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Sat Dec 1, 2012, 02:51 PM

Bread that lasts for 60 days could cut food waste (BBC)

By Matt McGrath
Environment correspondent, BBC News

An American company has developed a technique that it says can make bread stay mould-free for 60 days.

The bread is zapped in a sophisticated microwave array which kills the spores that cause the problem.

The company claims it could significantly reduce the amount of wasted bread - in the UK alone, almost a third of loaves purchased.

The technique can also be used with a wide range of foods including fresh turkey and many fruits and vegetables.

World of waste

Food waste is a massive problem in most developed countries. In the US, figures released this year suggest that the average American family throws away 40% of the food they purchase - which adds up to $165bn (102bn) annually.
***
more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-20540758




Not sure where best to post this -- science? environment? cooking & baking? So to GD it goes.

57 replies, 3019 views

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Reply Bread that lasts for 60 days could cut food waste (BBC) (Original post)
eppur_se_muova Dec 2012 OP
jody Dec 2012 #1
eppur_se_muova Dec 2012 #4
patrice Dec 2012 #14
RebelOne Dec 2012 #56
robinlynne Dec 2012 #5
gollygee Dec 2012 #6
think Dec 2012 #36
patrice Dec 2012 #16
Posteritatis Dec 2012 #24
hobbit709 Dec 2012 #2
patrice Dec 2012 #3
gollygee Dec 2012 #7
Kurska Dec 2012 #9
Berlum Dec 2012 #39
Kurska Dec 2012 #42
Berlum Dec 2012 #44
muriel_volestrangler Dec 2012 #47
Posteritatis Dec 2012 #23
gollygee Dec 2012 #27
Vinnie From Indy Dec 2012 #33
gollygee Dec 2012 #34
Posteritatis Dec 2012 #40
Confusious Dec 2012 #54
JackRiddler Dec 2012 #45
patrice Dec 2012 #8
laundry_queen Dec 2012 #11
patrice Dec 2012 #18
laundry_queen Dec 2012 #25
patrice Dec 2012 #19
HiPointDem Dec 2012 #10
XemaSab Dec 2012 #12
NoOneMan Dec 2012 #17
Ya Basta Dec 2012 #20
NoOneMan Dec 2012 #13
LeftInTX Dec 2012 #49
Ya Basta Dec 2012 #15
gollygee Dec 2012 #21
muriel_volestrangler Dec 2012 #48
gollygee Dec 2012 #55
muriel_volestrangler Dec 2012 #57
GoCubsGo Dec 2012 #22
hedgehog Dec 2012 #26
jmowreader Dec 2012 #30
GoCubsGo Dec 2012 #37
laundry_queen Dec 2012 #28
Blue_In_AK Dec 2012 #38
ChisolmTrailDem Dec 2012 #32
jmowreader Dec 2012 #29
gollygee Dec 2012 #31
On the Road Dec 2012 #50
Cleita Dec 2012 #35
morningglory Dec 2012 #41
Cleita Dec 2012 #43
Posteritatis Dec 2012 #51
Incitatus Dec 2012 #52
JackRiddler Dec 2012 #46
Liberal_in_LA Dec 2012 #53

Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 02:54 PM

1. Easier and cheaper, just give over-age bread to those below the poverty level. nt

 

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Response to jody (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:01 PM

4. A lot of that molds before anyone can use it.

Our local food bank has more bread to hand out than anything else, and a lot of it gets discarded because of mold. Stores usually dump the bread on or a day before the sell-by date, but if there is any delay delivering it to the distribution point, much of it is lost to mold. Since they are only open three days a week, there is up to four days delay guaranteed ...

Any such bread needs to be stored in the refrigator or freezer, or it will start to mold before it can all be used up.

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Reply #4)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:20 PM

14. We had that experience with our Occupy. EVERYONE bringing us old bread. It was a nightmare. nt

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Reply #4)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 07:21 PM

56. I do not eat much bread, but there are times when I must buy it,

but it molds within a week or so. I then have to throw it out. That's why I buy Kroger's store brand at 99 cents a loaf.

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Response to jody (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:01 PM

5. when it is moldy, it is moldy.

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Response to jody (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:07 PM

6. Poor people should eat moldy bread?

Huh?

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Response to gollygee (Reply #6)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:26 PM

36. and muffin stumps

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Response to jody (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:22 PM

16. Better that those below poverty level should have the opportunity to make

their own bread, when/as they need it.

Yes, I'm suggesting co - operative bakeries.

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Response to jody (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:48 PM

24. I know a lot of DUers hate the poor, but goddamn does this post exemplify that. (nt)

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 02:56 PM

2. But what does 60 day old bread taste like?

Bread doesn't last me a week much less two months.
But then I don't buy commercial made white bread either.

