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Mon Nov 26, 2012, 07:46 PM

I really, really, really NEED Obamacare

Over the last few days, I have been hospitalized due to a thyroid storm.

Thyroid storm, also referred to as thyrotoxic crisis, is an acute, life-threatening, hypermetabolic state induced by excessive release of thyroid hormones (THs) in individuals with thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid storm may be the initial presentation of thyrotoxicosis in undiagnosed children, particularly in neonates. The clinical presentation includes fever, tachycardia, hypertension, and neurological and GI abnormalities. Hypertension may be followed by congestive heart failure that is associated with hypotension and shock. Because thyroid storm is almost invariably fatal if left untreated, rapid diagnosis and aggressive treatment are critical. Fortunately, this condition is extremely rare in children.
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/925147-overview


So, I'm a 60 yr. old woman living on my husband's survivor social security benefits. I get $1309.00 per month.

That puts me over the limit to qualify for Medicaid.

I can't afford insurance, and would have this claim denied because I had hyperthyroid when I had a child 22 years ago.

I need medical treatment. Life or death.

And, I can't afford it.

58 replies, 3840 views

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Arrow 58 replies Author Time Post
Reply I really, really, really NEED Obamacare (Original post)
Glitterati Nov 2012 OP
Walk away Nov 2012 #1
JaneyVee Nov 2012 #2
Glitterati Nov 2012 #3
banned from Kos Nov 2012 #4
Glitterati Nov 2012 #6
yardwork Nov 2012 #12
Glitterati Nov 2012 #13
yardwork Nov 2012 #14
Glitterati Nov 2012 #15
yardwork Nov 2012 #17
JaneyVee Nov 2012 #5
Glitterati Nov 2012 #7
JaneyVee Nov 2012 #9
Glitterati Nov 2012 #10
lalalu Nov 2012 #54
SammyWinstonJack Nov 2012 #8
tnlurker Nov 2012 #11
Glitterati Nov 2012 #19
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #16
Glitterati Nov 2012 #20
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #21
nobodyspecial Nov 2012 #23
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #27
LiberalAndProud Nov 2012 #31
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #49
LiberalAndProud Nov 2012 #52
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #57
Glitterati Nov 2012 #34
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #50
SheilaT Nov 2012 #26
brokechris Nov 2012 #29
Glitterati Nov 2012 #35
SheilaT Nov 2012 #38
Glitterati Nov 2012 #39
Tsiyu Nov 2012 #40
SheilaT Nov 2012 #42
lalalu Nov 2012 #55
ProfessionalLeftist Nov 2012 #37
Illinoischick Nov 2012 #18
TheKentuckian Nov 2012 #22
TheKentuckian Nov 2012 #24
satxdem Nov 2012 #25
Glitterati Nov 2012 #36
Tsiyu Nov 2012 #41
satxdem Nov 2012 #58
Roselma Nov 2012 #28
brokechris Nov 2012 #30
Glitterati Nov 2012 #33
Glitterati Nov 2012 #32
Roselma Nov 2012 #48
Glitterati Nov 2012 #43
LiberalAndProud Nov 2012 #45
TrueBlueinCO Nov 2012 #44
LiberalAndProud Nov 2012 #46
TrueBlueinCO Nov 2012 #47
southernyankeebelle Nov 2012 #51
lalalu Nov 2012 #53
Democratopia Nov 2012 #56

Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 07:52 PM

1. What state do you live in? nt

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 07:54 PM

2. Where do you live?

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 07:57 PM

3. Georgia

ARRRRRRRRRRGH

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #3)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:02 PM

4. You would qualify for Medicaid under Obamacare at 130% of poverty

 

but not until 2014.

I wish you the best until then. Please have hope.

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Response to banned from Kos (Reply #4)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:10 PM

6. I really dont know if I can make it through another "storm" like this

I already have congestive heart failure from this one.

