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Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:38 PM

Super Ramen Noodles to the rescue??

Ramen Noodles taste descent and are super cheap, but they are not healthy and have no nutrition. I was wondering if its technologically feasible to make a sustainable descent tasting product that can be eaten constantly and will be nutritious/ beneficial for human health and is almost as cheap as ramen noodles for the sake of battling hunger/poverty.

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Arrow 34 replies Author Time Post
Reply Super Ramen Noodles to the rescue?? (Original post)
francolettieri Nov 2012 OP
JaneyVee Nov 2012 #1
Flatpicker Nov 2012 #2
zonkers Nov 2012 #4
FrodosPet Nov 2012 #18
stuntcat Nov 2012 #20
Flatpicker Nov 2012 #21
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #30
zonkers Nov 2012 #23
Lasher Nov 2012 #3
madinmaryland Nov 2012 #12
niyad Nov 2012 #13
Drunken Irishman Nov 2012 #5
Fridays Child Nov 2012 #7
ChisolmTrailDem Nov 2012 #6
surrealAmerican Nov 2012 #8
marybourg Nov 2012 #9
Nay Nov 2012 #10
RobertEarl Nov 2012 #11
niyad Nov 2012 #14
Trailrider1951 Nov 2012 #15
Doremus Nov 2012 #16
mike_c Nov 2012 #17
malaise Nov 2012 #19
Ikonoklast Nov 2012 #24
malaise Nov 2012 #25
donco Nov 2012 #22
bitchkitty Nov 2012 #26
FrodosPet Nov 2012 #31
TuxedoKat Nov 2012 #32
FrodosPet Nov 2012 #33
bitchkitty Nov 2012 #34
Victor_c3 Nov 2012 #27
minkyboodle Nov 2012 #29
Evasporque Nov 2012 #28

Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:40 PM

1. Its technologically feasible, but sadly, since it's not profitable no one will do it.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:42 PM

2. Quinoa noodles?

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Response to Flatpicker (Reply #2)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:44 PM

4. Absolutely. A delicious superfood.

So aromatic and nutty. So versatile. I can never make enough of it.

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Response to zonkers (Reply #4)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 08:25 PM

18. Quinoa: The Dark Side of an Andean Superfood

http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,2110890,00.html

As a child, Benjamin Huarachi, 55, ate quinoa almost every day, as a matter of practicality. The crop is one of few that thrive on Bolivia's high plains, 13,000 ft. (4,000 m) above sea level, explains the farmer. His impoverished family had no idea that the colorful tall tufts yield one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Nor did Huarachi imagine that his childhood staple would one day bring economic success. "Quinoa was always comida para los indios ," he says, almost laughing, "Today it's food for the world's richest."

~ snip ~

But the windfall could become a double-edged sword. In February, violence over prime quinoa-growing territory left dozens injured, and land conflict is spreading. "Sure, the price of quinoa is increasing," says Carlos Nina, a local leader in Bolivia's quinoa heartland, "but so are our problems." Apart from increasing feuds over property rights, these include the collapse of the traditional relationship between llama herding and soil fertilization, with potentially disastrous consequences of quinoa's "organic" status, and the ironic twist that the children of newly prosperous farmers no longer like eating quinoa, contributing to dietary problems

~ snip ~

----------------------------------------

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/20/world/americas/20bolivia.html

Quinoa’s Global Success Creates Quandary at Home

~ snip ~

But while Bolivians have lived off it for centuries, quinoa remained little more than a curiosity outside the Andes for years, found in health food shops and studied by researchers — until recently.

Now demand for quinoa (pronounced KEE-no-ah) is soaring in rich countries, as American and European consumers discover the “lost crop” of the Incas. The surge has helped raise farmers’ incomes here in one of the hemisphere’s poorest countries. But there has been a notable trade-off: Fewer Bolivians can now afford it, hastening their embrace of cheaper, processed foods and raising fears of malnutrition in a country that has long struggled with it.

~ snip ~

----------------------------------------

It would be awesome if it could be grown in other places besides the Andes. Great stuff - the ultimate superfood, and tasty when properly prepared - but since I started reading about it, I've been bothered by this unfortunate impact.

