HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » DEA Agent Says He Was Tol...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 09:32 AM

DEA Agent Says He Was Told Not To Enforce Drug Laws In White Areas

DEA Agent Says He Was Told Not To Enforce Drug Laws In White Areas

Meet Matthew Fogg, a former U.S. Marshal whose exploits led him to be nicknamed “Batman.” When he noticed that all of his team’s drug raids were in black areas, he suggested doing the same in the suburbs.

“If we were locking up everybody, white and black, for doing the same drugs they would’ve done the same thing with prohibition, they would’ve outlawed it,” Fogg says in the video produced by Brave New Films. “If it were an equal enforcement opportunity we wouldn’t be sitting here anyway.”

Video at link
http://colorlines.com/archives/2012/11/dea_agent_says_he_was_told_not_to_enforce_drug_laws_in_white_areas.html

37 replies, 4966 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 37 replies Author Time Post
Reply DEA Agent Says He Was Told Not To Enforce Drug Laws In White Areas (Original post)
The Straight Story Nov 2012 OP
hobbit709 Nov 2012 #1
Scuba Nov 2012 #2
Romulox Nov 2012 #3
think Nov 2012 #4
RKP5637 Nov 2012 #5
Egalitarian Thug Nov 2012 #35
RKP5637 Nov 2012 #36
Romulox Nov 2012 #6
Major Nikon Nov 2012 #8
stlsaxman Nov 2012 #10
northoftheborder Nov 2012 #7
willhe Nov 2012 #9
47of74 Nov 2012 #23
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #30
allan01 Nov 2012 #11
bloomington-lib Nov 2012 #12
vaberella Nov 2012 #15
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #31
vaberella Nov 2012 #33
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #34
AlbertCat Nov 2012 #16
Patiod Nov 2012 #17
kartski Nov 2012 #24
marmar Nov 2012 #13
NOLALady Nov 2012 #14
Jackpine Radical Nov 2012 #19
Arctic Dave Nov 2012 #26
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #32
AllyCat Nov 2012 #18
Jackpine Radical Nov 2012 #21
ProudProgressiveNow Nov 2012 #20
Dirty Socialist Nov 2012 #22
Festivito Nov 2012 #25
ProgressiveEconomist Nov 2012 #27
Ghost in the Machine Nov 2012 #28
progressoid Nov 2012 #29
butterfly77 Nov 2012 #37

Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 09:33 AM

1. "I'm shocked, shocked I tell you"

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 09:35 AM

2. Who's surprised? Not me, certainly.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 09:35 AM

3. I believe it. I've witnessed it.


“If we were locking up everybody, white and black, for doing the same drugs they would’ve done the same thing with prohibition, they would’ve outlawed it,”


Jesus christ this is a powerful point.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 09:37 AM

4. K&R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 09:38 AM

5. Americas' four worlds! Black vs. White. And Haves vs. Have-nots. Often worlds apart for about

everything. Yep, drug laws are for them, but not for us.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RKP5637 (Reply #5)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 03:01 PM

35. I'd say three. I've found that race is largely irrelevant among the haves. Black, white, asian,

 

they're all more than willing to band together to keep their organized crimes going.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #35)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 04:34 PM

36. That's a very good point! "... race is largely irrelevant among the haves." I think we see that

quite often.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 09:39 AM

6. The War on Drugs is the modern Jim Crow. Why are so few talking about it? nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Romulox (Reply #6)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 10:07 AM

8. Because freedom is nothing more than a slogan on a t-shirt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Major Nikon (Reply #8)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 10:35 AM

10. As Patrick Mcgoohan said: "Freedom is a myth".

one of my favorite quotes.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 09:59 AM

7. Yes - this needs to be talked about -----

This is not surprising, but the hearing and seeing of it told is unusual ----------------

Justice in this country is often absent.............


Equal protection under the law................NOT

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 10:23 AM

9. Hence why i've always been drug free...

As a black male I often talk to young black men about this issue. The drugs they could care less about. Incarceration is a for profit institution with a purpose. Once incarcerated they lose their right to vote. That is the ultimate goal.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to willhe (Reply #9)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:54 AM

23. There are several things that I would do to the Constitution tomorrow if I had the opportunity

If you're 16 or older you would have the right to vote no matter what. Even if you've been convicted of a crime and are currently serving time. The only exceptions would be two - voter suppression or treason.