I have 2 options - do an iodine burn of the thyroid, or surgery to remove the thyroid to prevent another storm.

I can't afford either.

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #6)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:41 PM

12. Talk to the hospital's finance department. They may be able to work with you.

You may qualify for reduced rates or a payment plan. Tell your doctors that you need to talk with the hospital about a finance plan.

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Response to yardwork (Reply #12)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:49 PM

13. LOL, had that conversation today

Here are my choices:
1. Have insurance
2. Make payments on the bill monthly. However, this option requires a 33% down payment of the total bill.
3. Apply for charity. Which I also did with the social worker and was told my social security benefit is too large.

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #13)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:57 PM

14. Our healthcare system is ridiculous.

I'm so sorry that you are faced with this.

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Response to yardwork (Reply #14)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 09:15 PM

15. Thanks. I have a sister who is 2nd year med student

She is coming home from school tomorrow to come up here and raise some hell. Hopefully, she can work some magic.

She worked for a clinic in Atlanta that works miracles, so if I can get out of this godforsaken hospital, I will transfer my records (sister will, anyway) to Good Samaritan and they can work some miracles for me.

Cross your fingers and hope!

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #15)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 09:18 PM

17. I will be hoping for you and sending good thoughts.

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #3)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:07 PM

5. Not familiar with condition, does this require surgery or prescription?

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Response to JaneyVee (Reply #5)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:14 PM

7. Prescription leads to current situation

The only way to stop it entirely is surgery to remove the thyroid. Even the iodine burn isn't 100% certain.

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #7)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:23 PM

9. You really do need 2014 to come quickly, you would then qualify for Medicaid. But,

Maybe this resource can help in the meantime: http://www.gfcn.org/facts.php

And a .pdf list/map: http://www.gfcn.org/media/PDFs/GFCN-ClinicMap2010.pdf

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Response to JaneyVee (Reply #9)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:28 PM

10. Can't get that page to load, but

I'm posting this from the hospital and their server isn't particularly good.

I''ll try it when I get home.

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Response to JaneyVee (Reply #5)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 08:43 PM

54. Hyper usually requires surgery eventually.

 

Hypo is the one that requires a prescription such as synthroid or levoxyl.

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:17 PM

8. ...

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 08:37 PM

11. My daughter had a thyroid storm at age 35 in July

It nearly killed her. She was in the hospital for 19 days and had to go back a month later to get the thyroid removed. Thank god she had insurance. There is no way she could have afforded it. Just the co-pays and such are kicking her butt now that she is finally back to work.
Removal is the way to go in my book. She had reactions to the other treatments and could not continue that route.

Let your doctors know about your situation and ask about hospital charity choices.

Good luck to you. I wish you well.

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Response to tnlurker (Reply #11)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 09:21 PM

19. Thank you and good wishes to your daughter!

It's horrible. If you get too warm, you feel like you're drowning. I simply can't breath. I have a home with 13 stairs I can't climb, so I live in one room and a bath on the main floor. I have a ranch home under contract that this hospital is going to cost me. They put this on my credit report and the deal is doomed.

I just need some time to straighten it out.

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 09:17 PM

16. Do you mind if I ask why you don't have ins. through your employer?

Does your employer not provide insurance? Or did you get laid off or something like that?

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #16)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 09:23 PM

20. I'm 60. I couldn't get a job if I was healthy.

No one hires seniors. No. One.

I owned my own business before I got too sick to run it.

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #20)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 09:29 PM

21. Did your prior insurance drop you? I'm just wondering....

how it is that people get to the point of being 60 without insurance and needing it while sick.

I'm 58, so I'm aware it can happen. If I lost my job, I'd have trouble buying ins. on my own. But you have to have it, or it's more difficult to get it, if you haven't been covered for a while. So I would try to get some minimal coverage, I guess.

So I was wondering if you haven't had ins. for many years, or if you had it recently and they dropped you, or what happened. If you had your own business, were you able to get ins. at that time?

