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Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:16 PM

Remember Which Early 60's Movie Larry Hagman Starred Opposite Henry Fonda ???

I hate that the news has his career starting out with 'I Dream of Jeannie.'



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Reply Remember Which Early 60's Movie Larry Hagman Starred Opposite Henry Fonda ??? (Original post)
WillyT Nov 2012 OP
Tx4obama Nov 2012 #1
WillyT Nov 2012 #2
longship Nov 2012 #3
CTyankee Nov 2012 #4
WillyT Nov 2012 #5
CTyankee Nov 2012 #6
longship Nov 2012 #10
John1956PA Nov 2012 #12
longship Nov 2012 #13
John1956PA Nov 2012 #14
htuttle Nov 2012 #7
OldDem2012 Nov 2012 #8
John1956PA Nov 2012 #9
Blue_Tires Nov 2012 #11
longship Nov 2012 #15
WillyT Nov 2012 #16
longship Nov 2012 #19
kentauros Nov 2012 #17
hrmjustin Nov 2012 #18

Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:23 PM

1. He acted in over a dozen before Fail Safe...


I remember him most from I Dream of Jeanie and Dallas, and probably the majority of folks do too - that's why those two shows have been mentioned the most.

Here's a full list here: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001306/

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Response to Tx4obama (Reply #1)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:27 PM

2. Forgot That He Was In 'In Harm's Way'...

Thanks for the list.


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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:28 PM

3. Fail Safe!

Hagman had a major role, as the President's Russian interpreter. It was a great, and very scary movie with a horrific ending that saves the planet.

A morality play. Prominent also were many recognizable actors. Walter Matthau as a think tank nuke weapons hawk. Even Dom Deloise manages to put in a rare, and very early, dramatic part. Wonderfully acted with appropriately claustiphobic staging.

It is a morality tale at a time just after the world came to the edge of global nuclear war, thankfully avoided by JFK's and RFK's steady hands.

Well worth a viewing. And Hagman is very good.

I recommend it highly.

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Response to longship (Reply #3)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:33 PM

4. what was the Dom Delouise part? I don't remember that at all...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #4)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:47 PM

5. Here Ya Go...




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Response to WillyT (Reply #5)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:51 PM

6. wow, thanks. what a great little vignette...dom was wonderful...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #4)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 08:04 PM

10. He is the officer at SAC Hdqtrs...

who tells the Soviets how to defeat the US bomber counter-measures. This, after other officers broke down. It's a bit part, nearly his only line in the movie. He plays the part well, clearly scared shitless, as would anybody in that role. It's a very powerful scene.

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Response to longship (Reply #10)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 08:23 PM

12. At the end of the scene, Dom's character returns to his station.

As I recall, he is shown at a distance, sitting in his chair, with an expression of overwhelming guilt for having told the Soviets how to destroy the U.S.A.F. bombers.

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Response to John1956PA (Reply #12)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 08:26 PM

13. Video posted earlier in the thread.

Watch it. His voice wavers as he realizes that he's committing treason to save the world -- a true cognitive dissonance. It is a very powerful scene and Dom pulls it off beautifully.

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Response to longship (Reply #13)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 08:47 PM

14. Yes. The scene is just as I remember it.

You are correct about Dom's terrific acting. Your description of the situation which the Sergeant finds himself in as one of cognitive dissonance is insightful.

When Dom died in 2009, I posted an entry in a blog which I had been keeping at that time, and I noted his performance in Fail-Safe.

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:54 PM

7. "The matador....is me...."

Gotta admit, the matador thread in the movie threw me at first. Really hit home on second watching (sometimes I'm slow...).

The frequent silence in the movie (emphasized by the lack of soundtrack music) is incredibly effective. Hagman played the part of an youngish interpreter thrown into nightmare situation perfectly. His chemistry with Fonda couldn't have been better.

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:55 PM

8. That was an excellent movie! Highly recommended for anyone who hasn't seen it! nt.

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 08:04 PM

9. Here is a still from "Fail-Safe" which I posted this afternoon.



The above still of Larry Hagman is from the following scene.

http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/video/429673/Fail-Safe-Movie-Clip-Who-Gives-That-Order-.html

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 08:12 PM

11. Failsafe is tragically underrated

Since it was released so close to its much more famous counterpart dr. Strangelove...Both were based on the same basic source material, iirc. While Kubrick was originally assigned to play the story serious, he thought it too absurd and made it a satire instead...

Although campy in some parts, Failsafe survives on the power of its acting performances, (especially fonda and matthau) which measure up every bit to strangelove's, along with good pacing and an ending bound to spark endless debate among audiences...

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Response to Blue_Tires (Reply #11)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 08:57 PM

15. Literary bases.

Dr. Strangelove was based on a 1958 pulp novel by Peter George (aka, Peter Bryant) entitled Red Alert. I read it in when I was in Jr. High, probably shortly after the Cuban missile crisis which scared the shit out of everybody.

Here's the Wiki entry:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Alert_(novel)

Fail-Safe was based on the 1962 novel by Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler of the same name.

Here's the Wiki entry:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fail-safe

I read both novels before I saw either films, which were released within a year of each other.

Both films and novels were part of the culture of the day. We actually did those duck and cover drills in elementary school in the fifties in Detroit. October, 1962 was the most frightening experience I ever witnessed.

I was delivering the Detroit News daily for years, and on only two occasions made the afternoon edition late. The first was Cuban missiles. The second was Kennedy's assassination. Us delivery boys were scared shitless on both occasions. But we got the news to our customers just the same.

Both these movies, and their literary sources were a part of everybody's lives. Not as stories, but real shit. That's why culture picked up on it and told these compelling, and profoundly scary scenarios.

It seemed real at the time because it was real.

Another, more recent source, is Thirteen Days a good telling of the Cuban missile crisis. It is a fairly accurate retelling, and includes info from the former Soviet Union after it collapsed. In spite of our fears at the time, nobody knew how close we came to nuclear war.

Thanks for the post.

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Response to longship (Reply #15)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 09:27 PM

16. Great Info, longship !!!

I had seen both movies, and assumed 'Strangelove' was based on 'Fail Safe'.

I read the novel Fail Safe one family reunion in Wisconsin in the late 70's/early 80's...

And what a read... as usual, better than the movie.

But I have never heard of 'Red Alert'... will have to check it out.

Thanks.


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Response to WillyT (Reply #16)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 10:23 PM

19. "Red Alert" was pulp fiction.

I do not know if it's still in print. Haven't looked. I suspect not.

If you find a source, PM me. And I will do the same for you. I suspect it will be a difficult search, although I confess I haven't even googled it.

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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 10:19 PM

17. Yes, and I also remember him in Blake Edwards' "S.O.B."



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Response to WillyT (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 10:23 PM

18. great movie!

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