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Wed Dec 12, 2012, 08:12 PM

 

Internet use can reduce cancer fatalism

http://www.upi.com/Science_News/Technology/2012/12/11/Internet-use-can-reduce-cancer-fatalism/UPI-89741355286562/
Previous studies have shown that local TV viewing could increase cancer fatalism overtime.

The findings, published in the Journal of Communication, suggested people who use the Internet frequently to acquire health or medical information were less likely than those who did not use the Internet for such purposes to hold cancer fatalism over time.

More importantly, the research showed that Internet use reduced cancer fatalism among less educated and less health-knowledgeable people to a greater extent than among more educated and more knowledgeable people, Lee said.

"Reducing cancer fatalism, especially among people with low socioeconomic status, is arguably one of the most important public health goals in the nation," Lee said in a statement. "Studying the effect of Internet use on cancer fatalism is important, considering that the Internet has become a new, very crucial source of health information for the American public these days."

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Science_News/Technology/2012/12/11/Internet-use-can-reduce-cancer-fatalism/UPI-89741355286562/#ixzz2EtFQMf8m

4 replies, 643 views

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Arrow 4 replies Author Time Post
Reply Internet use can reduce cancer fatalism (Original post)
2on2u Dec 2012 OP
immoderate Dec 2012 #1
2on2u Dec 2012 #2
NightWatcher Dec 2012 #3
Lars39 Dec 2012 #4

Response to 2on2u (Original post)

Wed Dec 12, 2012, 08:26 PM

1. "Cancer fatalism" is a new one on me.

Where have I been?

--imm

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Response to immoderate (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 12, 2012, 08:29 PM

2. Me too.... found this....

 

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/707850

Fatalistic health beliefs can contribute to racial/ethnic health disparities. Cancer fatalism, the health belief that death is inevitable when cancer is present, has been linked to low cancer screening rates, delays in cancer treatment after diagnosis, and reluctance to engage in healthy lifestyle behaviors to reduce cancer risk. In each case, patients with fatalistic health beliefs feel that there is nothing they can do to prevent cancer or avoid death from cancer. The belief is that death is simply their fate. Low cancer screening and delays in treatment reduce cancer survival and can inadvertently reinforce the belief that cancer is always fatal.

Research demonstrates that cancer fatalism is prevalent across cultural groups, including Asians, African Americans and Hispanics. Indeed, fatalism beliefs are often cited as the reason family members of cancer patients will request to withhold a cancer diagnosis from a loved one; believing that knowledge of the cancer diagnosis will diminish the patient's will to live and expedite death. Another cancer health belief common among African American pulmonary patients and lung cancer clinic patients facing lung surgery, is that the cancer will spread rapidly at surgery. Such health beliefs may result in patients refusing disease-modifying surgery, contributing to the higher lung cancer death rates found among African Americans.

These results highlight the importance of providing culturally sensitive medical care. Providers need a heightened awareness of cultural values and beliefs that impact patient care. Health beliefs should be explored during the medical encounter to address potential barriers to cancer screening and reduce racial/ethnic disparities in cancer survival rates.

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Response to 2on2u (Original post)

Wed Dec 12, 2012, 08:31 PM

3. the net's great for finding info and support

Have you seen the DU health support groups?

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Response to 2on2u (Original post)

Wed Dec 12, 2012, 08:35 PM

4. I bet they also use the internet to find things that make them happy.

Things like lolcats, music they hadn't heard in years on YouTube, jokes and stimulating conversation like that found on DU.

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