In any case, the exchanges will be up in the next yr or two, and the subsidies along with them. Sounds like you will qualify for a subsidy. And Medicaid is supposed to be broadened under the ACA. Of course, that is if your state didn't opt out, like mine did (TX).

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #21)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 10:02 PM

23. What part of she lives on

I get $1309.00 per month do you not get?

Any kind of cheap plan has low limits or doesn't cover anything. It also is a pre-existing condition that would have been excluded in a rider

Millions of people do not have and cannot afford insurance. It usually is not a choice or their fault, which you seem to be implying. Companies don't hire older people -- or give them enough hours to have insurance -- because it is too expensive to carry them on the books because statistically, they will be most like to require the most and most expensive care.

"But you have to have it," <-- Yes, as this case illustrates. I reached a point at which my premiums were more than my mortgage and I still had to come up with money for co-pays and deductibles. Would it have made sense to give up my teeny house to keep my insurance?

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Response to nobodyspecial (Reply #23)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 11:59 PM

27. She owned her own business.

She presumably made more than $15K at that time. I assumed she had insurance then, or she would have worked for someone else who would provide insurance, like most do. (I basically work where I work for insurance , like a serf.)

Chill. I'm wondering about these cases I hear about, how it happens that various people end up with no insurance. Or is it a secret?

It's clear she can't afford it NOW. And even if she could, she has a pre-existing condition NOW. I'm not asking about the NOW. I'm asking about how it came to pass that she found herself in this situation.

Next time, take the time to actually READ the post you respond to.

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #27)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 02:32 AM

31. I owned my own business too.

I had insurance until it was priced way out of reach. That, by the way, is part of the reason that older people make less desirable employees. The actuarial charts literally price us out of the marketplace.

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Response to LiberalAndProud (Reply #31)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 08:19 PM

49. When you're an employee in a group policy situation, age doesn't matter.

The ins. cos. make a bid based on # of claims, amount of claims, # of employees, etc. Now that young women get birth control pill coverage, older women are more health-wise attractive, since the birth control pills add a lot of $ to the cost of hiring younger women. It may not sound like much, but it's every month, every year, year after year, multiplied by most of the young women working somewhere....it amounts to a lot of money.

I am 58. I changed jobs this year. I was afraid I wouldn't be able to get a new job, but I got two offers within a month. They weren't GREAT offers, but they were decent.

I'm hanging in there until Medicare kicks in for me....assuming the age eligibility won't be changed (grrrrrr).

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #49)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 08:41 PM

52. I suppose that depends on the size of the employee pool.

Small group insurance was our only option, and the actuarial tables didn't work in our favor as the years passed. I tend to disbelieve that larger companies aren't required to provide a census to their health insurance provider as we were. Admittedly, I have nothing to back that disbelief except my own cynicism.

On edit:

When I complained about the final, impossible rate increase I mentioned that our low claim rate. The answer: "They don't look at that. It's not a consideration." Find an actuary and talk to them. I think your perception of how group insurance works might be altered.

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Response to LiberalAndProud (Reply #52)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 09:08 PM

57. My employer was over 1,000 employees.

One year they explained to us in pretty good detail how the ins. co. bid process works. It was a year they had to change insurers because our insurer had raised the rates by 29%!

They present bids, based on # of claims, amount of claims, # of employees, etc., in the prior year. When you think about it, that is one good way to guesstimate what the claims for an employer will be in the current year, unless something big has happened (a big layoff or a big hiring spurt).

It may not work that way for small employer group policies. And it certainly isn't that way for individual policies.

My new employer has a few hundred employees. I don't think age matters with the ins. there, either. They have hired, in the last few years, a number of over-40 employees. And a few over-50 employees. The cost of ins. would be felt by my new, smaller employer even more keenly than my prior employer. If age mattered with the cost of that, I doubt they'd be hiring as many older workers as they are.

