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Wed Dec 5, 2012, 10:35 AM

University Uses TESLA Technology to WIRELESSLY CHARGE Electric Bus





Utah State University presented a first-of-its-kind electric bus that is charged through wireless charging technology in a demonstration Nov. 15.


The Aggie Bus rolled onto the streets carrying passengers just 16 months after USU demonstrated the first high-power, high-efficiency wireless power transfer system capable of transferring enough energy to quickly charge an electric vehicle. In July 2011, the USU Research Foundation demonstrated 90 percent electrical transfer efficiency of five kilowatts over an air gap of 10 inches. The demonstration validated that electric vehicles can efficiently be charged with wireless technology.





]WAVE's mission is to revolutionize the transit industry by providing wireless charging technology for use in electric vehicles of all sizes. Battery limitations represent the largest roadblock to full scale electric vehicle market adoption. WAVE's battery solution solves the limitations related to weight, cost, range, and recharge speed.




USU’s Wireless Power Transfer team, in cooperation with the Utah Science Technology and Research initiative’s Advanced Transportation Institute at USU, has designed a more efficient way to meet the nation’s transportation needs. By carefully applying a mix of modern advances in engineering and Nikola Tesla’s principles of induction, USU engineer Hunter Wu and his team have solved one of today’s vexing problems in WPT. Their research has led to the development of a robust prototype, which has been fitted to the Aggie Bus. The prototype transfers power over an air gap where no physical contact is required. Wireless power transfer technology delivers a multitude of benefits to consumers that include greater reliability due to no moving parts or cords, added convenience through the elimination of plug-in charging, the assurance of safety by removing the risk of electrocution and aesthetically pleasing devices as a result of no visible wiring.


USU’s Aggie Bus has achieved several significant milestones. It is the first bus developed and designed by a North American organization that is charged with wireless power transfer technology and is the world’s first electric bus with WPT technology combining the three following performance metrics: A power level up to 25 kilowatts, greater than 90 percent efficiency from the power grid to the battery and a maximum misalignment of up to six inches.


“The unveiling of the Aggie Bus today is a historic achievement and a great leap forward in the science and engineering related to electric vehicles,” said Robert T. Behunin, USU vice president of commercialization and regional development. “As a result of the work done by Utah State engineers, scientists and partners, EV owners and operators will now be able to simply drive over a pad in the ground to recharge their batteries, the benefits of which reach far beyond convenience.”






http://www.usu.edu/ust/index.cfm?article=51862

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Reply University Uses TESLA Technology to WIRELESSLY CHARGE Electric Bus (Original post)
Segami Dec 2012 OP
leveymg Dec 2012 #1
Segami Dec 2012 #2
leveymg Dec 2012 #3
Segami Dec 2012 #4
Edweird Dec 2012 #5
leveymg Dec 2012 #6
Edweird Dec 2012 #7
Paulie Dec 2012 #8
slackmaster Dec 2012 #12
longship Dec 2012 #9
jberryhill Dec 2012 #13
leveymg Dec 2012 #16
Science Geek Dec 2012 #17
jberryhill Dec 2012 #21
Edweird Dec 2012 #24
slackmaster Dec 2012 #10
jberryhill Dec 2012 #11
dmallind Dec 2012 #15
Science Geek Dec 2012 #19
dmallind Dec 2012 #20
jberryhill Dec 2012 #23
Science Geek Dec 2012 #18
jberryhill Dec 2012 #22
sarisataka Dec 2012 #14
Edweird Dec 2012 #25

Response to Segami (Original post)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 10:40 AM

1. What effect does the electromagnetic field have for on-board computers?

What about people nearby?

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Response to leveymg (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 10:46 AM

2. Excerpt from WAVE INC.

Most people are familiar with energy transfer by electricity since it already powers lights and a tremendous share of consumer devices. In all cases, there is a voltage and current associated with energy transfer by electricity. Maxwell’s laws tell us that anytime there is a current, it also induces a magnetic field in the space surrounding the flow of the current and vice versa such that anytime a magnetic field moves it induces a current in a nearby wire. Magnetic induction is the principle upon which WPT systems are built.
The figure below illustrates how induction can be used to transfer power wirelessly. First, a power source such as the electrical grid is transformed to have certain desirable characteristics of current, voltage, and fluctuation speed (frequency). This power travels through wires just as in most electrical applications. Next, the wire moves through a special geometry and surrounding made of particular materials. The flow of current in the wire induces a specially shaped and fluctuating magnetic field that permeates the WPT hardware and the air, water, road materials, etc. Most materials are not susceptible to this magnetic field and are not damaged or altered by them. However, if another set of wire and field susceptible materials are brought into the field, it now induces a current in them. That current carries energy from the original power source and can be transformed and manipulated into forms useful for many applications (such as battery charging in electric vehicles).



