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Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:58 PM

Speaking of Republicans (and decency)...

Last edited Sat Nov 24, 2012, 09:10 PM - Edit history (4)

Yes, it is interesting to be reminded that one of the most economically conservative and saber-rattling Republicans of the 20th century would be a pariah in the 21st century GOP.

But, as long as we're talking about Republicans and decency in the same breath, how about a mention of 2 former Republicans (one a President and one a Senator, one from the early 20th century & one from the 21st), both of whom ACTUALLY LEFT the Republican Party.





After Theodore Roosevelt DISMANTLED the Northern Security railroad trust in 1904, he eventually developed irreconcilable differences with the right wing of the Republican Party, left the GOP and ran as the candidate for the Progressive/Bull Moose Party in 1912.



From the 1912 platform of the Progressive Party on which former Republican president Theodore Roosevelt ran:

"Political parties exist to secure responsible government and to execute the will of the people.

"From these great tasks both of the old parties have turned aside. Instead of instruments to promote the general welfare, they have become the tools of corrupt interests which use them impartially to serve their selfish purposes. Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people.


"To destroy this invisible government, to dissolve the unholy alliance between corrupt business and corrupt politics is the first task of the statesmanship of the day."









And from Former Senator Lincoln Chafee's speech at the DNC in September, in which he dealt with the matter of labels:




As a former Republican, I represent a group of Americans who all too often have no one to speak for them.

This group doesn't necessarily have a name.

We've been called "moderates," but that term can be misleading.

There is nothing moderate
about our love of country or our passion for America's future.

There is nothing moderate about our desire to work together within the broad political center in which most Americans live.

No matter what you call us though, this is certain:

There are a lot of us all over the country, and in November we will once again help elect Barack Obama President of the United States.

We are, at our core, conservatives, in the best sense of the word.

Thoughtful, responsible with public resources, and respectful of personal freedom.

And we are liberal, in the best sense of the word.

We believe that government can and should be an instrument for the greater good.

And although my former party has hijacked the term, there is really nothing conservative about today's Republican Party.

In fact, there is no room there for traditional conservatives like us.


But I am proud to say that in my friend President Barack Obama we have found a champion for the principles we hold dear . . . .








(full transcript at:
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0912/80744.html )






So, if we're going to talk Republicans and decency, and if former Republicans count, I'll nominate Theodore Roosevelt and Lincoln Chafee.

While TR may have been a big stick imperialist, but he was pretty damn good at taking on the 1%.




Other nominations?














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Arrow 31 replies Author Time Post
Reply Speaking of Republicans (and decency)... (Original post)
Faryn Balyncd Nov 2012 OP
dae Nov 2012 #1
Faryn Balyncd Nov 2012 #2
pnwmom Nov 2012 #3
zbdent Nov 2012 #4
Omaha Steve Nov 2012 #5
tavalon Nov 2012 #6
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #7
Warpy Nov 2012 #8
Freddie Nov 2012 #9
Stargleamer Nov 2012 #10
Faryn Balyncd Nov 2012 #20
prairierose Nov 2012 #11
ProudProgressiveNow Nov 2012 #12
blue neen Nov 2012 #13
ErikJ Nov 2012 #14
cali Nov 2012 #15
ReRe Nov 2012 #16
GatorOrange Nov 2012 #17
madinmaryland Nov 2012 #18
Tigress DEM Nov 2012 #19
AAO Nov 2012 #21
Raine Nov 2012 #22
Brigid Nov 2012 #23
GoCubsGo Nov 2012 #31
southernyankeebelle Nov 2012 #24
mountain grammy Nov 2012 #25
Zorra Nov 2012 #26
Faryn Balyncd Nov 2012 #27
Zorra Nov 2012 #28
Faryn Balyncd Nov 2012 #30
femrap Nov 2012 #29

Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 08:37 PM

1. Republicans & Decency like Oil & Water

do not mix.

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Response to dae (Reply #1)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 08:46 PM

2. Think that accounts for the exodus?






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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 09:12 PM

3. I remember east coast Republicans

such as John Lindsay, mayor of NY; Nelson Rockefeller, Gov. of NY;
and Millicent Fenwick, Congresswoman of NJ. By today's standards
they'd all be flaming liberals.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 09:48 PM

4. in the same sentence?

who was saying such blasphemy?

