HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » Should those in the medic...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:22 AM

 

Should those in the medical profession who have lost their empathy quit?

This post is brought on by my ex-fiancée's current visit and subsequent admission to the hospital along with a few recent posts here on DU by a medical services provider.

80% of the staff was great....but the other 20% just f**ks it up for the ones that still care.

I have no problem voicing my opinion, which I did last night and will again, if necessary, until he is released.

IMHO, if one is burnt out working certain jobs, such as in the medical field, the legal fields, the teaching field....any public service field....they need to move on.

Sorry about the crappy sentence structure, but I've been up all night. And I know about empathy......as you'll notice this is my ex-fiancé.

That is all.

22 replies, 1342 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 22 replies Author Time Post
Reply Should those in the medical profession who have lost their empathy quit? (Original post)
blueamy66 Dec 2012 OP
hobbit709 Dec 2012 #1
blueamy66 Dec 2012 #9
hobbit709 Dec 2012 #15
HereSince1628 Dec 2012 #2
LuvNewcastle Dec 2012 #3
JVS Dec 2012 #4
blueamy66 Dec 2012 #10
nolabear Dec 2012 #5
Scuba Dec 2012 #8
NC_Nurse Dec 2012 #14
we can do it Dec 2012 #16
blueamy66 Dec 2012 #19
KurtNYC Dec 2012 #6
blueamy66 Dec 2012 #11
LisaLynne Dec 2012 #7
blueamy66 Dec 2012 #12
LisaLynne Dec 2012 #13
blueamy66 Dec 2012 #20
riverwalker Dec 2012 #17
Romulox Dec 2012 #18
Aristus Dec 2012 #21
FarCenter Dec 2012 #22

Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:25 AM

1. Sometimes you're stuck in a job because there is no other.

And the effort of putting on a happy face becomes a little too much when you're already worn down.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hobbit709 (Reply #1)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:46 AM

9. Okay, I'll agree with you

 

Buy when a loved one is terribly ill, it's hard to understand.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Reply #9)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 10:27 AM

15. No, it isn't

3 1/2 years ago I spent 4 hours in the ER waiting to find out if Donna was going to make it. Worst time of my life.

But I realized that what I was going through, the people there went through at least once a day. I know a doctor, who when he lost a patient would be unapproachable for about 48 hours.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:27 AM

2. Don't think too badly of them...2 recent medical discoveries are depressing them

1) WalMart is going into the medical services industry

2) WalMart is getting H1B visas for Africa's Barefoot Doctors.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:37 AM

3. Unfortunately, we need those people.

I've known several people who have gone into medical professions because the money is good and the jobs are pretty secure. Those aren't ideal reasons to go into the medical field and I would much rather have someone who feels a 'calling' taking care of me, but I would rather have mediocre care than no care at all. There are reasons why those jobs are so secure: they're difficult jobs that require a lot of expensive schooling and there are never enough people to fill them.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:37 AM

4. Those workers have to pay the bills, so they have incentive not to quit. Would you support a...

disability claim by burnt-out workers until they can be placed into another field?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JVS (Reply #4)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:48 AM

10. If those workers had a human being's life in their hands:..

 

Yes, I would support that.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:40 AM

5. No, they should get some support and help to regain it.

If they're normally empathic people who are burnt out and deeply defended against feeling because of the rigors (and it's rigorous as hell to deal with sick people) of the job, then there should be a provision for easing their problems and helping them to support one another. We need people badly and it's a hard, hard, hard profession.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to nolabear (Reply #5)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:45 AM

8. +1

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to nolabear (Reply #5)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 10:27 AM

14. Perhaps if we were treated with respect and valued for the enormous

amount of work we do it would be easier not to burn out.

I am always kind to my patients, but some days it's harder than others.

And it would be nice if some patients would reflect on their own behavior occasionally.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to NC_Nurse (Reply #14)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 10:35 AM

16. +1

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to NC_Nurse (Reply #14)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 10:39 AM

19. Hey, we behaved just fine. Most of the staff was/is great.

 

But, how does someone who has been throwing up blood for a day and a half and can no longer stand up "reflect on their own behavior"?

People that go into the ER medical profession are special people...I'll give you that.

I don't know.... there were some people that I deemed didn't belong in the ER...texting and laughing in the ER, waiting to be seen....but who am I to judge?

It's a tough call I guess.

Off to the hospital for the day.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:44 AM

6. I can't judge anyone who can deal with sickness, injuries, death and raw human emotions

every day of their job. I would think one would need to develop some tolerance just to maintain focus and be effective, and that may look like a lack of empathy.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to KurtNYC (Reply #6)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:49 AM

11. Good post

 

Thanks for the insight.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:44 AM

7. I don't know, but a friend of mine ...

who is a teacher was feeling really burned out a couple of years ago after 15 years of teaching. She quit, went into another field for two years, and then went back with a renewed enthusiasm for teaching.

She was very lucky to be able to do that. In a perfect world, maybe we could have a system in place where people could take a break from the career they spend years and lots of money preparing for. That actually might be a really good thing, but in the meantime, I think for the most part it's just unfeasible for most to do that.

I do understand your frustration, though, but the medical field is VERY stressful, as you know, and yeah, people burn out.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LisaLynne (Reply #7)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:53 AM

12. True, they are stressed out.

 

But don't get me wrong...most were quite awesome....it's the few that aren't that ruin it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Reply #12)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 09:55 AM

13. Yeah, I really do understand your point.

I've been there myself. And I think one of the big problems is that with medical issues, we ourselves are scared, freaked out, nervous ... we NEED compassion and caring from the medical staff who are taking care of us. When they can't/don't provide that, it's really hard. So, yeah, we need some sort of relief for them because it would benefit us all.

I hope all goes well with your ex-finance.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LisaLynne (Reply #13)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 10:41 AM

20. Thank you.

 

I can't NOT be there for him.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 10:36 AM

17. they have empathy

sometimes staff is so focused on the patient they neglect the families/spouse needs. If he indeed is that critically ill, their concern may be interpreted as "lack of empathy".

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 10:37 AM

18. The AMA severely limits the number of US trained doctors allowed each year. This is one

consequence of their monopoly.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 10:46 AM

21. I still love what I do, and I love most of my patients.

There are many, many rewards. Just yesterday, for example, I diagnosed a patient with a previously unknown cardiac conductivity disorder. He's a little stressed out, and there are visits to a cardiologist in his future, but at least now we know the cause of his symptoms, and we can treat him. That's a great feeling.

But there will always be those who just want to scam me for narcotics or benzodiazipines ('cause nothing else WORKS, man!), or patients who never get their chronic illnesses under control because they won't comply with their treatment plans, or even perfectly well-intentioned people who, no matter how much I educate them on the subject, continue to request antibiotics for viral illnesses.

It's like any other job; you have to take the bad with the good. But there's an added level of stress when people lives are often at stake. And the good so often swiftly follows the bad. I'll come out of a visit with an abusive patient, and sit down with one of my adored patients. I try very hard to ensure that my good patient doesn't get any of the anger and resentment I'm still feeling toward the bad one, and it usually works. but sometimes, those frustratrions come through.

Still, I wouldn't trade what I do for anything else...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to blueamy66 (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 11:40 AM

22. Only if they are less expert in treating patients -- empathy and $2.52 will buy you a latte.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread