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Sat Dec 8, 2012, 10:49 AM

Another collared, and very famous Yellowstone wolf killed in Wyoming’s hunt

http://www.thewildlifenews.com/2012/12/07/yet-another-collared-and-very-famous-yellowstone-wolf-killed-in-wyomings-hunt/



Briefly noted wildlife news stories. Dec. 5, 2012..

Yet another collared, and very famous Yellowstone wolf killed in Wyoming’s hunt.

By Ken Cole On December 7, 2012 ·

Wolf “06″, the alpha female of the Yellowstone’s Lamar Canyon Pack has been shot in Wyoming by a hunter.

Wolf “06″ was probably the most famous wolf in Yellowstone and had been viewed by thousands of Park visitors. She was also part of the ongoing study of wolves that has been conducted in Yellowstone since the time they were reintroduced in 1995. So far there have been 8 collared Yellowstone wolves killed this year and an unknown number of uncollared Yellowstone wolves have likely been killed as well.

The ongoing study of wolves and their interactions with other species is responsible for the huge amount of information gained since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone and Central Idaho. The number of collared wolves lost to the hunt in the surrounding parts of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming could only be described as crippling to understanding the role that wolves play in the ecosystem. The wolves in Yellowstone also draw millions of tourist dollars to the area each year.

Several conservation groups have petitioned to ask that a buffer zone be created around Yellowstone National Park so that wolves that primarily use Yellowstone National Park have some level of protection when they move out of its boundaries.



A Conservation Icon in the Crosshairs
http://www.defendersblog.org/2012/12/conservation-icon-in-the-crosshairs/

It's just unfair. Hunters and outfitters are picking off the wolves of Yellowstone National Park. Call upon officials to create a buffer zone to protect them: http://wg.convio.net/site/MessageViewer?em_id=10181.0

Reform the Federal Wildlife-Killing Program

Urge Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to reform Wildlife Services from the federal government's top wildlife killers to a program that can truly resolve wildlife conflicts.

http://secure.defenders.org/site/Advocacy?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=2443&fb_action_ids=4602717198872&fb_action_types=og.recommends&fb_source=aggregation&fb_aggregation_id=288381481237582
~~

http://www.wolfcenter.org/pdf/Benerfits-Wolves.pdf

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Reply Another collared, and very famous Yellowstone wolf killed in Wyoming’s hunt (Original post)
G_j Dec 2012 OP
TwilightGardener Dec 2012 #1
dipsydoodle Dec 2012 #2
G_j Dec 2012 #3
flvegan Dec 2012 #4
sulphurdunn Dec 2012 #5
sunwyn Dec 2012 #6
Cleita Dec 2012 #7
G_j Dec 2012 #16
oxymoron Dec 2012 #8
cliffordu Dec 2012 #9
smirkymonkey Dec 2012 #12
cliffordu Dec 2012 #15
G_j Dec 2012 #21
Auntie Bush Dec 2012 #10
Beartracks Dec 2012 #11
yardwork Dec 2012 #13
CrispyQ Dec 2012 #14
joeybee12 Dec 2012 #17
G_j Dec 2012 #19
Octafish Dec 2012 #18
Oilwellian Dec 2012 #20

Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 11:01 AM

1. Very wrong. And sad.

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 11:04 AM

2. Fucking animals

The hunters : not the wolves.

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 11:27 AM

3. they need us... now

Last edited Mon Dec 10, 2012, 01:04 PM - Edit history (1)

https://secure.defenders.org/site/SPageServer?pagename=wagc_graywolf&s_src=3WEE1303XGWXX&s_subsrc=121012_ADOPTFF_WolfPromo_email&JServSessionIdr004=h80am2x1u4.app225a

Ensure a Lasting Future for America’s Wolves!
Threats to the Future of Wolves

Anti-wolf extremism threatens the future of wolves in Greater Yellowstone and the Northern Rockies – and in places like Oregon, Washington and other western states where wolves are just beginning to reclaim their former homes.