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 09:54 PM

5. Great post


K&R!

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 10:16 PM

6. I like Lincoln Chafee and was proud of him for refusing to be cowed by his insane party

It's good to see leaving didn't ruin his career.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 10:26 PM

7. Great post. Chafee is a man of principle. Also, I believe Teddy Roosevelt...

was responsible for starting the national park system, and so setting aside a lot of acreage to be preserved. He was an environmentalist before it was cool. Can you image how much concrete we'd have from coast to coast if we didn't have parks setting aside some greenery and pristine areas (to the extent that anything is pristine these days).

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 10:38 PM

8. The only one I ever voted for was Ed Brooke in 1972

He was first elected in 1966 and was the first popularly elected black Senator until sometime in the 90s. He was a fighter against discrimination, not only against people of color, but against all forms including sex discrimination. He was the best of the liberal Republicans I've seen in my lifetime.

Just before his re-election campaign in 1978, he and his wife went through an incredibly ugly divorce with charges and counter charges being flung about in the press. That plus the fact that he was running against a liberal Democratic powerhouse named Paul Tsongas combined to defeat him.

Both my ex and I admitted to each other that the vote in 1978 presented a very difficult choice. If there had been any way to retain Brooke in public life, I think we both would have.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 10:40 PM

9. Arlen Specter

Mixed reviews. He was pretty vile in the Anita Hill/Clarence Thomas hearings IIRC. But he was pro-choice and basically a moderate who, in the end, said that "the party left me". For his brief time as a Democratic Senator he was a reliable vote for our side.
He was originally a Democrat anyway who only joined the Republican Party in order to run for DA of Philadelphia many years ago. He was generally well liked here in PA. He passed away recently and may he rest in peace.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 10:59 PM

10. Elmer Andersen (Governor of Minnesota) and Pete McCloskey

Elmer Andersen (former Republican Governor of Minnesota) criticized the Bush administration for spewing "outright untruths with evangelistic furvor" and called the man pulling the strings (Cheney) an evil man.

McCloskey opposed the Vietnam War and called for Nixon's impeachment.

Possibly George Aiken too.

How about Earl Warren? No, I can't fully say he was decent, because he supported the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II, but I do think he did later regret his support.

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Response to Stargleamer (Reply #10)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:08 AM

20. McCloskey was the first Congressman to call for Nixon's impeachment,for repeal of the Gulf of Tonkin



...resolution. He was elected to Congress in 1967 as an antiwar Republican, challenged Nixon in the 1972 primaries as a peace candidate, opposed the Iraq war, supported John Kerry in 1972, and changed his affiliation to Democratic in 2007, stating, "I finally concluded that it was fraud for me to remain a member of this modern Republican Party".

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 10:59 PM

11. Good post...I find it interesting ...

that in the 60's the moderates in the repub party shut the rw (Koch/John Bircher) crazies up and pushed them to the edge. Today, the moderates are leaving the R party to become independents or Dems.

Lincoln Chaffee certainly has been a man of principle and TR did fight the 1%. I wish we had TR or FDR to fight for us today.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 11:05 PM

12. K&R nt

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 11:12 PM

13. No, thank you.

It's irrelevant.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 11:34 PM

14. Governor Tom McCall-environmental champion

Last edited Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:25 AM - Edit history (1)

Republican Tom McCall was one of the nation's most environmental active politicians. He enacted the country's first land use bills to control sprawl using the Urban Growth Boundary around every town and city in Oregon which was revolutionary, and the country's 1st bottle bill and many more.

Governor Tom McCall
(1967-1975)

Thomas Lawson McCall, Governor of Oregon from 1967-1975, was Oregon's thirtieth governor. McCall was born in Egypt, Massachusetts on March 22, 1913, the son of Henry McCall and Dorothy Lawson McCall.
.........................................

In 1964 McCall ran for Secretary of State as a stepping-stone to the governorship. He defeated Alfred Corbett, a victory which ran counter to the trend of Republican defeats in the 1964 elections. In 1966 he decided to run for governor, and found he was opposed by his own party. Nevertheless, he ran on the issue of "livability" and defeated Robert Straub in the general election in November 1966. His first major political victory came with legislation known as the "Beach Bill," which granted the state government the power to zone Oregon's beaches, thus protecting them from private development. McCall was known for being more publicly accessible than many of his predecessors as governor. He held open houses and enjoyed making public appearances. His independence resulted in poor relations with his own party. However, his accessibility endeared him to the media, which supported him in glowing terms.

