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Fri Dec 14, 2012, 11:02 PM

Expert: Conn. shooting to impact school security nationwide

The shooting massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. on Friday that left 27 people dead, including 18 children, will shape the very foundation of school security across the country moving forward, according to one prominent school security expert.

Paul Timm, who serves as president of Illinois-based school security consulting firm RETA Security, says he has "no doubt" that this massacre will garner attention from federal lawmakers and that schools nationwide will be forced to look at their security measures in a completely new way.

Among the most important things that Timm believes schools will look at in the aftermath of this shooting is access control, which he says has been glossed over for too long. "The name of the game is always going to be access control. Our access control procedures must be better," he said.

http://www.securityinfowatch.com/article/10842912/expert-conn-shooting-to-impact-school-security-nationwide

The foundation of all security is physical security and controlling the space around you.

Wasn't this the site where recently people were whining about the introduction of RFID badges in San Antonio schools?

Every building I ever worked in had far better access controls than do schools.

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Arrow 12 replies Author Time Post
Reply Expert: Conn. shooting to impact school security nationwide (Original post)
FarCenter Dec 2012 OP
BeyondGeography Dec 2012 #1
Skittles Dec 2012 #2
thebard77 Dec 2012 #6
uppityperson Dec 2012 #9
thebard77 Dec 2012 #10
MichiganVote Dec 2012 #3
WinkyDink Dec 2012 #4
thebard77 Dec 2012 #5
rustydog Dec 2012 #7
WinkyDink Dec 2012 #8
ChazII Dec 2012 #11
Nye Bevan Dec 2012 #12

Response to FarCenter (Original post)

Fri Dec 14, 2012, 11:04 PM

1. It's a money maker, no doubt

Fortunes will be made off of this; it's the American way.

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Response to FarCenter (Original post)

Fri Dec 14, 2012, 11:05 PM

2. I'm guessing it will make home schooling WAY more popular

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Response to Skittles (Reply #2)

Fri Dec 14, 2012, 11:16 PM

6. probably

 

Unfortunately, most home school kids I have come across are socially awkward and behind in general knowledge. They can pass standardized tests because that is what they are educated to do. I mean no offense to anyone who home schools their kid but there is a reason why teachers are licensed (even if many of them have no business being in front of a classrooom).

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Response to thebard77 (Reply #6)

Sat Dec 15, 2012, 12:15 AM

9. It is opposite for me. Most of the home schooled kids are very knowledgeable and socially interactin

interacting. Public schools unfortunately put a lot on passing standardized testing, spending a lot of time on just those tests rather than learning how to learn and learning. The system, public school system, has problems that way where home schooling doesn't.

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Response to uppityperson (Reply #9)

Sat Dec 15, 2012, 12:37 AM

10. It depends on the public school, the state and the district

 

I was an adjunct music professor at a school in the North East and I can tell you that home schooled kids are usually (there is always an exception) more immature than their peers. Unless the parents have encouraged extra curricular activities to allow for peer interaction, home schooled children are not subjected environmental aspects of schooling which bolsters social development. This is a huge part of education and much of it comes from the peer interaction between teenagers. Also, home schooled kids sometimes go off the deep end when they get that freedom in college. I've seen that happen far too often.

As for the education. I've seen some public schools which produce amazing students. This usually means they have a wealthy community and therefore, higher tax revenue. I personally send my kids to private school because at the end of the day I know the administration has more authority to expel and isn't bound by the same rules requiring public schools to provide an education to everyone. The teachers also have more wiggle room in regards to curriculum. They still abide by state regulations but they aren't forced to utilize the same tired curriculum which has existed for 30 years.

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Response to FarCenter (Original post)

Fri Dec 14, 2012, 11:05 PM

3. Meanwhile in Michigan, the Repub idiots pass a law to permit guns in schools.

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Response to FarCenter (Original post)

Fri Dec 14, 2012, 11:07 PM

4. My school district has had locked doors and ID's from pre-9/11.

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Response to FarCenter (Original post)

Fri Dec 14, 2012, 11:14 PM

5. The big problem is fire code

 

Using conventional locking mechanisms to solve this problem will result in numerous fire code violations where the fire department would not be able to access a building in an emergency. However, there is technology available which gives them access to a building using electronic locking mechanisms which have electronic and mechanical overides. I work in hospitals and have seen them in labor and delivery wards. Some even have panic buttons which will lock down the entire floor. Security gave the code to the police and fire department in an emergency once. Of course this comes down to cost and no one will want to pay the expense. I do have a solution though. I'm pretty sure we could pay for most schools by just cutting aid to one of the myriad of corrupt regimes we fund with tax payer dollars.

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Response to FarCenter (Original post)

Fri Dec 14, 2012, 11:32 PM

7. classrooms have windows...schools have playgrounds

the public drive up and drop off kids....

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Response to rustydog (Reply #7)

Fri Dec 14, 2012, 11:34 PM

8. What part of "the killer was inside the school" did you miss?

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Response to rustydog (Reply #7)

Sun Dec 16, 2012, 12:46 PM

11. Out here in Phoenix (the valley)

schools haven't had windows since the 80's. Of course that is for cost of heating and cooling. You're right about the drop off area and recess. Schools are an easy target - no pun intended.

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Response to FarCenter (Original post)

Sun Dec 16, 2012, 04:15 PM

12. He broke a window to get in.

No "entrance vestibules" or "software access control systems" would have prevented that.

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