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Fri Dec 21, 2012, 09:03 PM

 

After Recession, More Young Adults Are Living on Street

Duane Taylor was studying the humanities in community college and living in his own place when he lost his job in a round of layoffs. Then he found, and lost, a second job. And a third. Now, with what he calls “lowered standards” and a tenuous new position at a Jack in the Box restaurant, Mr. Taylor, 24, does not make enough to rent an apartment or share one. He sleeps on a mat in a homeless shelter, except when his sister lets him crash on her couch...

Across the country, tens of thousands of underemployed and jobless young people, many with college credits or work histories, are struggling to house themselves in the wake of the recession, which has left workers between the ages of 18 and 24 with the highest unemployment rate of all adults.

Those who can move back home with their parents — the so-called boomerang set — are the lucky ones. But that is not an option for those whose families have been hit hard by the economy, including Mr. Taylor, whose mother is barely scraping by while working in a laundromat. Without a stable home address, they are an elusive group that mostly couch surfs or sleeps hidden away in cars or other private places...

These young adults are the new face of a national homeless population, one that poverty experts and case workers say is growing. Yet the problem is mostly invisible. Most cities and states, focusing on homeless families, have not made special efforts to identify young adults, who tend to shy away from ordinary shelters out of fear of being victimized by an older, chronically homeless population. The unemployment rate and the number of young adults who cannot afford college “point to the fact there is a dramatic increase in homelessness” in that age group, said Barbara Poppe, the executive director of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness.

The Obama administration has begun an initiative with nine communities, most of them big cities, to seek out those between 18 and 24 who are without a consistent home address. New York, Houston, Los Angeles, Cleveland and Boston are among the cities included in the effort. “One of our first approaches is getting a more confident estimate,” said Ms. Poppe, whose agency is coordinating the initiative.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/19/us/since-recession-more-young-americans-are-homeless.html?_r=0

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 09:07 PM

1. Yep, yet we are supposed to support "going over the cliff" that will push more into homelessness.

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Response to Hoyt (Reply #1)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 09:22 PM

2. we are not supposed to support either: not harming old people or young people. it's not either-or,

 

much as the ptb want us to think so.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #2)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 09:30 PM

3. Well when John Dean says going over the cliff will cause a short recession -- it will impact youth,


who are having a tough time now.

Optimistically, Dean did think long-term we'd be better off, but short-term some folks are going to hurt. But, heck, youth are tough and healthy. And the unemployed who will lose their benefits -- they don't matter either. And with high unemployment, less is going into SS fund.

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Response to Hoyt (Reply #3)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 09:39 PM

4. that's hogwash. "going over the cliff" in & of itself will not cause an immediate recession,

 

because the cuts don't all kick in on Jan 2.

Declining federal spending WHATEVER THE CAUSE -- will, without making up that spending somewhere else.

So whether you cut old people or cut young people or cut middle-aged people -- it's going to cut spending.

Military spending is in that sense a 'good' cut as there's a big profit cut which doesn't necessarily get respent in the US. Military contractors include lots of foreign firms, for example. and domestic firms are also multinational & reinvest all over the world.

You might ask why the PTB are so intent on setting up this competition for funds between the young and the old. It is entirely rigged, you know. The 'fiscal cliff' exists because congress voted to create it. They can vote to uncreate it, & that should be the next focus of public protest & this administration's negotiation.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #4)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 09:52 PM

5. I agree on military spending, etc. But rethugs are a reality, so you deal

with them best you can for good of everyone who needs some help.

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Response to Hoyt (Reply #5)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 10:14 PM

7. 'best you can for the good of everyone' admits a wealth of possibilities.

 

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 09:56 PM

6. I often look at the housing needed section on "Craigs List."

I want so badly to open my home and an extra room to some of
the people on there that are desperate. I've often done that for
people my kids know, but can't risk it with someone I don't know.

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