I will say that a sole proprietor told me that she needed a new receptionist, and the receptionist needed to be young because the ins. would cost too much for a "mature" receptionist. But then she said she got her ins. through her CPA husband's insurance, somehow. That doesn't make sense to me, so maybe she just wanted a young receptionist.

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #27)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 07:32 AM

34. The simple answer is I couldn't afford it

As I got older, the insurance was simply priced out of my reach.

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #34)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 08:22 PM

50. I see. Not blaming YOU...I was just wondering.

I hear about these sad situations, and I rarely hear the background of it. Since I'm getting older, I was just wondering how that happened to you. Partly so I can try to avoid that myself, and partly to understand how the health ins. field works for everyone.

It sucks that the entire ACA doesn't start in 2013, or you would qualify for that subsidy. Or Medicaid. (But I don't know if GA opted out.)

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #20)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 11:47 PM

26. Okay, I understand that your health does honestly keep you from working,

but I am getting very tired of hearing it said that not a single person over the age of 60 can get a job. I'm 64, and I have gotten several jobs since turning 60. They're not at a professional level, but at entry level for clerical or administrative assistant sort of thing. But really, companies do hire seniors. Yes. They. Do.

Oh, and I have a 70 year old friend who keeps on getting work.

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Response to SheilaT (Reply #26)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 02:26 AM

29. so cool to hear this! nt

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Response to SheilaT (Reply #26)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 07:33 AM

35. Let me clarify

Not in Georgia

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #35)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 01:41 PM

38. Really? You honestly think that not a single person over the age of 60 has been hired in Georgia

in the last year or so?

Look, I know that jobs at the professional level are increasingly difficult to get as you get older. That's nothing new. It's been the case for thirty years or so that I've been paying attention. But there are jobs. Older people really do get hired.

I cannot possibly be the only person in this country to have gotten work at this advanced age. And my friend is even older than I am. Wait. I am now remembering another friend who is my age who has gotten work in recent years. Gosh, I must know the only three people . . . .

I do sympathize with the lousy job situation out there. But I get so tired of the "No one over the age of 50 can possibly get a job" nonsense.

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Response to SheilaT (Reply #38)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 02:00 PM

39. I just don't have the energy to debate you

I'm sick, and I'm tired, and I just don't have the energy.

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #39)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 02:14 PM

40. ...




The best in others....some never see it

I'll answer for you:

Not every job market is the same. Here in many parts of the South, clerical jobs for women such as the previous poster described are very, very rare. There are so many applicants to these type positions, it is daunting.

Most jobs a 50+ woman can hope to get in this area are in food service, manufacturing or retail - part time, low wage, backbreaking work that sick people cannot and should not do.

It's nice to imagine all the happy sparkly wonderful jobs out there just going begging, but every place is not the same and millions of out of work people will tell this other poster that it IS hard in many places to get hired past a certain age.


I also have no insurance. I hope you can get this resolved - perhaps a teaching hospital like Emory could do something?

My heart goes out to you...hang in there




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Response to Tsiyu (Reply #40)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 03:35 PM

42. I am not claiming the jobs an older person can get are the best.

It's especially hard for an older person at a professional level to get a job. That I know. But people here act as if not a single person out of the 300 plus million in this country who is over the age of 50 or 60 has been hired in the last few years. Just not true.

To repeat. It's hard, but older people really do get hired.

Now I do fully sympathize with the OP. She has health issues that do keep her out of the workforce.

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Response to SheilaT (Reply #38)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 08:52 PM

55. What kind of jobs?

 

Do they have health benefits? I know highly qualified professionals who literally worked two jobs for decades. They worked in their profession at a corporation and also had a side business they ran. When they got laid off they continued their own business. The problem is that most companies today hire older professionals as contact workers. This is to avoid paying benefits and taxes.

