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Fri Nov 30, 2012, 04:05 PM

What's in that Pork? Consumer Reports

worth a read:

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/pork0113.htm





Our analysis of pork-chop and ground-pork samples from around the U.S. found that yersinia enterocolitica, a bacterium that can cause fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain, was widespread. Some samples harbored other potentially harmful bacteria, including salmonella. And there are more reasons to be concerned about “the other white meat.”

• Yersinia enterocolitica was in 69 percent of the tested pork samples. It infects about 100,000 Americans a year, especially children. We found salmonella, staphylococcus aureus, or listeria monocytogenes, more common causes of foodborne illness, in 3 to 7 percent of samples. And 11 percent harbored enterococcus, which can indicate fecal contamination and can cause problems such as urinary-tract infections.

• Some of the bacteria we found were resistant to multiple drugs or classes of drugs. That’s worrisome, because if those bugs make you sick, your doctor may need to prescribe more powerful (and expensive) antibiotics.

• Ground pork was more likely than pork chops to harbor pathogens. That’s to be expected, since grinding meat provides another opportunity for contamination.

• Some antibiotic claims you’ll see on packaging are misleading. And a “no hormones added” claim might be true but is meaningless, because hormones aren’t allowed in pork production.


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Reply What's in that Pork? Consumer Reports (Original post)
superpatriotman Nov 2012 OP
byeya Nov 2012 #1
MineralMan Nov 2012 #2
closeupready Nov 2012 #3
kysrsoze Nov 2012 #4

Response to superpatriotman (Original post)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 04:10 PM

1. This industry produces a lethal product. Family farms, growing swine under humane conditions

 

for the most part, did not.
Bacteria resistant to antibiotics is a huge problem and we don't need to add to it by allowing factory production of pork.

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Response to superpatriotman (Original post)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 04:13 PM

2. I always cook my pork properly.

There are bacteria on most meats. Cooking properly destroys them. Thus has it always been.

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Response to superpatriotman (Original post)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 04:17 PM

3. I love pork, but due to concerns about nitrites

which are used as a preservative in bacon and hot dogs, I severely limit my intake of pork food products.

Pathogens like salmonella are also a concern, but cooking generally kills them - cooking can't kill nitrites, as it's not an organism but a chemical.

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Response to closeupready (Reply #3)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 06:52 PM

4. Nitrates are in most processed meats, but it's getting easier to find...

Processed meat, including bacon, without nitrates/nitrites. That's about all we buy these days. Trader Joe's has a lot, and most Dietz & Watson and all Applewood stuff is nitrate/nitrite-free. I even see some of this meat showing up at Aldi in small amounts.

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