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Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:33 AM

 

Can someone recommend a good book on the Russian Revolution....

I'm looking to read some good history on the causes and outcomes of the Russian Revolution of 1917. Can someone please give me some titles?

Thanks.

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Arrow 15 replies Author Time Post
Reply Can someone recommend a good book on the Russian Revolution.... (Original post)
IWelcome TheirHatred Jan 2013 OP
Xipe Totec Jan 2013 #1
NWHarkness Jan 2013 #2
IWelcome TheirHatred Jan 2013 #4
leveymg Jan 2013 #3
el_bryanto Jan 2013 #5
leveymg Jan 2013 #7
el_bryanto Jan 2013 #8
IWelcome TheirHatred Jan 2013 #6
leveymg Jan 2013 #10
leveymg Jan 2013 #12
MountainLaurel Jan 2013 #9
IWelcome TheirHatred Jan 2013 #11
MountainLaurel Jan 2013 #14
QC Jan 2013 #13
NoPasaran Jan 2013 #15

Response to IWelcome TheirHatred (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:38 AM

1. Try Wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_Revolution

Check the reference section for further reading.

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Response to IWelcome TheirHatred (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:40 AM

2. Orlando Figes' A People's Tragedy

Gives a broad overview, but also follows particular individuals lives through the events of the Revolution and the Civil War.

Some people think Figes leans to the right, but I found him fair and even handed.

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Response to NWHarkness (Reply #2)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:50 AM

4. I was looking at that title online...

 

also was looking at Leon Trotsky's account "History of the Russian Revolution", did you read that also?

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Response to IWelcome TheirHatred (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:49 AM

3. There are a couple types to read together: autobiographies (Trotsky, Reed) and modern sociological

works (Skocpol, Goldstone). The autobiographies will give you a feel for the immediate passions that drove the participants, and the later analytical works serve as an objective overview of factors such as rising prices, a youthful population, unemployment, losses and privations in the War, landlessness, industrialization, the role of traditional organizations, etc. and a theoretical framework to view them in.

Enjoy. One of my favorite subjects.

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Response to leveymg (Reply #3)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:52 AM

5. There was a really good book

About art in the new soviet russia - well popular culture. And I can't find it - but I thought it was fascinating - how the art flourished briefly into really modernist styles, before being reigned back in and put in the service of the state.

Bryant

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Response to el_bryanto (Reply #5)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:57 AM

7. Google: Russian Futurists.

There's lot's out there on the web. We have several books on the subject, but they're downstairs on a shelf somewhere.

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Response to leveymg (Reply #7)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 11:01 AM

8. I think it was Culture of the Future: The Proletkult Movement in Revolutionary Russia by Lynn Malley

I could be wrong - but if it is you would probably have to get it through the library somehow.

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Response to leveymg (Reply #3)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 10:53 AM

6. is "A People's Tragedy" a good start for someone with little understanding?

 

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Response to IWelcome TheirHatred (Reply #6)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 11:03 AM

10. Haven't read it - not among the books assigned in grad courses I took in the mid-1990s

It may well be a very good general introduction. Wish I could provide an opinion on that one.

As a general historical writer, you can't do better than E.H. Carr's works from the 1940s and 1950s, but not sure you can still find it:
The Bolshevik Revolution, 1917-1923
by Edward Hallett Carr

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Response to leveymg (Reply #10)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 11:14 AM

12. Here's the excellent History of the Bolshevik Revolution by E.H. Carr that you can read online>

It's a topical treatment of the major themes of the RR, not a traditional chronology, but I recall Carr isn't too academic and a good read if you want to cover the primary modes of thought about the events. http://archive.org/details/bolshevikrevolut006132mbp

Try his "20 Years Crisis" about the rise of Fascism, as well.

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Response to IWelcome TheirHatred (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 11:02 AM

9. Black Night, White Snow

By Harrison Salisbury

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Response to MountainLaurel (Reply #9)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 11:11 AM

11. I looked this book up on Amazon....

 

the shipping cost is more than the damn book.

the book $1.16
the shipping $3.99

WTF?

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Response to IWelcome TheirHatred (Reply #11)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 11:51 AM

14. It's a big book

But the total cost is still only $5.

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Response to IWelcome TheirHatred (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 11:17 AM

13. Three Who Made a Revolution is good.

It's a biography of Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin, not a straight historical study, but very readable and interesting.

http://www.amazon.com/Three-Who-Made-Revolution-Biographical/dp/0815411774/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1357834583&sr=8-1&keywords=three+who+made+a+revolution

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Response to IWelcome TheirHatred (Original post)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 02:13 PM

15. An out-of-print classic

W H Chamberlin, The Russian Revolution 19171921. Two volumes, originally published in the 1930s. Chamberlin was the Christian Science Monitor correspondent in the Soviet Union and had access to many documents that were destroyed as Stalin re-wrote the history of the revolution. Volume one deals with the events of 1917, the second volume with the subsequent civil war and the evolving character of the Bolshevik regime and its opponents.

During the 1980s the American historian W. Bruce Lincoln produced a trilogy that is well worth reading. In War's Dark Shadow examines Russian society in the early Twentieth Century including the war with Japan and the 1905 Revolution; Passage Through Armageddon. the Russian experience in the First World War that is little-studied in the West, and Red Victory carries the story on through the 1917 events and the victory of the Soviets in the Civil War.

Another memoir of note, although it just concerns 1917 are The Russian Revolution 1917 A Personal Record by N. N. Sukhanov who as a Petrograd Menshevik witnessed many of the events first hand.

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