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 02:59 PM

3. uh, NO! thank you.

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:08 PM

7. There are a few too many frankenfoods already

How about having the option to buy a half loaf of bread?

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Response to gollygee (Reply #7)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:11 PM

9. No frakenfood here, all they are doing is zapping the bread with a type of microwave

That kills a lot of the stuff that causes mold. It is essentially the same concept as pasteurization, but with microwaves.

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Response to Kurska (Reply #9)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:40 PM

39. Yup it KILLS DEAD all the life in the food

Yippee - Corporate Food-like Product Substance will henceforth be Immortal...!!!!

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Response to Berlum (Reply #39)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:43 PM

42. I wasn't aware that people considered fungal spores "Value added" in their bread n/t

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Response to Kurska (Reply #42)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:54 PM

44. No one with an iota of wit would infer that. IT kills ALL LIFE, not just fungal spores

So eat all the lifeless souless food-like corporate product you want. You have free choice. It's your bod.

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT.


I will stick with clean, natural, organic life-infused foods that do -- in fact -- rot and go bad after a spell of time. That's my free will choice, and my right.



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Response to Berlum (Reply #44)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 05:59 PM

47. Is it important to you that your digestive system gets to kill organisms?

Rather than killing them before they get into your mouth?

You know, cooking food kills all kinds of lifeforms too. Or are you someone (there are a few) who refuses to eat anything cooked, too?

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Response to gollygee (Reply #7)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:47 PM

23. There's also too many people ignorantly kneejerking without reading the articles, apparently.

Frankenfood? Come on.

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Response to Posteritatis (Reply #23)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:02 PM

27. I read it

It looks like and sounds like irradiation, but that they're trying to make it sound better by saying "kind of like a microwave." Why don't they call it irradiation?

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Response to gollygee (Reply #27)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:14 PM

33. Microwaving anything would be irradiating it

Cheers!

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Response to Vinnie From Indy (Reply #33)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:16 PM

34. Yeah but they specifically chose not to say "irradiate"

Everyone knows what it means and it's been in the news, but they purposely said "Like putting in a microwave" instead of using the word "irradiation" and I think they did that because people are not fond of irradiation and they don't want people to make that connection.

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Response to gollygee (Reply #27)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:41 PM

40. Because people cast 20 points of IQ aside whenever they hear the R-word.

Also, because science journalists are almost without exception incompetent at explaining things.

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Response to gollygee (Reply #27)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 06:39 PM

54. there's a difference between a microwave and radiation.


"radiation" is the term used for alpha, beta, gamma and neutron particles.

microwaves are closer to radio signals then gamma radiation.

(Microwaves are 1Ghz to 170Ghz, Gamma 10 exahertz)

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Response to Posteritatis (Reply #23)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 05:00 PM

45. You mean the ones who seriously re-publish the company

press release as a news article? Even though the headlined claim is on-its-face ridiculous?

Yeah, that's knee-jerking.

All anyone wants to know about sixty-day bread expiration periods is what the health consequences might be.

Saying it will reduce food waste is like claiming that integrating soda can tops into the can was a significant blow against aluminum waste.

There's a way to reduce close to 100% of food waste already, and it's called composting.

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:10 PM

8. I'm not sure about 60 days, but I have had loaves of HEMP bread that were extraordinarily

resistant to mold. I have seen this repeated with more than one or two loaves and a duration of up to maybe a month in which a given loaf developed no mold. I didn't test it systematically, but I definitely noticed that hemp bread is much more durable than any other kind of bread and I think it might be because hemp has natural anti-biotic properties, or at least that's what I have heard about it.

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Response to patrice (Reply #8)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:17 PM

11. You mean anti-fungal properties?

Since while hemp does have anti-bacterial properties it would have nothing to do with mold - which is a fungus not a bacteria.

My theory on your hemp bread is this...generally the hemp or flax bread I've bought were much drier (ie less spongy/moist) than plain wheat bread. As such, they don't mold as readily because the moisture content is lower. Also, hemp DOES have anti-fungal properties - it's why when I used hemp cloth diapers on my babies, the hemp didn't get mildew smell but the cotton (And fleece covers) did. So perhaps that does play a role.

At any rate, I'd be highly unlikely to buy this bread. Sounds like twinkie bread to me.

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Response to laundry_queen (Reply #11)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:32 PM

18. Thanks for the info! I used to be able to pick up hemp bread at the Target grocery store. They

stopped carrying it.

I have also bought French Meadow from Canada, off of the internet, but then you have to pay shipping.

http://www.foodservicedirect.com/product.cfm/p/168395/French-Meadow-Bakery-Organic-Bread.htm

................

Solution? LEGALIZE hemp, now!!!

