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Sat Nov 24, 2012, 04:40 AM

 

New Jersey wants to make a tourist attraction out of Seaside Heights Roller Coaster that is in ocean



do you know, that during Hurricane Sandy, the historical roller coaster ended up in the ocean, like it was a scene from a movie (like the Statue of Liberty in the sand in Planet of the Apes.)

The mayor that town wants to keep it there and open a tourist attraction around it, bringing in supposed millions of dollars.
That is the great thing about people from NY/NJ...always thinking about funny things like that.
Of course they will build a new coaster to replace it and a new boardwalk

And that is where Snookie and friends taped their tv show "Jersey Shore".
Maybe decades from now a dig will unearth those treasures and people will wonder how low New Jersey people went to have a show like that.

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Reply New Jersey wants to make a tourist attraction out of Seaside Heights Roller Coaster that is in ocean (Original post)
graham4anything Nov 2012 OP
Cooley Hurd Nov 2012 #1
rucky Nov 2012 #2
TheCowsCameHome Nov 2012 #3
ProgressiveProfessor Nov 2012 #4

Response to graham4anything (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:44 AM

1. Another Jersey Shore community tried to do something similar in 1934

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Morro_Castle_(1930)#Disaster_strikes_the_SS_Morro_Castle

At around 2:50 a.m. on 8 September, while the ship was sailing around eight nautical miles off Long Beach Island, a fire was detected in a storage locker within the First Class Writing Room on B Deck. Within the next 30 minutes, the Morro Castle became engulfed in flames. As the fire grew in intensity, Acting Captain Warms attempted to beach the ship, but the growing need to launch lifeboats and abandon ship forced him to give up this strategy. Within 20 minutes of the fire's discovery (at approximately 3:10), the fire burned through the ship's main electrical cables, plunging the ship into darkness. As all power was lost, the radio stopped working as well, so that the crew were cut off from radio contact after issuing a single SOS transmission. At about the same time, the wheelhouse lost the ability to steer the ship, as those hydraulic lines were severed by the fire as well. Cut off by the fire amidships, passengers tended to gravitate toward the stern. Most crew members, on the other hand, moved to the forecastle. On the ship, no one could see anything. In many places, the deck boards were hot to the touch, and it was hard to breathe through the thick smoke. As conditions grew steadily worse, the decision became either "jump or burn" for many passengers. However, jumping into the water was problematic as well. The sea, whipped by high winds, churned in great waves that made it extremely difficult to swim.

<snip>

By mid-morning, the ship was totally abandoned and its burning hull drifted ashore, coming to a stop in shallow water off Asbury Park, New Jersey late that afternoon at almost the exact spot that the New Era had wrecked in 1854. The fires continued to smolder for the next two days and in the end, 135 passengers and crew (out of a total of 549) were lost. The ship was declared a total loss, and its charred hulk was finally towed away from the Asbury Park shoreline on 14 March 1935, and, according to one account, later started settling by the stern, and sank while being towed up the river. In the intervening months, because of its proximity to the boardwalk and the Asbury Park Convention Center pier, from which it was possible to wade out and touch the wreck with one's hands, it was treated as a destination for sightseeing trips, complete with stamped penny souvenirs and postcards for sale. (Other accounts have it that the ship was towed to Gravesend Bay on March 14, 1935, after serving as an Asbury Park attraction, and then to Baltimore on the 29th, where it was scrapped.

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Response to graham4anything (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 07:49 AM

2. Until the first kid swims out to climb on it

the attorneys will love that.

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Response to graham4anything (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 08:22 AM

3. "Look at me, Ma - I'm waving from the top"

Maybe not such a hot idea, Mr. Mayor............

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Response to graham4anything (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 09:36 AM

4. This is a job for Super Mayor Mikey

unless he is too busy with his high potential for being felons fellow 1%ers

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