In the meantime their benefits from their severance package has run out and if they work they can't qualify for things like Medicaid. So any money they make has to go towards out of pocket pay for healthcare.

A vicious cycle and why Obamacare should have been implemented sooner. Of course the members of congress who delayed its implementation have healthcare until they die.

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Response to SheilaT (Reply #26)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 08:40 AM

37. Most people over 40 have trouble finding work. As you age, it gets worse.

Some people are lucky. Most are not.

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 09:19 PM

18. I wish you the best

good vibes sent your way!!

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 09:50 PM

22. The medicaid eligibility doesn't look good, other than the possibility that Georgia will not

accept the increased eligibility because for a single person at $1309 per month (or $15,708) you will exceed the 130% x $11,170 or $14,521 which means we go to the subsidized exchange deal which I believe you may come out ok if you can hang on. I think your premiums will be down to about $800ish a year.

I'm not sure how the subsidy works, I don't know if you are expected to come up with the 500+ a month and get a credit.

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Response to TheKentuckian (Reply #22)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 10:05 PM

24. A little good news, the credit is refundable and can be advanced to the cartel

Now, we have to get you there and I don't know what to do for that off hand with a surgery needed.

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 11:28 PM

25. Hello Glitterati,

Just wanted to tell you that my family and I will keep you in our prayers. We know exactly what you are going through, my mom is a year into recovery from this condition. She gained over 200 lbs of water and was suffering from edema. We took her to the emergency room dec. 31st, actually brought in the new year there. Lol. They couldn't run very many test because of the swelling, they quickly started her on dialysis to get off some of the water. She had kidney, heart, and liver failure. She couldn't breathe because her lungs were filled with fluid. After about a month in they found out she was struggling with hyperthyroid. After removal, things were so much better. She just takes synthroid now, other than that she is fine. Just wanted to tell you, you are not alone and that it get better. I wish you had your cost covered already, makes things so much easier. My mom was insured under my father. The military has insurance called tricare, we just pay the co pays and premiums. I wish you had the same experience we did, the people at the military hospital were so kind and helpful. Did every test imaginable to find out what was going on. I'll be praying that you get the same treatment when your sister raises some hay.

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Response to satxdem (Reply #25)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 07:39 AM

36. Thanks, satxdem

Good wishes to you and yours. This disease is insidious and simply comes out of nowhere.

My lungs, too, are filled with fluid making breathing painful. Without the oxygen this morning, my pulse ox was 80.

I'm glad things went well for your Mom. Sending good wishes to you and yours.

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #36)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 02:22 PM

41. You've got a pulse ox of 80 with no O2?????

hell's bells.

but why aren't you out pounding the pavement to get one of those great jobs!?!?

You can wheel your O2 tank in there with you to the interview - that'll put you first in line of the three hundred people who also applied for that cush clerical job you can easily get!



please rest as much as you can to help you heal.

I hope someone can help you get the surgery you need

Georgia should be ashamed to treat its citizens this way.


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Response to Glitterati (Reply #36)

Wed Nov 28, 2012, 01:05 AM

58. so glad to see you recieved some good news.

It really is, a matter of 2 weeks and you find yourself in thyroid storm. My mom had no previous medical problems so you are completely right about how insidious it is. Removing the fluid is really the toughest part. They eventually were able to move it around with the dialysis, she was on the breathing machine for about a week just to help. She said it felt like she was drowning. Same pulse issues. Things are much better, thank you for your good wishes. Sending them back your way. Now that you are going to Good Samaritan, I hope that you get the good care you deserve. Best of luck to you.

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 01:02 AM

28. In October you will be able to enroll for health insurance

or expanded Medicaid to begin in January 2014 . Your state may choose to not participate in the Medicaid expansion so that might be a problem for you. It appears from this calculator that you will qualify for significant subsidy for a silver-level plan in the exchange, and your estimated annual insurance premium would be $492 ($41/month). Here is a subsidy calculator: http://healthreform.kff.org/subsidycalculator.aspx Of course there will be a deductible/copays. Still, you can't beat $41/month for a fairly comprehensive insurance plan.

