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Mon Dec 17, 2012, 03:59 PM

 

Ok a question for you gun nuts - is it even possible to imprint the magazines to only accept the

registered guns that they are supposed to be on?

Otherwise it should be rejected or misfired.

Even an DNA imprint would help.

Think LawGiver

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Arrow 14 replies Author Time Post
Reply Ok a question for you gun nuts - is it even possible to imprint the magazines to only accept the (Original post)
Panasonic Dec 2012 OP
Recursion Dec 2012 #1
letemrot Dec 2012 #2
TheCowsCameHome Dec 2012 #3
Recursion Dec 2012 #5
hack89 Dec 2012 #4
ChoppinBroccoli Dec 2012 #6
nadinbrzezinski Dec 2012 #7
ProgressiveProfessor Dec 2012 #8
-..__... Dec 2012 #12
-..__... Dec 2012 #10
ohheckyeah Dec 2012 #9
Honeycombe8 Dec 2012 #11
Panasonic Dec 2012 #14
FarCenter Dec 2012 #13

Response to Panasonic (Original post)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 04:01 PM

1. One thing people have been working on is a "dead man's switch" so only a specific person can fire it

This could be biometrics or even just an RFID chip on a bracelet (not foolproof, but something).

In terms of the magazine, they're pretty much just a box with a spring in it, so you'd need to fit some kind of unique lock on the magazine well and have a key of some sort in the magazine.

Not the same but it reminds me of the situation in California, where the magazine well has some kind of screw so that you need to use a tool to change the magazine, which would slow anyone down.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #1)


Response to Recursion (Reply #1)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 04:06 PM

3. That's a term that says it all,

although maybe it wasn't intended to be that way.

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Response to TheCowsCameHome (Reply #3)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 04:07 PM

5. It comes from trains, I think

If the engineer has a heart attack or something, the train gradually comes to a stop.

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Response to Panasonic (Original post)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 04:06 PM

4. No - it would serve no purpose

and could be dangerous if it malfunctioned.

Most smart gun technology is centered on having the gun fire only when handled by a specific person. The technology has a long way to go before it is usable.

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Response to Panasonic (Original post)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 04:09 PM

6. Like In "The Fifth Element"

A fingerprint scanner on the trigger that only allows the registered owner of the gun to fire it. Maybe that's a little too "science fiction" for right now, but I think the technology is getting close to being there. And if we give the gun manufacturers a financial "incentive" to do it, I think it could get done.

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Response to Panasonic (Original post)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 04:10 PM

7. No, there are technical solutions

Some of them will mean a few changes mechanically to weapons.

What is coming down the pipe and is being field tested, is smart gun technology. It is not there yet, but essentially means only the person that the gun is mated to can fire. It will increase police officer safety, would have prevented this shooting, and the greatest plus to me...will bring down to almost zero children and accidental shootings.

This assumes it can be back fitted to guns out there (it should, the testing platform is the Glock frame). Once this matures, any responsible gun owner will rush to get this onto their guns.

Essentially you come to rob me, I whip my gun out (so far common scenario) so you decide dead men tell no tales (so far common scenario) the gun "knows" you are not the shooter, it does not go off. . This is not the common ending. Congrats Mr. Robber, you got a hammer.

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Response to nadinbrzezinski (Reply #7)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 09:55 PM

8. It is a bit further out than many think and the liability is tremendous.

First failure to fire for a cop, solider or civilian and the lawsuits will fly.

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Response to ProgressiveProfessor (Reply #8)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 10:34 PM

12. Here's the rub.

 

"Smart Gun" technology as originally proposed/initiated, was with LEO firearms in mind (it was realized that a significant number of LEO's were killed/wounded with their own duty weapons after being relived of said weapons while wrestling with suspects), yet... whenever this marvel of "technology" is brought up as a solution to reducing firearms related deaths, LEO organizations scream the loudest, and are the most vocal against it.

As a consequence, the usual outcome is an exemption for police officers and their issued firearms.

As an example... the failed N.J. "Smart Gun" legislation...

New Jersey on Monday became the first state to enact "smart gun" legislation that would eventually require new handguns to contain a mechanism that allows only their owners to fire them.

The law will not go into effect immediately because the technology is still under development and it could be years before it becomes a reality. But supporters hailed it as an important milestone in the campaign to reduce handgun deaths.

"This is common-sense legislation. There are safety regulations on cars, on toys. It's clearly time we have safety regulations on handguns," Gov. James E. McGreevey said at Monday's bill signing ceremony.

The New Jersey Institute of Technology is developing a smart gun prototype that would use sensors on the pistol grip to identify a user.

The owner would have his grip programmed at a gun shop or police range by practice-firing the weapon. A microchip in the weapon would remember the grip and determine in an instant whether the authorized user was holding the weapon. If not, the gun would not fire.

Under the New Jersey law, the technology will be required in all new handguns sold three years after the state attorney general determines a smart gun prototype is safe and commercially available. Weapons used by law enforcement officers would be exempt.

Supporters say the law will help prevent accidental gun deaths and suicides.


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,73763,00.html


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Response to nadinbrzezinski (Reply #7)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 10:13 PM

10. Correct me if I'm wrong...

 

but, didn't the Germans seek to incorporate this design into the Sturmweber (STGWEB 44), so that if it fell into Allied hands, it could not be turned against them?

We could learn a lot from the Germans.

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Response to Panasonic (Original post)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 10:06 PM

9. Question for

nasty name callers - is it possible to have a discussion without all of the name calling?

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Response to Panasonic (Original post)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 10:18 PM

11. Why would you need that, if you can't buy magazines with 30 rounds? BTW...calling

people "gun nuts" because they have an interest in guns is insulting. Even if you don't care about others, that's not a good way to win others over to a cause.

I don't see any posts calling those who don't have an interest in guns, names (like gun wussy or whatever). That would be insulting and disrespectful.

I have a gun for protection but would not be considered a gun lover. I didn't know what a magazine was until yesterday. But there is an attitude by some who don't understand that others are raised around guns, relatives collected guns, maybe they have a hobby to shoot at the target range or skeet shooting, raised to be respectful of guns. Whereas others who live in urban environments may see them only as instruments of death and harm. Just respect others' experiences and hobbies.

Some people hunt. I think that's an abhorrent hobby. Killing animals for funsies? But I resist calling them names. Won't change anything and only make them angry, resentful, and want to defend hunting all the more.

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #11)

Tue Dec 18, 2012, 08:26 AM

14. Dude, I'm so anti-gun, you would not believe it.

 

I studied martial arts, but understood it is only for defensive purposes.

I know how to disarm gun wielders and knife wielders easily, and I look like a obese middle-aged man.

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Response to Panasonic (Original post)

Mon Dec 17, 2012, 10:42 PM

13. Yes, you could do it with RFID chips

Epoxy to the magazine an RFID chips with a secret key embedded in the chip.

Put a RFID tag reader in the gun that has the same embedded secret key. Arrange the gun to only fire if the magazine proves via a cryptographic authentication protocol that it has the correct secret key.

This would limit which magazines would work with a specific gun, but I'm not sure how valuable that would be. It could certainly prevent the user from having a backpack full of loaded magazines.

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