Corporations would not be considered people and would have no rights beyond what the people deign to give them. They would be absolutely forbidden to participate in political campaigns.

Voter suppression would be a capital crime.

The part about being allowed for a crime which someone has been convicted of would be removed from the 13th amendment. There would be no slavery, period. Violations of this would also be a capital crime.

Private ownership or operation of correctional institutions would be absolutely forbidden.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to willhe (Reply #9)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 04:09 AM

30. I'd like to tell all kids, black, white or otherwise, that media culture is designed to

 

make them waste their lives on fruitless pursuits -- drugs being one of them.

I also believe drug use feeds the coffers of the 1%, another reason I don't use them.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 10:59 AM

11. re:DEA Agent Says He Was Told Not To Enforce Drug Laws In White Areas

the war on drugs was a war on minoritys started by richard nixon. period . esp : blacks. total waste of time . also someone who was a corrections guard said that this supervisor told him , the reason drugs wernt reaglelized after that era( i cant think straight this oorning or spell straight ) because the drugs would interfere with the alchaol and tobaco companies profits . meh

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:02 AM

12. I've know many, many, white people to be arrested and harrassed for drugs or the suspicion

of having drugs. I don't doubt that there is a huge difference between black/white incarcerations and harassment. But saying cops don't mess with white people is inaccurate. Maybe it depends on which suburbs, and more a matter of money than color. My experience comes from lower middle class to around poverty level.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bloomington-lib (Reply #12)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:08 AM

15. That's not really suburban level then...if these people are at poverty level.

So I can understand that. However there is a disproportionate number---one of the other differences is that not many of the dealers who are Black are actually touching the stuff themselves.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to vaberella (Reply #15)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 04:11 AM

31. A suburb is the hinterland of a city. They're not necessarily upscale.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Reply #31)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 12:27 PM

33. But with poverty stricken area?

Well I'm from New York. The poor live in apartment buildings (housing projects), not suburbs.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to vaberella (Reply #33)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 01:30 PM

34. the nyt says a little different.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bloomington-lib (Reply #12)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:09 AM

16. I don't think the laws have been applied evenly...

.... but I seem to remember hippies of all colors getting harrassed.... but things have changed a lot since then.

And "Reefer Madness" doesn't have any blacks in it, does it?.... but things have changed.

I love all those blues songs from the 20's-40's about pot. I like the term "viper". "I'm viper mad!".

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bloomington-lib (Reply #12)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:14 AM

17. I used to call it "DWP" -- driving while poor

When my lily-white boyfriend-at-the-time, an excellent driver, drove his beat up old car into the upper-crust Main Line, he was stopped and ticketed every single time. It got so he would say "I need to pick up something in Bryn Mawr - can I borrow your car?"

As soon as he bought an ancient BMW from a friend (crap car which looked good outside, but had serious frame issues after several bad accidents), it ceased. He was never stopped again. Never.

DWB is clearly a thing - black drivers get pulled over all the time for no reason, no matter what they're driving.

I'm only suggesting that some percent of DWB is DWP.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Patiod (Reply #17)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:55 AM

24. Racial Profiling

When I first heard about it decades ago, the target was Black Males in Rental Cars doing the Speed Limit
on I-95. They were abiding the law, so they must be smuggling coke from Fl. to the Northeast.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:03 AM

13. Quelle Surprise !!!

nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:05 AM

14. Prohibition

is the definition of insanity. If it didn't work before, only the insane would think it would work the second time around. Prohibition caused a rise in crime and violence the first time around. Could they have really believed it would be different on the second try?

