun challenge, as always, CTY

...your friend in NY

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Response to lapislzi (Reply #58)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 01:03 AM

64. glad to see you! looks like de la Tour has his followers here at DU tonight...

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Response to lapislzi (Reply #58)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 06:51 AM

66. #1 is entitled Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet The Source

Interesting early work by the artist and here is a link on it:

http://archive.org/details/brooklynmuseum-o4393-portrait-of-mlle-fiocre-in-the-ballet

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #66)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 08:54 AM

67. Thank you! I'm ashamed...I should have known that.

I studied Degas pretty heavily. Of course that was 30 years ago. This painting, which includes some of his favorite subject matter (horses, ballet, bathers), foreshadows by 20 years his Symbolist compositions.

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Response to lapislzi (Reply #67)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 09:18 AM

68. Hey, I would never have guessed Degas just by looking at this painting. Without some

background, I didn't put together the thematic approaches altogether (horse, ballet, bathers as you point out). It was pretty mysterious to me, so I have learned something....

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 11:13 PM

61. #6 = St. Francis, by Zurbaran.

I knew it was of St. Francis, and went from there.

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Response to WinkyDink (Reply #61)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 01:07 AM

65. The title I have is "St Francis in Ecstasy" altho I think he looks dead...

his skin pallor is the same as his robe...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 02:25 AM

71. I should have guessed St Francis, having seen one before. Morbidity and decay were certainly on the

artist's mind.



Great "challenge", as usual

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Response to entanglement (Reply #71)

Tue Jan 15, 2013, 07:12 PM

72. thank you for the kind words! That one is kinda scary...

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