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Response to patrice (Reply #18)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:58 PM

25. I'm lucky enough

to be in Canada and there are a lot of readily available hemp products (doesn't hurt my best friend's brother and mother own a hemp clothing store so I've had a lot of hemp clothing too).

There's no reason why hemp should be illegal, so I 100% agree with your last sentence.

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Response to patrice (Reply #8)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:34 PM

19. BTW, hemp bread is not all just carbs. Hemp is a perfect/complete protein. nt

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:14 PM

10. Understand that when they say "food waste," they mean theirs. They will be selling those

 

59-day old loaves of bread as 'fresh'.

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:18 PM

12. Bread gets moldy here after it's opened

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Response to XemaSab (Reply #12)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:23 PM

17. The air is full of spores

 

Im not sure how eliminating endospores is going to keep bread from getting moldy. You can pressure cook grains & flour for 2 hours, and the minute it hits open air, it will likely get trich growing on it (I've seen this in mushroom cultivation). In fact, sterilized grains can be more prone to contamination due to lack of present competing microbes that leave the substrate wide open for colonization.

This is probably only useful to sealed, unopened bread in air-tight (or filtered) bags.

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Response to NoOneMan (Reply #17)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:36 PM

20. "I've seen this in mushroom cultivation"

 

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:18 PM

13. Is even moldy bread wasted?

 

Throw it in the compost pile and grow some food.

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Response to NoOneMan (Reply #13)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 06:08 PM

49. You got it

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:22 PM

15. Microwave radiation also destroys nutrients

 

As more and more of our food loses its nutrient levels and/or saturated with chemical additives and preservatives. The more and more degenerative diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and arthritis, etc we experience.

Reason why I choose organic.

n/t

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:36 PM

21. My mom used to put bread in the freezer

She'd buy it when it was on sale and put it in the freezer and we'd stick it in the toaster quickly to warm it up. We got good at knowing how long it would take.

Or just selling various size loafs - larger, and half-sized.

I'm not a fan of further altering food, and exposing food to radiation alters it.

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Response to gollygee (Reply #21)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 06:04 PM

48. Sticking bread in the toaster is exposing it to radiation

Lots of it. If you haven't noticed, it starts to char. And, as for how good for you that is:

Q: Can eating burnt toast give you cancer?
A: Maybe. Some chemicals in burnt toast have been linked to cancer.
...
The most well-known chemical in burnt toast is acrylamide, which is produced when sugars and certain amino acids the building blocks of proteins are heated together during the cooking process.

This potentially harmful chemical is mainly found in starchy foods such as potatoes (and other potato products), along with baked goods, including bread and, of course, toast.

The level of acrylamide in these foods increases with higher cooking temperatures and longer cooking times. "You would expect there to be reasonably high levels of acrylamide in burnt toast," says Brent.

While toast contains less acrylamide than potato chips and fries, work by FSANZ in 2004 found that toasted white bread is one of the main food sources of acrylamide in the Australian population. This is because we eat more white bread than brown, but white bread might also have slightly more acrylamide in it than other types of bread.

http://www.abc.net.au/health/talkinghealth/factbuster/stories/2011/01/25/3093063.htm#.ULqMuMWPOSo

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #48)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 07:15 PM

55. Did you read my post?

I said "put it in the poster for a mintue to warm it up" or something along those lines. We'd just defrost it in the toaster, not char it.

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Response to gollygee (Reply #55)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 07:23 PM

57. Well, if you did only have the toaster for defrosting bread to room temperature

then you're unusual. Most people also make toast with it. Nevertheless, you exposed your frozen bread to higher frequency, more energetic radiation than the microwaves in the process in the OP.

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:41 PM

22. Or, you could just freeze it. Or, make smaller loaves available.

That's what I do. I live alone. I don't eat a lot of bread--just a few slices a week. I just pull a few slices out when I need them. If I want to use the bread right away, it only takes about 15 seconds to thaw it in the microwave. If I am making toast, I just put the bread straight in the toaster oven without thawing it. It toasts just fine. And, I have never noticed any change in quality by freezing the bread.

One of my gripes with store-bought sliced bread is that the loaves are usually so damn big. I know of only one brand that sells a "1/2 loaf". And, all those nice whole-grain breads out are wide-pan, so that each slice is really a slice and a half. They have close to 200 calories/slice, which really stinks for those of us trying to watch our weight. I wish they'd make them in smaller, more reasonably-sized loafs. Perhaps less bread would be wasted if they didn't force such large portions on us.

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Response to GoCubsGo (Reply #22)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 03:59 PM

26. Smaller loaves! Are you out of your mind ! We don't have the technology for that!

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Response to hedgehog (Reply #26)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:09 PM

30. We don't have the desire for it

You can already get pound loaves. People buy the big ones Because Bigger Is Better.

