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Mon Dec 10, 2012, 06:44 PM

Plan For Aiding Arid West Includes Idea For Major Water Pipeline From Nation's Midsection

ST. LOUIS Even as drought-stricken Midwestern states squabble over diminishing water supplies in the region, a new federal-state study raises the idea of constructing a 670-mile pipeline to divert water from one of the Mississippi's major tributaries to help seven arid states in the West.

For two years, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming have been considering ways to provide more water for the growing populations in the West. A plan scheduled for release later this month will include a proposal for a pipeline to ship water west from the Missouri River, along with a number of less ambitious options.

The pipeline proposal, which would cost an estimated $11.2 billion and take 30 years to complete, is expected to intensify the debate over how to ease one growing region's shortages without harming the interests of others.

Bureau of Reclamation spokesman Dan DuBray said the pipeline idea is in the very early stages, a long way from reality.

"The idea of constructing conveyances to move water resources between other basins and the Colorado has been raised before and was once again submitted as an idea in this process," DuBray said. He said the proposal will be evaluated, but that the agency doesn't view it as "among the most practical or cost-effective proposals submitted."

MORE...

http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/story/b67056c67f0446c48470762b3aaed3ca/US--Missouri-River-Pipeline

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Reply Plan For Aiding Arid West Includes Idea For Major Water Pipeline From Nation's Midsection (Original post)
Purveyor Dec 2012 OP
Warpy Dec 2012 #1
marmar Dec 2012 #2
Warpy Dec 2012 #6
AnOhioan Dec 2012 #8
Purveyor Dec 2012 #3
discharge Dec 2012 #4
rurallib Dec 2012 #5
Junkdrawer Dec 2012 #9
Speck Tater Dec 2012 #7
Odin2005 Dec 2012 #10
Odin2005 Dec 2012 #11
yortsed snacilbuper Dec 2012 #12

Response to Purveyor (Original post)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 06:46 PM

1. That's what the Keystone Pipeline should be

carrying water from the Great Lakes states to where it's desperately needed, the dry lands farming areas where the aquifer is depleted. Those areas feed us.

Oil sand slurry to be shipped overseas is no reason to threaten sensitive public lands.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #1)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 06:49 PM

2. I don't know if Canada would be too thrilled with such a plan......


....... let alone some of the Great Lakes States.


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Response to marmar (Reply #2)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 07:06 PM

6. I know. However, the west is in severe drought

that's echoing the Dust Bowl years, although farming methods have changed enough to prevent the choking dust storms from it. It would be nice to have a pipeline and contingency plan in place since these epic droughts are periodic, at the very least.

Here in NM, we have our own water diversion project ensuring a water supply to farmers down south and in Texas from across the continental divide. The San Juan River has been partially diverted to the Rio Grande Valley. Most of the local water is ground water from deep wells.

Some times you have to make tough choices. This is one of those times.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #6)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 08:46 PM

8. Yep...tough choices..move from where you need piped in water.

The Great Lakes states will not allow the diversion of water out of the region. Ain't gonna happen.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #1)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 06:51 PM

3. Lake Michigan Water Levels Near Record Lows

WEST MICHIGAN After a very mild, reasonably dry winter last year, followed by drought this summer, and more recently a nearly dry November, all continue to take their toll on the Great Lakes. Lake Michigan in particular (our closest friend and neighbor) is within two inches of a record low-level for the month of December. The current Lake Michigan level is at/around 576.2 feet above sea level. Water levels have been dropping since the 1990′s across the Great Lakes. The Army Corps of Engineers say Lake Michigan water levels may fall to record lows over the winter unless heavy rains and/or large snowfalls blanket the region.

Experts blame much of the falling water levels on lean winter snowfalls, but the problem is a little deeper. Reduced rainfall over the years has also exacerbated the issue. Remember, Lake Michigan is a large catch basin for creeks, streams, rivers, and tributaries dumping into it from several states. On average, there has been less precipitation falling and subsequently less water filling the lakes. One of the other issues are the warmer water temperatures of the lakes themselves. With higher surface temperatures, more lake water is evaporated. That evaporation is obviously increased if the air, soil, and vegetation are dry from a lack of precipitation and drought.

Take a look at these numbers across the Great Lakes. Lake Michigan and Lake Huron are considered one body of water for the purpose of levels and water height. That said, both are 16″ lower than last year at this time. Lake Superior is 2″ lower, Lake St. Clair (a smaller lake by Detroit) is 26″ lower, Lake Erie 21″ lower, and Lake Ontario 13″ lower. Over the next month both Superior and Michigan-Huron are expected to drop another 3″ from current levels. That would place Michigan-Huron at record low levels for the month of December. The previous record was set back in 1948 at 576.18 feet above sea level. The Army Corps of Engineers and hydrologists are already expecting new record low levels to be set for Michigan-Huron in January, February, and March. The record lows for those months are 576.12 feet January 1965, 576.08 feet in February 1964, and 576.05 feet in March 1964. Records have generally been kept from 1918 to the present. As a comparison, the highest monthly average occurred in October 1986 at 582.35 feet above sea level for Lake Michigan.

Needless to say this kind of change in water levels (especially if it continues) has the potential to negatively affect cargo shipping, boating, recreation, and even property values. The city of South Haven is actually considering dredging the marina and some areas on the Black River at a reported cost of about $150,000. Several boats have reportedly touched bottom in recent months. They hope to have the project completed before the spring rush of boats go back into the water.

Read more: http://fox17online.com/2012/12/04/lake-michigan-water-levels-near-record-lows/#ixzz2EhEJaU3h

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Response to Purveyor (Original post)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 06:53 PM

4. Canada

 

Has already said that they'll start damming rivers if we try to steal Great Lakes water. Can't blame them either.

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Response to Purveyor (Original post)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 06:53 PM

5. believe the Great Lakes Compact was put together for

ETA - to stop the theft of Great Lakes water.
Anybody half awake could look at a map of North America and easily figure where the arid southwest would look for water. It's as plain as the blue in the middle of the map.

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Response to rurallib (Reply #5)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 09:08 PM

9. The lakes formerly known as Great will follow the Aral Sea...



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aral_Sea

America's Motto: Use it till it's gone.

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Response to Purveyor (Original post)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 07:08 PM

7. 30 years to complete! By then climate change will have dried up the Mississippi

 

There won't be any water left to ship west.

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Response to Purveyor (Original post)


Response to Purveyor (Original post)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 10:28 PM

11. Maybe it's time to reverse all the environmentally unsustainible development in the West.

In a sustainable society a city like Las Vegas would not exist, at least not at it's present size

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Response to Purveyor (Original post)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 10:33 PM

12. I thought they didn't need anything from anybody,

this sounds like socialism!

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