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Sat Nov 24, 2012, 04:02 PM

LSD: The Trigger of Drugs Larry Hagman's near-death experience

The perspective that famous actor Larry Hagman has on life is the polar opposite from that of his famous character, J.R. Ewing, on the popular, long-running Dallas television series. He sums it up at the end of his recent autobiography, Hello Darlin' when he states that: "The only answer is love." Although he credits his solid marriage and his family for helping shape his love-centered worldview, he also believes that he has been positively transformed into a more compassionate, loving human being by his ...

Actually, there had been two experiences in his opinion, as his serious experiment with LSD in the sixties had produced a psychic journey remarkably similar to his later medical NDE...

LSD had been recommended to him and he finally decided to try it. Well aware of the potential hazards of such a powerful drug and treating it quite seriously, he took it under the best controlled conditions he could arrange. Under the guidance of a friend with LSD experience, in the comfortable and secure environment of his home, and wearing a hooded monk-like robe made by his wife, Larry began his LSD adventure. The trip began with a strong buzz just below his navel (the basal area of the kundalini energy of yoga). He was reminded of the term vibrations, which he had often heard used by his friends who had become part of the higher consciousness crowd. Never really knowing what they were referring to, he suddenly thought he experientially understood - they were happening to him! Then the visions began.

The entrance to a cave appeared across the room from him, guarded by two octopus-like creatures accompanied by two entities that looked like feathery lions (reminding me of mythological Griffins, who are sometimes described as guardians of treasure). Turning his head, he saw his grandmother - who had died when he was a child - hovering above him with a wonderful, comforting smile on her face. She assured him that it was all quite natural. He was at the gate of all new experiences and, despite the guards, he need not worry. Her advice was: if pulled, don't resist and if pushed, don't fight it; go with the flow (a dictum very much like the essential principle of the Chinese art of Tai Ji). Then a deep understanding dawned on him. Larry had been attending lectures and reading The Tibetan Book of the Dead and books about Eastern mysticism. Their meaning had eluded him, but now he felt that he could finally grasp it. It was all basically summed up in what his Grandma had told him. The constrictive ego could be put aside and the unitive flow of life embraced.

The interview with his Grandmother ended and the cave claimed his attention. Moving toward it and reaching its entrance, he was sucked inside and rocketed down a tunnel, at the end of which was a light. He emerged into a place of bright and diffused light where he saw a person of indeterminate sex who called out to him without speaking. In typical out-of-body and near-death fashion, the communication seemed to be telepathic, as the being informed him that:

"This is a glimpse of where you've been, where you're going, where you are all the time."

Continued: http://near-death.com/experiences/triggers04.html



Larry had another NDE during his liver transplant surgery. Safe Passage Fellow Traveler of the Cosmos!




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Arrow 19 replies Author Time Post
Reply LSD: The Trigger of Drugs Larry Hagman's near-death experience (Original post)
MagickMuffin Nov 2012 OP
Zorra Nov 2012 #1
MagickMuffin Nov 2012 #2
bluedave Nov 2012 #3
OriginalGeek Nov 2012 #4
kentauros Nov 2012 #10
MagickMuffin Nov 2012 #18
kentauros Nov 2012 #19
BlancheSplanchnik Nov 2012 #5
MagickMuffin Nov 2012 #16
dangin Nov 2012 #6
roguevalley Nov 2012 #9
chuckstevens Nov 2012 #7
xtraxritical Nov 2012 #8
Bongo Prophet Nov 2012 #12
MagickMuffin Nov 2012 #17
BlueMan Votes Nov 2012 #13
MagickMuffin Nov 2012 #14
arikara Nov 2012 #11
MagickMuffin Nov 2012 #15

Response to MagickMuffin (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 04:17 PM

1. Sounds like Larry was a really interesting guy. nt

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Response to Zorra (Reply #1)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 05:38 PM

2. Yes he was certainly interesting to say the least.

However, I never watched Dallas, even being a resident of Fort Worth. I just never really got into the nighttime soap opera drama-rama. However, I was a huge fan of I Dream of Jeannie!

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Response to MagickMuffin (Reply #2)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 05:48 PM

3. especially Jeannie

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Response to MagickMuffin (Reply #2)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 05:56 PM

4. Heh, I grew up in Dallas

during the original run of Dallas and never watched until after I moved to Florida and caught it in re-runs. We've been enjoying the rebirth of the series recently and will miss Larry.

And double hell yeah re: Jeannie.

