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Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:01 PM

Did you know who was the real "Rosie the Riveter"?



Geraldine Hoff Doyle, was a 17-year-old (in 1942) while she was working at the American Broach & Machine Co. when a photographer snapped a picture of her on the job. That image was used by J. Howard Miller for the “We Can Do It!” poster, released during World War II.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geraldine_Doyle

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Reply Did you know who was the real "Rosie the Riveter"? (Original post)
Playinghardball Jan 2013 OP
Scuba Jan 2013 #1
phantom power Jan 2013 #2
karpool Jan 2013 #3
Playinghardball Jan 2013 #4
karpool Jan 2013 #5
snooper2 Jan 2013 #7
Victor_c3 Jan 2013 #8
RebelOne Jan 2013 #9
Brickbat Jan 2013 #6
Javaman Jan 2013 #10
HomerRamone Jan 2013 #11

Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:10 PM

1. Thank you Gerry!

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:17 PM

2. that is cool

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:20 PM

3. Was she a freind of Kilroy's?

 

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Response to karpool (Reply #3)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:53 PM

4. Did you know this about Kilroy?


Engraving of Kilroy on the WWII Memorial in Washington DC

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Response to Playinghardball (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:54 PM

5. Yeah, that is pretty cool

 

A national monument with an easter egg.

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Response to Playinghardball (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:55 PM

7. Was he Kiljoy's cousin or brother?

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Response to Playinghardball (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:55 PM

8. was that intentional or was that an act of graffiti?

Cool either way...

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Response to Playinghardball (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:56 PM

9. Yep, my stepfather had a plastic statue in the 1940s

of a pregnant girl and the bottom of the statue was engraved "Kilroy Was Here."

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 01:54 PM

6. She died a couple of weeks ago.

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/913915--woman-whose-image-inspired-wwii-s-rosie-the-riveter-dies

But the woman in the patriotic poster was never named Rosie, nor was she a riveter. All along it was Mrs. Doyle, who after graduating from high school in Ann Arbor, Mich., took a job at a metal factory, her family said.

One day, a photographer representing United Press International came to her factory and captured Doyle leaning over a piece of machinery and wearing a red and white polka-dot bandanna over her hair.

In early 1942, the Westinghouse Corp. commissioned artist J. Howard Miller to produce several morale-boosting posters to be displayed inside its buildings. The project was funded by the government as a way to motivate workers and perhaps recruit new ones for the war effort.

Smitten with the UPI photo, Miller reportedly was said to have decided to base one of his posters on the anonymous, slender metal worker — Doyle.

For four decades, this fact escaped Doyle, who shortly after the photo was taken left her job at the factory. She barely lasted two weeks.

A cellist, Doyle was horrified to learn that a previous worker at the factory had badly injured her hands working at the machines. She found safer employment at a soda fountain and bookshop in Ann Arbor, where she wooed a young dental school student and later became his wife.

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 02:55 PM

10. Anti-strike campaign...

from the same wiki article...

That image — re-imagined by graphic artist J. Howard Miller while working for the Westinghouse Company's War Production Coordinating Committee — may have become the basis for the poster Miller created during a Westinghouse anti-absenteeism and anti-strike campaign

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 04:08 PM

11. I always thought Tyne Daly

in the CAGNEY AND LACEY days was a dead ringer for Rosie the Riveter

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