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Response to FrodosPet (Reply #18)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 08:42 PM

20. ooo interesting, ty for the articles

I wish it could be grown everywhere and by everyone.

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Response to stuntcat (Reply #20)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 09:02 PM

21. My understanding

Is that it could. It's a very easy to grow grain.

Just keep Monsanto away from it.

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Response to Flatpicker (Reply #21)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 08:05 AM

30. It looks like that is already on the way. There are a lot of spanish-language articles about it,

 

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Response to FrodosPet (Reply #18)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 12:30 AM

23. It is so hard to imagine every aspect of a situation. So many different

aspects to ethical eating.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:43 PM

3. I like Ramen noodles.

How are they unhealthy?

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Response to Lasher (Reply #3)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:52 PM

12. I think they have 10 times the daily recommended amount of sodium in them.

Assuming you use the spice packet.

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Response to Lasher (Reply #3)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:53 PM

13. they aren't, so long as you don't use that seasoning pack

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:45 PM

5. Soylent Green?

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Reply #5)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:47 PM

7. Beat me to it.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:47 PM

6. Plumpy’Nut®?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plumpy%27nut

Cost: $60 (2010) for a two month supply for a child.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:48 PM

8. If you want to know if you have a commercially viable plan ...

... you're going to have to do some real research on nutrition, prices of ingredients, and production processes.

I don't think you will find those answers here.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:48 PM

9. P-nut butter.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:48 PM

10. A product named Plumpy'nut has/is being produced at cost to feed starving African children

specifically. It was developed by an aid organization's doctors, I believe, and they have not patented it and are showing communities how to produce it themselves as an emergency food product. It has peanut butter, dried milk, liquid vitamins, and some other stuff. It can be stored without refrigeration.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:50 PM

11. Just drop in a Twinkie?

Seriously, an egg in the boiling pot makes for a great midnight snack.

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Response to RobertEarl (Reply #11)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 07:55 PM

14. an egg or two in the ramen, minus that disgusting seasoning pack, and a spoonful of veggies,

is a quick snack.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 08:17 PM

15. Actually, ramen noodles can be prepared in a healthy way

Don't use the seasoning packet. In addition to the noodles, buy a package each of frozen peas and carrots (about $1.50), a package of frozen brocoli cuts (about the same), and a medium onion. Cook the noodles in water according to package directions, and drain when they are done. In a medium skillet, stir fry about 1/3 cup peas and carrots, 1/3 cup brocoli cuts, and a thick slice of onion, chopped, in 2 tblspoons oil for 3 or so minutes. Add cooked noodles and a few shakes of low sodium soy sauce. Stir and cook for another minute or two and serve. Absolutely delicious! Those 2 packages of veggies and the rest of the onion will flavor a whole five day's worth of lunch or dinner (for 1 person). So, let's add up the cost: Veggies: $3.50. Ramen: $1.50. Oil and soy flavorings: $0.50. Total: $5.50. Cost per meal: $5.50 / 5 = $1.10 per meal. If you have room to grow some of your own veggies, it is even less costly. Also, if you're tired of the noodles, the same dish can be made with leftover rice (which actually cooks up better than freshly made rice). Bon Apetite!

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 08:22 PM

16. Beans & rice or a baked potato.

They have all the nutrition you need.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 08:22 PM

17. I suspect you don't know much about ramen noodles....

Ramen noodles are quite nutritious, but you wouldn't know that if your only experience was with the instant cup-o-brine that most Americans eat. But the noodles are a fine carbohydrate source, and they're tasty. So throw away the "instant" seasoning packet and make your ramen with real meat stock, some veggies and greens (or seaweed), a small portion of meat, a bit of sesame or chili oil, a sprinkle of chopped green onions, and a reasonable seasoning with salt or some good soy sauce. Good, nutritious, and fast food.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 08:26 PM

19. I hope your noodles are not descending

You mean decent?

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Response to malaise (Reply #19)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 12:43 AM

24. Maybe the OP is really The Flying Spaghetti Monster?

Touching us from above with His Noodly Appendage!