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Response to MagickMuffin (Reply #2)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 09:56 PM

10. Being a resident of Houston, I never watched Dallas



Yet I was also (and still am) a big fan of I Dream of Jeannie


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Response to kentauros (Reply #10)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 02:01 AM

18. Same here kentauros

I loved Loved LOVED that show

I suppose that could be why you love belly dancers so much!



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Response to MagickMuffin (Reply #18)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 02:10 AM

19. Well, I do have a post about that on my blog...

I credit that show as well as the old Tales of the Arabian Nights with my interest in Middle Eastern culture

Here's a Jeannie-blink smilie:

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Response to MagickMuffin (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 06:11 PM

5. I had no idea he was so cool!

I never watched Dallas. Oh well.

Safe travels!

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Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #5)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:28 AM

16. The sixties were definitely a kewl time.

Although, I was still a child, but that doesn't negate the fact that the sixties were truly a Magickal time!

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Response to MagickMuffin (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 06:29 PM

6. That neuro surgeon...

In the recent Newsweek with all his heaven talk. That dude needs to take some shrooms and/or nitrous. Same experience. The brain goes some amazing places with a bit of help.

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Response to dangin (Reply #6)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:03 PM

9. actually he had his experiences brain dead from a disease

with a 4% survival rate. There are those who have NDEs and those who haven't in this world. I had one. I wish it on everyone. it was glorious. Go in peace, JR. You were a good man.

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Response to MagickMuffin (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 06:40 PM

7. Roger Healy's Trip

I wonder if in actor Bill Daley's trip he was on an iceberg with a Penguin at the South Pole because Jennie blinked him there to prevent him from telling Major Nelson about her crazy scheme. Sorry, I watched way too many reruns in the 1970's!

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Response to MagickMuffin (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 06:53 PM

8. I took plenty of LSD so what?

 

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Response to xtraxritical (Reply #8)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 12:55 AM

12. So what? So, you were likely doing it wrong.

Set and setting are very important aspects in the psychedelic experience. Setting being your physical environment, and "set" being the mindset that you bring to the session. I would guess from your response that your mindset is where you still have some work to do.

Imagine someone saying they had a revelatory experience at, say, the grand canyon or the Sistene chapel. Your response is "I've been there plenty of times. So what?"

Or a friend mentions how moved by some novel or the birth of a child, and you think to yourself, "So what, I've had kids and read novels too. Hmmph. No big deal." (Hopefully you have the class not to say these things out loud to a friend...only on public forums, with anonymity to hide behind.)

In my years of experience, it is usually dull minds that have dull trips. Occasionally, a person may break that syndrome, and I hope you have that chance some day. Until then, don't be that xtraxritical of others' experiences.

Good luck.

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Response to Bongo Prophet (Reply #12)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:58 AM

17. I suppose you earned the name Bongo Prophet for your incredible insight.

Well stated. When such a response as "so what" with nothing to back up their claim kinda makes one wonder why they would take the time to repsond at all.

Thank you for your powerful insight and wisdom. As someone who knows about set and setting and your mindset while tripping plays a very important and powerful role.

Bravo!


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Response to xtraxritical (Reply #8)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:10 AM

13. same here.

 

and i never saw anything that wasn't there.

we used to get fresh windowpane thru a friend whose boyfriend was a ph.d. grad student in organic chemistry-he made it and used the proceeds to pay for school.

however- i think i enjoyed the mescaline experience the best when it came to hallucinogenics...

but i still didn't see anything that wasn't there.

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Response to xtraxritical (Reply #8)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:22 AM

14. As have I and I've had numerous Mystical Experiences

I'm sorry that you never seemed to have that kind of experience. Or you would have replied with a more profound statement than "so what", kinda gives me the impression you were never in it to learn about yourself, the inner workings of universal consciousness.

So what indeed!





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Response to MagickMuffin (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 11:43 PM

11. Such an interesting article

"Everyone has their own unique song, an inner melody that fuses each of us to the deep, modulating, harmonious hum of the celestial orchestra that's the collective energy of everything that's ever lived and ever going to live. It's our life force. The power of the universe."

I had an NDE once and it was wonderful. It left me with no fear of death, in fact I will welcome it when my time comes.

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Response to arikara (Reply #11)

Sun Nov 25, 2012, 01:24 AM

15. I've never experienced an NDE but I have experienced

Universal Consciousness and a host of other Mystical Experiences while tripping.

And the above quote explains it all so clearly!

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