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Response to jmowreader (Reply #30)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:31 PM

37. That's a good part of the problem.

Most products seem to be geared toward families, not single people or couples. It's generally cheaper to buy in bulk, and that includes things like bread, unfortunately. So, people who can't use large quantities of stuff are usually out of luck.

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Response to GoCubsGo (Reply #22)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:02 PM

28. This. ^^^

The freezing part, not the small loaves part (although I can see how that would be helpful too, it's just I have 4 kids and 1/2 loaf is pointless for me )
I freeze all my bread. I usually leave one loaf out on the counter for the kids and when it's gone, I pull another one out of the freezer. If a loaf of bread or another storebought baked good is nearing its expiration date, I split it up into plastic bags and stick it in the freezer. I did this recently with some muffins - put in them in sandwich bags in the freezer and pulled them out for the kids' lunches everyday. It helped to keep the lunch bag cool and thawed by lunchtime.

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Response to laundry_queen (Reply #28)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:35 PM

38. We freeze our bread, too.

We buy four or six loaves of Dave's Bread at Costco and freeze it as soon as we get home.

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Response to GoCubsGo (Reply #22)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:14 PM

32. "One of my gripes with store-bought sliced bread is that the loaves

are usually so damn big."

This is a problem I deal with constantly. I have a refridgerator freezer an it's just not big enough for storing bread. And the smaller loaves that are available are specialty breads and cost anywhere from $1 to $2 more per loaf.

A regular loaf of my store brand wheat is under $1. But we usually end up throwing 1/3 of that loaf out because we just can't eat it all fast enough. I would much rather buy a half-loaf. At least that way, too, we would cut down on our bread intake from not feeling like we've got to eat as much as possible in order to waste less of it.

I've tried throwing it out for the birds but they don't seem particularly interested.

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:06 PM

29. This will lead to massive job loss in the bakery businesd

Today's bread has to be delivered to stores the day it's made to give grocers a fair chance to sell it...so, there have to be a LOT of local bakeries.

Now consider...you can haul from Kansas City to anywhere in the US in 35 hours or less. Run team drivers and it's a day and a half. So...let us assume whoever buys Hostess wants to cut down on labor. If they want to practically eliminate it, building a huge long-shelf-life bread bakery in either Walcott, Iowa, or Oak Grove, Mo., and baking all the bread for North America there would do it.(Both towns have huge truck stops where you can easily hire truckers to haul bread - eliminating the expense of keeping your own truck fleet.)

It would also turn bread into a distribution center item, and this is a scary thought: if you knew you could sell 700 million loaves a week, why not build a 200 million loaf/day operation and make the bakers part timers without benefits?

The upside is the ability to respond to disasters. If a hurricane hits an area, there won't be bread for a while. With this bread you could stage loads of bread right outside the expected damage path, then haul it in as soon as the wind stops blowing.

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Response to jmowreader (Reply #29)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:10 PM

31. I wonder if that's part of the interest

It's like ultra pasteurized milk. I think it's done more for the benefit of huge dairy factory farms, so they have more time to get their product farther before it goes bad.

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Response to jmowreader (Reply #29)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 06:17 PM

50. Now THAT is the Most Sensible Response So Far

It would certainly change the dynamics of the industry. It would also probably bring prices down. This is especially important for people with limited means. White bread is pretty cheap already and it's use probably should not be encouraged, but a lot of shelf space is taken up by various kinds of whole-grain breads too.

There would also be an impact on agriculture. Some sources estimate that a third of bread is wasted in the US -- that's a lot less arable land that has to be used for wheat.

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:16 PM

35. Another way is to break up the stale bread and feed it to the birds.

It's what I do. They like it.

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:42 PM

41. If everyone had 2 chickens, there would be no problem with leftover stuff.

They convert it to great fertilize.

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Response to morningglory (Reply #41)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 04:53 PM

43. I think last count we have seven chickens. They come and go as you know.

They are great for getting rid of certain kinds of extra food that would be wasted otherwise. They also provide eggs besides fertilizer. Unfortunately, many cities have laws against keeping farm animals in their yards, including chickens, although they will allow pet rabbits. Too bad.

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Response to morningglory (Reply #41)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 06:19 PM

51. Because that's such a feasible idea. (nt)

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Response to morningglory (Reply #41)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 06:20 PM

52. That's what my dogs do nt

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 05:03 PM

46. Oh thank god they found a way to save the Twinkie.

Oh and the best place to post this would be pseudoscience. Or do we have a forum for Breathless Press Endorsements of Every New Corporate Product Claim as it Arrives?

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Original post)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 06:21 PM

53. ewww

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