In 1969, his belief in the control of development led to a proposal for land-use planning. McCall wanted to broaden Oregon's industrial base, but at the same time insisted on conserving the environment. His proposed legislation, Senate Bill 10, required local governments to complete comprehensive zoning plans within two years. Perhaps the most famous environmental legislation enacted under McCall was House Bill 1036, the "Bottle Bill," which was the nation's first mandatory bottle-deposit law and was designed to decrease litter in Oregon. The bill was enacted in 1971.

In 1970 the U.S. Army proposed to store deadly nerve gas agents at Umatilla Depot. Initially McCall acquiesced, but then changed his mind and publicly defied the Nixon administration on the issue. Ultimately the nerve agents were not stored in Oregon. Also in 1970 McCall approved the "Vortex I" rock concert at McIver State Park as a way to divert potential anti-war protestors from rioting during the national American Legion convention in Portland. It was a unique state-supervised event that drew 35,000 participants over several days. Although the danger of rioting was probably minimal, the move nevertheless helped to cement McCall's re-election victory over Robert Straub.

Despite his notoriety as an environmentalist, McCall did side with economic concerns on certain issues, such as timber harvesting (he opposed restrictions on private industry) and nuclear power (he supported the Trojan nuclear facility). With regard to labor concerns, McCall vetoed legislation designed to organize migrant farm workers. In 1973 land-use planning again became a major issue, and Senate Bill 100 from that session was designed to provide state control over land-use decisions. Although the final bill did not go as far as McCall originally intended, a compromise bill forged by L.B. Day, McCall's head of the Department of Environmental Quality, created the Land Conservation and Development Commission.

In 1973 McCall developed a plan for tax reform which included an increase in the income tax and a freeze on property taxes, with the goal to shift funding for schools away from property taxes and toward the income of the wealthy. He encountered fierce opposition to the plan, and relied on his personal popularity to carry it to victory at the polls. However, the proposal failed with the voters.

..........................

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:03 AM

15. Jim Jeffords left the repub party before Chafee and changed the balance

of power in the Senate when he did so and his record is more liberal than Chafee's.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:04 AM

16. Not off the top of my head, buuuuuttttttt...

... it did give me a nice idea, or dream, or wish.... Are there any kind-of-moderate Republicons' who could be convinced to jump over to our side? Since the Republicon' Party won't let them vote the way they want to without getting tossed in the ditch next election by the Koch Bros and their pals in ALEC? At least one or two?

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:18 AM

17. Great Post, Two Fine Examples. Some more under the radar types...

Bob Michel: Eviscerated by Limbaugh and others on the right for being a RINO, but a guy willing to reach across the aisle to get things done. Would have made a far better Speaker than Newt and a lot of the gridlock in the mid 90's would have been avoided.

La Guardia and John Lindsay: Two NYC mayors make it: Lindsay actually switched over to the Democratic side at the end, but still a good example of a decent Republican that was taken out by the right. La Guardia bought into the New Deal and had good relations with FDR.

John Chafee: Your examples father: gave a damn about improving healthcare access to the lower class and better gun control. Voted against the impeachment of Big Dog too.

It's really hard to come up with much more than this...Ask a Freeper this question in the opposite direction and you'll get Scoop Jackson or Stennis.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:25 AM

18. Lowell Weicker.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:06 AM

19. An ongoing blog like this would be helpful for both sides of the isle. Too much is polarized.

But I'm thinking a lot about the average folk - those who question the level of crazy in the rethug party and want no part of it AND on the other side, people who despite all the prompting by FAUX Knews to look at Liberals as Godless and irresponsible welfare folk actually see us in a positive light once in awhile.

I think of Dennis Kuchinich's idea about a Department of Peace and how it could be useful here at home in America using principles of diplomacy negotiate a cease fire between our parties - at least among the actual voters.

I can see many Republicans who actually CARE about their spiritual beliefs voting for DEMs when their side presents a bat shit crazy candidate once we get the conversations going to present the facts and once the FAUX News channel is completely discredited.

