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Mon Dec 3, 2012, 05:30 PM

Downward mobility haunts US education

The idea of going to college - and the expectation that the next generation will be better educated and more prosperous than its predecessor - has been hardwired into the ambitions of the middle classes in the United States.

But there are deep-seated worries about whether this upward mobility is going into reverse.

Andreas Schleicher, special adviser on education at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), says the US is now the only major economy in the world where the younger generation is not going to be better educated than the older.

"It's something of great significance because much of today's economic power of the United States rests on a very high degree of adult skills - and that is now at risk," says Mr Schleicher.

"These skills are the engine of the US economy and the engine is stuttering," says Mr Schleicher, one of the world's most influential experts on international education comparisons.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-20154358

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Response to FarCenter (Original post)

Mon Dec 3, 2012, 05:45 PM

1. Three oft ignored facts. 1. Not all children are capable of STEM programs, 2. there are not millions

 

of STEM jobs available, and 3. non-STEM degrees are a dime a dozen and too often the result of diploma mills.

I personally know several people who began as welders, plumbers, electricians, and carpenters who are millionaires.

They make more money and contribute more jobs to society than than many lawyers and arguably all politicians.

I also have many, too many friends with non-STEM degrees with jobs not more demanding than "Welcome to WalMart".

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Response to jody (Reply #1)

Mon Dec 3, 2012, 06:00 PM

3. As the holder of one of these so-called STEM degrees, you are absolutely correct.

 

There is no shortage of STEM workers, there is simple widespread collusion to not hire those of us that once made a good living and have passed the magic age of 40.

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Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #3)

Mon Dec 3, 2012, 06:14 PM

4. Laughs because you are correct at age 40 so imagine the dismay at age 77!

 

Want to wish you a good day but I sense that would be unsuitable.

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Response to jody (Reply #4)

Mon Dec 3, 2012, 08:10 PM

5. Not at all. Every day is a good day to me (well, almost), I just can't work in my field.

 

I have other interests and am lucky enough to be good at whatever I do and have a wonderful woman and friends around me.

So thank you very much, and a very good to you as well.

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Response to jody (Reply #1)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 01:14 AM

7. yes and no

I agree that not every child will excel at STEM, and I think Obama is putting too much emphasis on STEM. Our entire public school system needs more funding, flexibility in its curriculum, and more focus on critical thinking, not just more STEM. However, engineering jobs are almost always in demand as are healthcare jobs. My husband was a telecom engineer and they always had a hard time filling positions because they couldn't find qualified applicants.

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Response to liberal_at_heart (Reply #7)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 07:16 AM

9. Agree STEM jobs are hard to fill because there are not enough "qualified" applicants. Agree with you

 

our education system is broken particularly for gifted students.

Gathered data a decade ago that showed for every $11 we spent on the bottom 2.5% of students in all K-12 schools, we spent 2 cents on the top 2.5% of students.

Those in the top 2.5% and others near the top are the ones best qualified for STEM degrees and similar fields.

I don't want to take away funds from the bottom 2.5% in fact I want it increased but, I do demand equal funding for the top 2.5%.

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Response to FarCenter (Original post)

Mon Dec 3, 2012, 05:56 PM

2. downward mobility haunts US, period. 2000-to present median household income declined 8%.

 

The bottom 25% of the population already experienced this downward mobility in the previous decades. welcome to capitalism.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #2)

Mon Dec 3, 2012, 09:34 PM

6. +100000

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Response to FarCenter (Original post)

Tue Dec 4, 2012, 01:18 AM

8. upward mobility for private industrial prison complex.

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