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Thu Dec 6, 2012, 11:54 AM

What's The Big Deal About Fracking? This. This Is The Big Deal

Schilke’s neighbors love her black Angus beef, but she’s no longer sharing or eating it—not since fracking began on thirty-two oil and gas wells within three miles of her 160-acre ranch and five of her cows dropped dead.”

- Fracking Our Food Supply, The Nation




Found on The Nation’s Facebook page/MoveOn.org

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Reply What's The Big Deal About Fracking? This. This Is The Big Deal (Original post)
Playinghardball Dec 2012 OP
jillan Dec 2012 #1
Bozita Dec 2012 #2
marions ghost Dec 2012 #3
RomneyLies Dec 2012 #4

Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 11:55 AM

1. The public needs to be educated on this and fast!

Everytime I see that tall blonde woman talking about all the jobs that fracking would create (exxon?) - I just want to throw something at my tv.

She is on all of the time and everytime I wonder how many people don't realize that she is an actress getting paid to say that.

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 12:08 PM

2. Fracking Our Food Supply

Fracking Our Food Supply
By Elizabeth Royte, Nation of Change
01 December 12


In a Brooklyn winery on a sultry July evening, an elegant crowd sips rosé and nibbles trout plucked from the gin-clear streams of upstate New York. The diners are here, with their checkbooks, to support a group called Chefs for the Marcellus, which works to protect the food shed upon which hundreds of regional farm-to-fork restaurants depend. The food shed is coincident with the Marcellus Shale, a geologic formation that arcs northeast from West Virginia through Pennsylvania and into New York State. As everyone invited here knows, the region is both agriculturally and energy rich, with vast quantities of natural gas sequestered deep below its fertile fields and forests.

In Pennsylvania, the oil and gas industry is already on a tear - drilling thousands of feet into ancient seabeds, then repeatedly fracturing (or "fracking") these wells with millions of gallons of highly pressurized, chemically laced water, which shatters the surrounding shale and releases fossil fuels. New York, meanwhile, is on its own natural-resource tear, with hundreds of newly opened breweries, wineries, organic dairies and pastured livestock operations - all of them capitalizing on the metropolitan area's hunger to localize its diet.

But there's growing evidence that these two impulses, toward energy and food independence, may be at odds with each other.

Tonight's guests have heard about residential drinking wells tainted by fracking fluids in Pennsylvania, Wyoming and Colorado. They've read about lingering rashes, nosebleeds and respiratory trauma in oil-patch communities, which are mostly rural, undeveloped, and lacking in political influence and economic prospects. The trout nibblers in the winery sympathize with the suffering of those communities. But their main concern tonight is a more insidious matter: the potential for drilling and fracking operations to contaminate our food. The early evidence from heavily fracked regions, especially from ranchers, is not reassuring.

Jacki Schilke and her sixty cattle live in the top left corner of North Dakota, a windswept, golden-hued landscape in the heart of the Bakken Shale. Schilke's neighbors love her black Angus beef, but she's no longer sharing or eating it - not since fracking began on thirty-two oil and gas wells within three miles of her 160-acre ranch and five of her cows dropped dead. Schilke herself is in poor health. A handsome 53-year-old with a faded blond ponytail and direct blue eyes, she often feels lightheaded when she ventures outside. She limps and has chronic pain in her lungs, as well as rashes that have lingered for a year. Once, a visit to the barn ended with respiratory distress and a trip to the emergency room. Schilke also has back pain linked with overworked kidneys, and on some mornings she urinates a stream of blood.


more, much more...
http://readersupportednews.org/opinion2/271-38/14816-focus-fracking-our-food-supply

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 01:06 PM

3. Fracking is insane

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Response to Playinghardball (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 01:09 PM

4. My biggest problem with it is the waste of fresh water.

 

They take perfectly good fresh water, mix it wit poison, them pump it more than a mile under the ground.

That water will never be recovered into the fresh water system, and it cannot be replaced.

That alone will come back to bite us in the butt.

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