Or His Meatballs are finally descending.


Late bloomer.



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Response to Ikonoklast (Reply #24)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 01:42 AM

25. ROFL

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 09:14 PM

22. This thread

got me to looking for our food/recipe thread that was on old DP.Sadly i cant find it.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 01:45 AM

26. Ramen is disgusting filth.

Don't put that shit in your body. Eat rice.

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Response to bitchkitty (Reply #26)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 08:14 AM

31. Avoid gulf coast and brown rice, though - particularly when pregnant

This sux because I LOVE rice...but it is what it is!

---------------------------------------------------

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505269_162-57515656/reported-arsenic-levels-in-rice-prompt-concern

Reported arsenic levels in rice prompt concern

(CBS News) Consumer Reports found significant levels of arsenic in apple juice earlier this year, and now, the magazine has a new study, showing many brands of rice also contain the toxin.

The arsenic enters into the rice when it is grown, according to Dr. Philip Landrigan, a pediatrician at New York's Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He explained the rice with the highest levels of arsenic is from Texas and Louisiana, and along the Gulf coast where fields were used to grow cotton a century ago.

~ snip ~

Arsenic causes lung, skin and bladder cancer, Landrigan said. He added that arsenic is also very harmful to babies' brain development. If a baby is exposed to arsenic in the womb because the mother is eating arsenic or if a baby ingests arsenic in the first months of life in cereal, rice milk or other food, the arsenic could interfere with brain development, reduce the child's intelligence, and cause behavioral problems.

Landrigan recommended in the coming months and years that parents avoid rice altogether or just rice that was grown in Texas, Louisiana, and Missouri. "Stay with California rice, stay with Asian rice or when in doubt go with barley, go with oatmeal," he said. "The smart thing to do is to be concerned and not do it. ... Just avoid the rice."

~ snip ~

---------------------------------------------------

I am running out of ideas about what I CAN eat. Even the healthiest foods either have dangers, or unfortunate socioeconomic consequences. It seems like simply being alive is dangerous to your health.

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Response to FrodosPet (Reply #31)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 09:16 AM

32. Have you tried black rice?

It's actually more dark purple. I emailed the company after I bought some about arsenic levels and was advised (by the CEO) that there rice was tested regularly for arsenic and it was not a problem with their rice. I can't remember exactly what she said, but if you want I can find her email. The rice is very tasty too.

http://www.amazon.com/Lotus-Foods-Heirloom-Forbidden-Black/dp/B00198C89I/ref=cm_cr_pr_sims_t

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Response to TuxedoKat (Reply #32)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 11:05 AM

33. A big part of it is geography

From what I have been reading, a lot of soil naturally contains arsenic. It is a naturally occurring element, right there on the periodic chart, and not a man made chemical. Beyond the "background" levels though, it was used in pesticides popular with cotton farmers for many years. As well, there apparently is some in chicken feed, which becomes chicken poop, which becomes organic fertilizer.

California and Asia has the lowest levels, the Gulf Coast has the highest.

The rice you pointed out looks pretty good, but it was a bit of sticker shock. Right now, with my hours reduced due to my health, my food budget is about $100 a month, so I need to maximize my calories per dollar - and I still need my apples, carrots, peppers, chicken, lentils, tomatoes and tomato sauce, broccoli, lemon juice, etc.

If and when things turn around, I do want to check it out. Thank you for the pointer.

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Response to FrodosPet (Reply #31)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 07:10 PM

34. I like white rice anyway.

I usually buy it at the Asian food store or I buy an Asian brand (short grain, yum.) Love it! I eat it plain, all by its lonesome. It's a wonderful energy food.

I don't need the fiber of brown since rice is one of the few cooked foods that I eat. But brown rice would be better. Anything is better than wheat.

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 05:40 AM

27. Why don't they make a pelletized human food that you can buy in a 50 pound bag like dog food?

I wish I was able to enjoy the convenience of kibble. It works for my dog and my cat. Why couldn't it work for me?

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Response to francolettieri (Original post)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 07:44 AM

28. there is already....3/4 of the world sustain themselves on it...

it is called rice

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