Meanwhile in the Southwest, Mexican wolves are struggling to survive. Only around 50 of these animals are left in the wild, they’re the most endangered wolves in the world. But extremists in Congress want to strip Endangered Species Act protections for these rare animals – and expose these wolves to a second extinction in the wild.

Once virtually eliminated from the lower 48 United States, wolves are clawing their way back from extinction since Defenders and others successfully fought for their re-introduction into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho in 1995.

In 2011, Congress gave final approval for a budget deal that included a non-budget provision to strip federal protections for wolves in the Northern Rockies. This unprecedented congressional action removed protections under a 2009 delisting rule that was declared unlawful by a federal district court -- while preventing challenges to the delisting in court.

Despite recovering from near extinction, wolves still face many challenges. Defenders will continue to work hard in all our efforts mentioned above to ensure the wolves have a lasting future in the region and in states like Oregon and Washington, where wolves are just beginning to reclaim their native habitat. Defenders is committed to the long-term survival of America's wolves and other imperiled wildlife. We will continue to work in the field, in the courts and in Washington to ensure healthy, interconnected populations and ecosystems.

Meanwhile, in the Southwest, around 50 wolves struggle to maintain a foothold in the wild as anti-wolf forces rally to eliminate their very existence. We're on the ground in Arizona and New Mexico, countering anti-wolf misinformation to ensure that these endangered wolves have a future in the Southwest.

But our work doesn't stop there. To help ease the financial burden of livestock losses attributed to wolves, we're working closely with ranchers and state and local officials to implement efforts to reduce livestock/wolf conflicts, so that the endless cycle of killing wolves for livestock depredations is stopped.


How Your Adoption Helps Save Wolves

Helps Defenders fight anti-wolf extremism on the ground and ensure a lasting future for wolves in their natural homes. Helps underwrite our wolf-saving work with ranchers to keep livestock and wolf packs apart. Give a Wolf-Saving Gift to participate in one of these programs. Allows us to post rewards and help bring to justice people who illegally kill wolves. Wolf Fun Fact
Wolves have a complex communication system ranging from barks and whines to growls and howls. Howling alone can mean many things: a greeting, a rallying cry to gather the pack together or to get ready for a hunt, a warning to other wolves, or a spontaneous expression of play and bonding.

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Named "America's Best Wildlife Charity" by Reader's Digest, Defenders of Wildlife has been a leading innovator in developing the most effective ways to conserve imperiled wildlife and wild lands for over 60 years. Your adoption donation will immediately be put to use where it is most needed to achieve these goals.

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 12:19 PM

4. In this case, "hunter" is such a laughable term. n/t

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 01:37 PM

5. It is ironic

that just above this article is an advertisement for big game hunting in Alberta, where there is no bag limit on wolves.

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 01:39 PM

6. Are the hunters able to tap into the signals these collars give off?

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 01:39 PM

7. That's disgusting. I hate those people. I have been in wolf country in Canada.

It's magical to listen to them at night. The Interior Department should ban ranching in wolf country IMHO. That's the only reason the wolves are killed because they go after the livestock. They are part of the eco-system and deserve to be left alone in their territory.

I'm always amazed at name places that are named after animals like bears or antelope where the animals they are named after are no more because of humans and development. If we want to lower global temperatures, part of it is bringing back our wilderness areas, especially the forested ones, that will counteract the carbon emissions.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #7)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 12:43 PM

16. absolutely!

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 01:45 PM

8. I think trophy hunters should be collared and tagged so we can keep track of them.

They are the lowest form of vermin on the planet.

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 01:52 PM

9. I'd like to express my appreciation to the gutless shitsucking cretins

that hunt wolves from 300 yards out.

Any weak, stupid, scared, useless, motherfucking coward can do that.

If you REALLY need to kill a wolf, take a spear with you and do the job right.

Level playing field. Up close and personal.

Then you can wear that wolves' skin like a trophy.