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Response to Roselma (Reply #28)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 02:27 AM

30. if your state doesn't participate

in the Medicaid expansion--I would move to one that does. It is that important.

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Response to brokechris (Reply #30)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 07:30 AM

33. I may have to

If I want to live.

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Response to Roselma (Reply #28)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 07:29 AM

32. Thank you, Roselma

that's definitely good news.

Of course, my Republican Governor, former Congressman Nathan Deal, isn't going to participate in the health care exchanges, so I doubt the Medicare expansion is on his ToDo list either.

$41/mo would be heaven! Oh how I pray Deal can give up his pride for just one life.

Sorry I didn't respond earlier. I took a sleeping pill at the hospital because I haven't slept in days. Got some much needed rest.

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #32)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 07:41 PM

48. If your governor will not participate in providing an exchange, no problem for you.

The federal government will be setting up an exchange for your state. Unless your income would be considered under 133% of the federal poverty level, you would go into either a state or federal exchange, and it appears that your income will slightly exceed the federal poverty level, so you will not be affected by lack of Medicaid expansion in your state. Sending you positive vibes and cyber ((hugs)). Keep the faith, enroll next October, and get that much-needed health plan. A coordinated health plan by a good physician can greatly improve your health.

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 05:57 PM

43. It appears that every medical professional at the hospital knows of or worked at Good Sam

So, thanks to my daughter's magic, I have been released from the hospital to go to an appointment at Good Samaritan tomorrow afternoon. Not only are they amazing doctors, they know of and use all the available resources to get medical care to the underserved.

But, it is actually funny, because every doctor, nurse and social worker at the hospital did a stint at Good Sam during medical school.

Nice to be home and looking forward to putting myself in the care of the doctors at Good Sam tomorrow.

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Response to Glitterati (Reply #43)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 06:00 PM

45. This is a piece of good news.

I do so hope you get the treatment you need quickly. Wishing you the best luck and a swift return to better health.

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 06:00 PM

44. $1300/month isn't very much

 

Have you considered seeking employment?

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Response to TrueBlueinCO (Reply #44)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 06:02 PM

46. Perhaps you should consider reading the thread

or a literacy course, whichever applies.

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Response to LiberalAndProud (Reply #46)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 06:30 PM

47. I read it. What's your point?

 

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 08:31 PM

51. An option could be move to a state like VT where they are starting a single payer plan or

 

how about MA. It is something to think about.

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 08:41 PM

53. Just curious if you have contacted any groups like this

 

http://www.thyroid.org/about-american-thyroid-association/contact-ata/


Sometimes these associations have information they don't give out to the general public. Maybe this association or another can put you in contact with doctors or a hospital willing to work with you. Also contact the office of your governor. I know this sounds weird but some states have catastrophic health services for people who don't qualify for social programs but have limited income. I am just throwing out a few suggestions and hope you get help soon.

I have the opposite and I am hypothyroid. It's why I exercise everyday . I have been more focused on the MS and received a lot of information through the MS Society. They were the ones that put me in contact with the company that manufactures the MS therapy medication I use. They actually pay the copay up to a certain limit for those using their medicine.

Wishing you the best.

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Response to Glitterati (Original post)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 08:56 PM

56. I am so angry that people like Glitterati need healthcare and

 

are refused. I am from Britain and find it shameful that this is supposed to be the wealthiest nation on the planet and millions do not have healthcare. My in-laws, who have cost a fortune in self-inflicted illnesses, think there is nothing wrong with the system and refuse to accept anyone is ever refused healthcare. What the hell is wrong with America? America spends vastly more money on healthcare, but tens of millions don't even have healthcare. That makes no sense. Thank God for Obama. And to those who have turned healthcare into a political battle, they should all be ashamed of themselves.

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