The basics of WPT have been understood by scientists for at least a century, but until recently, the required materials for wire and magnetic field shaping were unavailable. Further, the desirable characteristics of current, voltage, and frequency were unattainable with electronic circuitry. Over the last 15 years, these barriers have been eliminated, and researchers around the world have learned how to apply the principles of magnetic induction to ever more capable systems.

http://waveipt.com/content/technology

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Response to Segami (Reply #2)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 10:58 AM

3. Looked at the site, unfortunately saw nothing that addresses those questions.

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Response to leveymg (Reply #3)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 11:12 AM

4. You might want to contact WAVE with your queries.


info@waveipt.com


http://waveipt.com/contact





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Response to leveymg (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 11:21 AM

5. None and none.

 

I work on the powerlines. If they caused any issues whatsoever there would be an epidemic among lineman and I would know about it. There aren't that many of us and we gossip beyond belief - nothing like that would remain a secret for longer than it took for somebody to pick up a phone. We have laptops on the job and our cell phones in the air with us in MUCH stronger electromagnetic fields than anyone on or around the bus will experience. Additionally, some of the testing equipment that we rely on - that our very lives depend on - are electronic. If these fields rendered them inoperable we wouldn't be able to use them. I regularly work around voltages as high as 500,000 volts (that's right - half a million) and there's no way anything related to this bus will be close to that in any way shape or form. It's a non-issue.

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Response to Edweird (Reply #5)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 11:25 AM

6. The high tension lines you work on are insulated - this TESLA stuff is an open, wireless field.

Not sure that the effects would be the same.

I'm only asking.

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Response to leveymg (Reply #6)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 11:36 AM

7. No, they are not insulated.

 

They are aluminum strands with a steel core. Furthermore, even if they were insulated it would have no effect on the inductive properties.

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Response to leveymg (Reply #6)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 11:38 AM

8. My 10 year old toothbrush uses magnetic induction for charging

It's so old it had NiCad batteries.

There is also a Ted video showing wireless power as well: http://on.ted.com/2V

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Response to Paulie (Reply #8)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 11:59 AM

12. My family had one in the 1960s that used induction for charging

 

The body of the toothbrush was watertight, with no exposed electrical contacts.

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Response to leveymg (Reply #6)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 11:38 AM

9. Insulation has minimal effect on magnetic fields.

nt

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Response to leveymg (Reply #6)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 12:00 PM

13. The EM fields around high tension lines....

...radiate more power than an open core inductively coupled transformer (which is what this is).

Linemen have an increased risk of myeloid leukemia:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1568699/

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #13)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 12:10 PM

16. Thanks

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #13)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 12:18 PM

17. Causation?

Can we say the causation is EM radiation, or could it be all the nasty chemicals that had been used for years in leaky transformers that linemen were replacing? Linemen are exposed to far more than EM radiation.

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Response to Science Geek (Reply #17)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 12:55 PM

21. There is no proven link

There is a mild correlation, which indeed could have to do with PCB exposure, among other things.

The point being that the stray fields from a well-coupled induction charger are likely not what one is exposed to near a kV line.

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #13)

Sat Dec 15, 2012, 06:52 AM

24. Ionizing radiation causes that not EMF.

 

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Response to Segami (Original post)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 11:42 AM

10. This is nothing new. Inductive chargers for cell phones and other small applicances have been...

 

...available for years. This is just a scaled-up one.

http://wireless-charger-review.toptenreviews.com/

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Response to slackmaster (Reply #10)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 11:56 AM

11. ...and pacemakers, implantable pumps, and so on....


The big deal appears to be that since they mentioned Tesla's name in their PR blurb, then it gets certain people excited. CAD modeling and simulation, along with materials engineering, has allowed improvements to inductively-coupled charging systems, but these changes are evolutionary, not revolutionary.

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Response to jberryhill (Reply #11)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 12:10 PM

15. If this isn't a big deal, why do I still have to plug in my car?

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Response to dmallind (Reply #15)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 12:20 PM

19. Cost, Weight, Design Issues, Losses...

An air-core transformer to charge your car would likely cost more than your car. The half that would need to reside in your car would add considerable weight, the car would need to be designed from the ground up to incorporate wireless charging. The losses involved with inductive charging are considerable, I would wager that it isn't half as efficient as plug-charging your car, meaning your electric bill would more than double.

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Response to Science Geek (Reply #19)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 12:40 PM

20. Thanks, but there was a conditional on that question

It's still a big deal - just an expensive big deal.

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Response to Science Geek (Reply #19)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 01:01 PM

23. The interesting part


Seems to be that they are reporting 90% efficiency with better shapes, materials, and probably frequencies etc. (that last part from the general improvements in solid state commutation).

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Response to slackmaster (Reply #10)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 12:19 PM

18. Pretty much...

Perhaps a little better field shaping (focusing).

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Response to Science Geek (Reply #18)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 12:57 PM

22. Yeah, that's the entire game

And it will have one big honking "If you have a pacemaker, GTFO" sticker on it.

The other thing, which is more relevant to a car than a bus, is the big honking inductor that needs to be carried inside the vehicle, which contributes nothing to propulsion and must necessarily add considerable weight.

Ah... I see you hit the weight issue above.

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Response to Segami (Original post)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 12:05 PM

14. I have always liked

Tesla's process. I understand why they chose Edison's model but wondered why no one ever went back to see if Tesla's could work on a large scale.

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Response to sarisataka (Reply #14)

Sat Dec 15, 2012, 06:57 AM

25. Edison was all about DC. Tesla is the father of alternating current.

 

Tesla's idea is what comes out of your wall socket. Edison's idea is what starts your car.

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