Or she can wear yours.

That's hunting, you weak sniveling murdering bullies.

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Response to cliffordu (Reply #9)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 04:42 PM

12. Bravo!

Poor wolf. They are such beautiful animals. God, I hate hunters. What is the goddamn point anyway?

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Response to smirkymonkey (Reply #12)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 09:33 PM

15. I have no problem at ALL with hunting for food.

I love the occasional trout when I can go -

Trophy hunters should be made to hunt each other......

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Response to cliffordu (Reply #9)

Tue Dec 11, 2012, 11:20 AM

21. I found this essay compelling..

Senseless seasons on animals doesn’t justify hunting

http://stillwatergazette.com/2012/11/02/senseless-seasons-on-animals-doesnt-justify-hunting/

<snip>

I now live in semi-wilderness not far from the St. Croix River. I grew up in the 1940s and 1950s on the North Hill in Stillwater in a familial culture where hunting and trapping was an annual tradition. One learned the trade early on, imbued with the belief that one had to learn to hunt and kill as a sacred right of masculine passage. Returning home with the slain was proof of your skill, and a trophy kill a badge of personal honor and achievement.

I stopped hunting and trapping long ago. For years, I was ambivalent about speaking out because I accepted the cultural and psychological influences motivating those who grew up considering unnecessary killing a sport. I’ve come to recognize how superficial, shallow, fleeting and self-destructive is this violent indulgence.

I’ve come 180 degrees. For me, it is the senseless open seasons on wolves, bears, and in Wisconsin, even mourning doves.

The hunting of deer, upland birds and waterfowl once seemed justified to put food on the family table. Today, the cost of a box of ammunition exceeds the price of meat at the grocery store. In my area, one could easily survive indefinitely on fresh road kill.

Statistically, wolves and bears present no significant threat to people, domestic animals or human habitat if reasonable precautions are taken to discourage their incursions into our domain. The idea of hunting mourning doves is obscenely ludicrous.

What I’ve witnessed in the 12 years at the small Northwoods lake where I live is a dramatic decline of lower -end food chain wildlife, birds and the creatures that sustain the natural infrastructure — dam building, weed control and water quality, erosion mitigation, fish reproduction, small mammal and amphibian shoreline character. This comes from trapping, over hunting and mindless pollution. We now see accounts of dogs killed by increasingly sophisticated traps planted in the woods. This is insane.
<snip>

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 04:36 PM

10. This made me sick to my stomach. I have a very soft spot in my heart for wolves and

donate to wildlife organizations that try and protect these magnificent animals.

Love that picture of those "kissing" wolves!

When the Alpha females are killed...many pups also die and they are never considered in the count. Sad! So I wonder how many wolves are really killed.

Someday I want to paint a wolf for my Grandson. But they look pretty hard to do, so I've put it off till I get more experience.

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 04:42 PM

11. I agree: Protect the animals OF Yellowstone, not just the ones IN Yellowstone. n/t

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 04:42 PM

13. What is wrong with people.

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 04:46 PM

14. I couldn't read it but I'm giving a kick & rec.

Gorgeous photo of gorgeous animals.

Us? Not so much.

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 12:53 PM

17. This is nauseating, and Saalzar is to blame...he signed off on letting the states

decide how to run the hunt, and also gave them permission to kill up to 2/3 of the wolves...phucker.

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Response to joeybee12 (Reply #17)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 12:58 PM

19. Salazar is certainly one of Obama's very worst appointments

terrible!

he needs to go!

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 12:57 PM

18. Wolf 06

As you indicate, G_j, as there were alternatives, this is very sad news. My nephew was involved with the Wolf Conservation Center in New York and had told my wife about the program at Yellowstone. T

Who says government doesn't create jobs?

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Mon Dec 10, 2012, 02:48 PM

20. Very, very sad news

Remember Sarah Palin supporting the aerial hunting of wolves in Alaska? She and her friends loved wearing their pelts.

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