Or maybe prohibition has worked as planned. It's caused widespread death and destruction in low income and minority neighborhoods.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to NOLALady (Reply #14)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:41 AM

19. It DID work the first time, and it's working now.

The rise in crime & violence is the intended effect. It supports the incarceration industry, justifies a militarized police, enables confiscation of citizens property, and otherwise contributes to the overall mission of jackbooted social control. Discriminatory enforcement is the whole goddam POINT. What's not to like about a policy like that?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Jackpine Radical (Reply #19)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:24 PM

26. +1000

 

Nail on the head.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Jackpine Radical (Reply #19)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 04:12 AM

32. +1.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:41 AM

18. Everyone knows white people don't commit crime.

They get into "trouble" and get their hands slapped. Unless they wear a suit and tie when they do it. Then they get a bonus.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to AllyCat (Reply #18)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:46 AM

21. PROSPEROUS white people con't commit crime.

I spent a lot of years working for WI Corrections, and I can tell you that poverty is at least a powerful determinant of police action as race. However, the two are of course strongly confounded in our society, so it's hard to separate the differential contributions of the 2 variables.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink



Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:51 AM

22. I Thought Racial Profiling Didn't Exist

/snark

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:22 PM

25. If true, all drug convictions against black people should be vacated with prejudice.

And, they should be properly compensated.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 06:47 PM

27. Blame 'Drug-Free School ZONE' laws. They are the mechanism generating most of the racial disparity

They are the mechanism generating most of the racial disparity

in arrests and sentencing. The metrics by which the DEA, police and prosecutors are judged and PAID are arrests and years sentenced. Ostensibly, these laws are color-blind, but anybody who can read a map can see that bonuses for the authrities from arrests within 1000 feet of a school, park, or government housing project largely exempt the suburbs and target cities where large swaths of neighborhoods are predominantly Black. The authorities respond to incentives which have HUGE built-in racial biases.

From http://www.justicestrategies.org/news/2006/03/drug-free-school-zone-laws-questioned

"Drug-Free School Zone Laws Questioned
National Racial Disparity
Sentencing Policy
The Associated Press
By: David Crary
Published: March 23, 2006

In reaction to the crack epidemic of the 1980s, laws creating drug-free zones around schools spread nationwide. Now, hard questions are being raised — by legislators, activists, even law enforcement officials — about the fairness and effectiveness of those laws. In New Jersey, Connecticut and Washington state, bills have been proposed to sharply reduce the size of the zones. A former assistant attorney general in Massachusetts reviewed hundreds of drug-free-zone cases, and found that less than 1 percent involved drug sales to youths.

Citing such developments, the Washington-based Justice Policy Institute is issuing a report Thursday that contends such laws, which generally carry extra-stiff mandatory penalties, have done little to safeguard young people and are enforced disproportionately on blacks and Hispanics. "For two decades, policy-makers have mistakenly assumed that these statutes shield children from drug activity," said report co-author Judith Greene, a New York-based researcher. "We found no evidence that drug-free zone laws protect children, but ample evidence that the laws hurt communities of color and contribute to mounting correctional costs." ,,, "When the overlap of zones in densely populated areas covers the entire city, the idea of special protection loses its meaning -- people don't know they're in a school zone," said Ben Barlyn, a deputy attorney general and executive director of the sentencing review panel. "It would be as if we made the entire New Jersey Turnpike a reduced speed zone."

Barlyn said New Jersey prosecutors and police chiefs had no objection to shrinking the zones. In Washington, state Sen. Adam Kline has proposed reducing drug-free school zones from 1,000 feet to 200 feet, and limiting the law's application to regular school hours. In Connecticut, a hearing is scheduled Friday on a bill that would reduce school zones from 1,500 feet to 200 feet. At recent meetings, activists with Connecticut's A Better Way Foundation -- which supports the bill -- have displayed maps of major cities showing huge sections designated as drug-free zones. A map of New Haven indicated that Yale University's golf course was the only large part of the city not encompassed in one of the overlapping zones.

Most states have drug-free-zone laws; they often entail mandatory prison terms that preclude such options as probation or treatment. Lolita Buckner Inniss, a Cleveland State University law professor, is a vocal critic of the laws. Her research found that drug dealers in inner cities and compact rural towns were disproportionately likely to incur the extra penalties, in contrast to dealers in suburbs where zones covered relatively small portions of the communities. That urban-suburban split has the effect of making minorities more likely to bear the brunt of tougher sentencing rules, she said. "I've been dissatisfied by how the public mutely accepts these laws," she said",

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 06:57 PM

28. I wonder if this is the same "Batman" I almost went to jail for, for blowing his cover in Homestead,

Florida back in '89 or '90? What a small, strange world that would be, huh?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 02:57 AM

29. Rec.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Straight Story (Original post)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 10:27 PM

37. K&R..

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread