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Wed Dec 26, 2012, 11:28 AM

 

A Times Editorial: Data Mining Plan Violates Privacy

Last edited Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:03 PM - Edit history (1)

Online they change the title to a softer tone....subject line is how it appears in the actual rag.

A Times Editorial
Big Brother is watching more than ever
In Print: Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Over 200 years ago, the United States set the standard for promoting liberty. Our founding documents established a free people entitled to a zone of privacy. We were not walking suspects waiting to be checked out by the government. But that is not how the Obama administration sees it. A new set of rules governing counterterrorism will allow an intelligence agency to sort through and maintain massive government databases of personal information on innocent Americans. This unjustified surveillance has come about without public debate and asks Americans to give up too much privacy.
New data-mining and storage rules for the National Counterterrorism Center, a little-known intelligence agency charged with connecting dots on terror-related information, have already been secretly authorized by Attorney General Eric Holder, according to the Wall Street Journal. They were approved over the objections of privacy advocates within the administration.
Previously the NCTC had been barred from storing information on Americans unless it was related to a terror suspect or an investigation. Now that has changed. The NCTC can copy the entirety of huge databases, including flight records, casino employee lists, the names of Americans hosting foreign exchange students, and others. Information on innocent Americans can be kept for up to five years so that it can be rifled through for suspicious patterns of behavior. The data can even be shared with a foreign government in a joint effort to tease out potential future crimes.

Where once privacy constraints had kept the NCTC from acting as a massive storehouse of data and an all-seeing eye, those limits have been wiped away for the sake of expediency. One administration official called the changes "breathtaking" in scope, according to the Journal. And privacy officers at the Department of Homeland Security and Justice Department reportedly objected to the civil liberties implications and have since left their posts.

The move by the administration points up a glaring deficiency in the privacy rights of Americans. The Fourth Amendment keeps the government from snooping into people's private records without probable cause, but it doesn't shield records held by the government. To fill this gap, Congress passed the Privacy Act of 1974. It was intended to prevent information that was collected by government for one use from being used for an unrelated purpose. But agencies have been circumventing the rule by publishing notices in the Federal Register of their intention to share data, and Congress hasn't acted to close the loophole.

If the extent of data sharing were known, Americans might be less willing to provide details to government, and with good reason. The administration should suspend the new rules until they are fully vetted. The country is not made safer when every American is turned into a terrorist suspect.



Copyright 2012 Tampa Bay Times
http://www.tampabay.com/opinion/editorials/big-brother-is-watching-more-than-ever/1267546

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Response to SugarShack (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 11:31 AM

1. Rebecca Shaeffer was murdered in 1989 by a stalker who got her address from the California DMV

 

Maybe it's time for states to make it a little harder for personal information about citizens to be released wholesale to anyone.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebecca_Schaeffer

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Driver%27s_Privacy_Protection_Act

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Response to slackmaster (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 11:36 AM

2. This is about MUCH more than that. Companies "market" address for celebrities, this is government

 

stalking innocent citizens! Your post is part of a fear trap. And the government, and Holder are doing nothing about the marketing companies, selling addresses for money. Just look online how many sources there are. This has nothing to do with big brother spying on YOU!

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Response to SugarShack (Reply #2)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 11:37 AM

3. It's about Big Brother in bed with corporations, and they're spying on everyone

 

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Response to slackmaster (Reply #3)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:01 PM

4. Agree, but it's not just for "marketing" a product like personal celebrity info and money!

 

I hope astute dems get this here. Otherwise, it's a lost cause...you know that thing called democratic free state. Our government is just nosey, and yes for money for all, but there's much more to it.

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Response to slackmaster (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:25 PM

8. Corporations make lots of money off selling these addresses! Do you think they'll force the

 

corporations to stop selling your info? We just accept they do this all of the time now. This takes it a step further, from the corporations to our government.

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Response to SugarShack (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:05 PM

5. Please kick & tweet, we need a loud conversation. Our reps are distracting us with "cliff" talk

 

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Response to SugarShack (Reply #5)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:06 PM

6. There are issues at stake yes for many with cliff, but please see the more important errosion.

 

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Response to SugarShack (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:22 PM

7. So will Holder include the marketing corporations in these new laws? I think not!

 

The corporations ARE the government and THEY, the corporations will continue to data mine US, in the name of our government. They will sell all aspects of our lives, having NOTHING to do with safety. Yet the government does take our rights away for them to spy. They already do, via corporations.

I took down my Facebook page down years ago. I went to it one day, and right there in the middle of the page it said, "so and so likes Organic Valley Half and Half". I thought, that's my fucking grocery list!"


I doubt this behavior will stop. The government will allow the corporations to continue to EXPOST me, for their monetary gain. And here's Holder, working an angle of exposing us to the Feds. I've got nothing to hide, but it's all that was left of our Bill of Rights!

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Response to SugarShack (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:27 PM

9. the terrorists have won

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Response to Angry Dragon (Reply #9)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 12:42 PM

10. Exactly... Look at the TSA throwing out snowglobes!

 

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