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Mon Jan 7, 2013, 10:31 PM

 

Psychoactive drugs and violence.

I'm still researching this. But initial finds point to a pretty dramatic increase in the incidence of violence among those (especially kids) taking psychotropic/psychiatric drugs.

Have DU denizens heard of these links and/or debunked claims? WTF?

http://presstv.com/detail/2012/12/28/280583/big-pharma-implicated-in-us-mass-shootings/

http://www.examiner.com/article/drugged-nation-sandy-hook-psychotropic-drugs-and-guns-don-t-mix

http://www.antidepressantsfacts.com/2000-05-16-School-Shootings-Psychotropic-Drugs.htm

http://www.prlog.org/12053258-isepp-calls-for-federal-investigation-into-the-link-between-psychotropic-drugs-and-mass-murder.html

http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-54968252.html

I'm trying to remain objective, and stay away from agendas. But I have heard very little about these possible links.

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Response to cbrer (Original post)

Mon Jan 7, 2013, 10:38 PM

1. Unless there were some very disturbing behaviors,

I would never put a child on any of these types of drugs.

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Response to cbrer (Original post)

Mon Jan 7, 2013, 10:41 PM

2. Former Senator John DeCamp found evidence in clinical trials that he tried to submit to Columbine

 

case, and the judge said NO. What he found is that the drugs those guys were on, they knew that one in four, or 25% would become homicidal or suicidal. That is a high risk and in the past, we would never put a drug out there like that, nor put everyone on them. Anyway, you are on the right track.

Here is a little of that info:

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/4/prweb9409967.htm

John DeCamp, Attny for Columbine Victim Mark Taylor. Press Conference at 2PM, April 20, 2012 - Clement Park, Littleton, CO. to Reveal New Details in the Case
John DeCamp represented Mark Taylor in Taylor v. Solvay Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 223 F.R.D. 544, 546 (D. Colo. 2004) and Civil Case Number:01-B-2076 (PAC) in the United States District Court for the District of Colorado, Lewis T. Babcock, Chief Judge. Filed 10-15-2003.
.
(PRWEB) April 16, 2012

John DeCamp, JD was born in Neligh, Nebraska, and joined the United States Army during the Vietnam War. He was later assigned to serve as an aide to former CIA director William Colby, who was Deputy Ambassador to Vietnam at the time. Beginning his campaign for election while still stationed in Vietnam, DeCamp was elected and served four terms as a Nebraska state senator, from 1971 to 1987.

Mr. DeCamp received his law degree from the University of Nebraska College of Law in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1967, and has helped hundreds of injured people recover millions of dollars in compensation. Decorated by President Carter for his service in Vietnam, Mr. DeCamp is listed as one of eight outstanding Vietnam veterans and organized the famous Operation Baby Lift in 1975 bringing 2,834 children of servicemen back to the USA.

John DeCamp represented Mark Taylor in Taylor v. Solvay Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 223 F.R.D. 544, 546 (D. Colo. 2004) and Civil Case Number:01-B-2076 (PAC) in the United States District Court for the District of Colorado, Lewis T. Babcock, Chief Judge. Filed 10-15-2003. The Solvay case alleged that Solvay Pharmaceuticals, the maker of Luvox, the SSRI Antidepressant drug that Eric Harris was taking at the time of the Massacre, was a contributing cause to Mark's injuries.

During the Solvay trial, certain evidence was introduced which caused the Judge to halt the trial and put all attorneys under gag order. The depositions of the Harris and Klebold's parents were immediately put under seal. The seal on the parentís depositions was renewed in 2008 for an additional twenty years as reported in 223 F.R.D. 544, 546 (D. Colo. 2004)

While Mr. DeCamp is under gag order, he is permitted to speak about some things he learned in his investigations and talk about his opinions of the case based on public records.

For more information, please contact Mr. Decamp's press agent Mr. Adams.

David Adams, david(at)adams(dot)org, 713-338-1621

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Response to cbrer (Original post)

Mon Jan 7, 2013, 10:44 PM

3. Chantix is another one! I saw awful changes in a friend over an 18 month period. Her third try.

 

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Response to cbrer (Original post)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 12:36 AM

4. No agenda here either and some say it is not the time to side step I know

But our legal systems are likely to continue to be faced with cases of violence associated with the use of psychotropic drugs, and it may fall to the courts to demand access to currently unavailable data to prove out the link /cause and effect
As usual .....
It has been a fight with many different drugs including these to have serious side effects listed or acknowledged by the makers

They rather you not know!$$! and do not count on the FDA

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Response to cbrer (Original post)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 12:58 AM

5. I would think one of the biggest problems

is mis-diagnosis. This is rampant. For instance in dealing with ADD and ADHD, determining the facts as well as understanding the source of a child's disposition is almost impossible without either long term counseling or experimentation with drugs. Drug experimentation is the easy way for a clinician to get fast, short term results as well as make a profit by pushing through as many patients as possible. What is diagnosed as ADHD can be so many other things that it's just crazy to put kids on these drugs without exhaustive research.

BTW, Ritalin as I understand it from a Psychiatrist is actually watered down amphetamine. I don't know if I trust that definition but it is logical. In a true case of ADD or ADHD, "uppers" are a calming agent; amphetamines have the opposite effect that it has on someone who does not have ADD or ADHD. Now lets say a kid is fidgety and can't concentrate in class and gets into trouble here and there from not listening. It has been common to "try" Ritalin to see if it calms them down. Big mistake. It may help them concentrate, it may help them get along, but is it actually ADHD? How does it calm them down? If they don't have ADHD they would feel great; that's for sure. And parents may feel they found and fixed the problem... but from the wrong effect. The side effects in the long run could be disastrous. If they "really" have ADHD, the child would have little knowledge that there was an effect at all; they would just calm down and be relaxed or even feel like taking a nap; that's a totally different effect.

All that said, most drugs for kids are a huge mistake without extreme circumstances and just as extremely thorough examination over a long period of counseling "without" drugs. The real source of the problem would likely be found long before drugs would be considered including psychological, parenting, high intelligence, diet... it's a long list. Drugs must exclusively be a last resort although the big bucks aren't made that way.

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Response to cbrer (Original post)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 01:29 AM

6. Michael Moore, who has a strong interest in this, thinks that pharmaceuticals should be investigated

 

This and the headline for the video are from UTube:

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Response to AnotherMcIntosh (Reply #6)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 09:18 PM

7. Oh Gary Null - he is good but getting anywhere with, or answers from, Big Pharma isnt easy

silence = $$$

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