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Sat Dec 29, 2012, 01:42 PM

Question about Chained-CPI and the media

Which TV host (or radio host) have you heard support-or-oppose Chained-CPI?

6 replies, 557 views

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Reply Question about Chained-CPI and the media (Original post)
Eric J in MN Dec 2012 OP
newfie11 Dec 2012 #1
Eric J in MN Dec 2012 #2
newfie11 Dec 2012 #3
DirkGently Dec 2012 #4
Igel Dec 2012 #5
Oilwellian Dec 2012 #6

Response to Eric J in MN (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2012, 01:52 PM

1. Thom Hartman

Oppose

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Response to newfie11 (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 29, 2012, 02:14 PM

2. Sam Seder is also opposed to Chained-CPI.


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Response to Eric J in MN (Reply #2)

Sat Dec 29, 2012, 03:41 PM

3. +1

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Response to Eric J in MN (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2012, 03:45 PM

4. Chris Hayes has explained it is simply a cut.


Hayes is an obsessively technical wonk, and he doesn't shy away from talking about even the hairiest detail. But he summed up chained CPI by saying it's a way to calculate benefits in a way that REDUCES THEM.

Because that's what it is, and that is all that ultimately matters about it. From there, people can draw their own conclusions.

Are SS benefits too high? The elderly and retired and disabled doing to well? Too much fat in that system?

Or not?

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Response to Eric J in MN (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2012, 04:41 PM

5. None.

Can't stand blithering pontificators. (I'm no different from others.Nobody likes competition.

NPR's ME simply explained it. It will have a larger effect in later years than in a shorter time frame. So it's like every other "acceptable" deficit reduction scheme--you count the deficit reduction over 10 years, with 80% of it occuring in the last few years and almost none in the next few years. That makes it short-term painless, and there's usually the belief that any problem can be fixed before the "long-term painful" kicks in. It's perceived as a smallish thing to trade for something that has a large effect short-term.

It accounts for realistic choices, based not on a fixed, static set of purchases but what people actually buy. So if cow gives you sticker shock you buy chicken. As people go back to buying beef, that's factored in. Rent vs. house, big car vs small car, car vs bus, etc., etc.

Downside is that it too broad a sampling, and doesn't adequately account for the "basket" of stuff and services that retirees purchase. They disproportionately buy medications and seek health care, which has a higher CPI than the current index or, especially, the chained CPI.

They went into more detail. They didn't take a stand. I like that in news sources. There's more than enough agitprop in the selection of news stories and sequencing and selection of the facts that make up news stories. I try to avoid seeking out preachers and polemicists as news presenters.

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Response to Eric J in MN (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2012, 05:54 PM

6. I've seen Cenk & Ed Schultz oppose it

All of cable news is for the most part encouraging us to call our representatives and ask that they compromise. I have to wonder how many Americans are actually calling their representatives and asking them to cut their Social Security and Medicare benefits. Orwellian would be proud to see American Pravda at work.

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