I'm thinking about 2% to start. People who aren't hateful by nature, but have been bombarded by fear mongering tactics non-stop since the *ush years. People who really WANT to make the best choice but have been misled.

My husband's Aunt stayed home this year and didn't vote or quietly voted Obama. My BIL has been outspoken and strident, but he's conceded a few discussions because of wrong information on his part. He works for the Post Office but seems to think the mismanagemet he sees IS the reason they have fiscal problems.

But I think more patient conversations and less watching FAUX for them will produce less bat shit crazy rhetoric and possibly some real serious disagreements, but that I can respect. If someone's opinion about the facts are different than mine, OK, but the facts have to be acknowledged as such.

Thanks for this thread!!!

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:11 AM

21. Honest Abe Lincoln

 

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 04:21 AM

22. Those are very good role models that should give courage and

backbone to those others of their party to put their country first over their political party.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 06:27 AM

23. What, nobody has named Eisenhower yet?

It is true that he did not leave the Republican Party, but that's because he didn't have to--the party was not the insane asylum it is now. He would be absolutely horrified to see the state of the party today.

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Response to Brigid (Reply #23)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 04:01 PM

31. I think this is in response to a post about Barry Goldwater being the "last decent republcian".

Goldwater, as we know, came after Eisenhower. I am really surprised at all the "recs" that post got. There was not much that was "decent" about Goldwater. I guess by current GOP standards, he may appear that way. But, it only serves to show just how extreme the party is now. About the only difference between him and the current GOP is his stance on some social issues. For everything else, he was just as extreme as the current crop.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 09:00 AM

24. Yes, indeed many good republicans and it's to bad we need more of them. Yet the

 

tea party still think they need to get the moderates out of their party in 2014. There are no moderates left in their party. All they have is right and extreme right. I think if the dems do what they need to do in the mid election by showing up we can beat them. But it is a must.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 09:54 AM

25. Like I've been saying since 2008

President Obama is a moderate Republican... As a true lefty, I had a hard time with this, but will always suck it up and vote for the best candidate for the country. In 2008 and 2012, that candidate was Barack Obama. We must reject extremists at all costs.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 10:32 AM

26. Fine. Just vote for Democrats and keep your conservative ideas and policies away from our

party and our government.

We don't need any more regressive conservative ideas stagnating and stifling the progress and evolution of our party or our country.

Enough is enough.

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Response to Zorra (Reply #26)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 11:08 AM

27. Did you read the post?

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Reply #27)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:12 PM

28. Yes. No one with who really has their shit together would ever have anything to do with

the republican party.

So I think it's really great for folks to wake up and grow a heart, and leave the evil of the republican party behind. But when they bring their residual conservative ideas into the Democratic Party, because they are not very evolved in the progressive sense, they often seek to change the party to fit their lingering conservatism, thus moving the party further to the right.

I would prefer it if they would just back and observe in silence, until they learn what being progressive really is. A progressive consciousness and understanding does not evolve overnight.

Since 1960, I have seen republicans, and conservatives, do little else but cause harm.

Yes, I'm glad when former republicans become Democrats, and vote Democratic. But I don't want them trying to move the party to the right in their ignorance.

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Response to Zorra (Reply #28)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 03:49 PM

30. Do you see "lingering conservatism" in David Brock and Cenk Uygur?

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Original post)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:42 PM

29. Going back to the days of

 

Watergate, there were a number of 'normal' people who belonged to the republican party.

In order to get votes, those 'normal' republicans welcomed the religious fanatics. The zealots were great at organizing on the grassroots level. They worked like drones for the Queen Bee. Now the republicans cannot get rid of them. I believe some of the fanatics saw how they were being used in this past Election.

Rove used them during the W years. The Corporate Rich Boyz used them after Citizens United. ALEC uses them on the State level to oppress the working people and women.

During this past election, I heard from many that George Romney was a decent man...of course he lived during the times of 'normal' people being republicans.

Religion and Politics just do not mix. When those TV ministers started thumping the Bible for money and inclusion in politics, I knew we were in for one hell of a bumpy ride.

And I agree that Lincoln Chafee is a decent person. He even wants women to enjoy Freedom.

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