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Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:58 PM

 

Why Mass Incarceration Defines Us As a Society (Smithsonian. From Slavery to Prisons)

A lengthy article but well written and terribly informative.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/people-places/Why-Mass-Incarceration-Defines-Us-As-a-Society-179994441.html


Bryan Stevenson crusades for thousands of young people in America's prisons.

It is late in the afternoon in Montgomery. The banks of the Alabama River are largely deserted. Bryan Stevenson and I walk slowly up the cobblestones from the expanse of the river into the city. We pass through a small, gloomy tunnel beneath some railway tracks, climb a slight incline and stand at the head of Commerce Street, which runs into the heart of Alabama’s capital. The walk was one of the most notorious in the antebellum South.

“This street was the most active slave-trading space in America for almost a decade,” Stevenson says. Four slave depots stood nearby. “They would bring people off the boat. They would parade them up the street in chains. White plantation owners and local slave traders would get on the sidewalks. They’d watch them as they went up the street. Then they would follow behind up to the circle. And that is when they would have their slave auctions.

“Anybody they didn’t sell that day they would keep in these slave depots,” he continues.

We walk past a monument to the Confederate flag as we retrace the steps taken by tens of thousands of slaves who were chained together in coffles. The coffles could include 100 or more men, women and children, all herded by traders who carried guns and whips. Once they reached Court Square, the slaves were sold. We stand in the square. A bronze fountain with a statue of the Goddess of Liberty spews jets of water in the plaza.

“Montgomery was notorious for not having rules that required slave traders to prove that the person had been formally enslaved,” Stevenson says. “You could kidnap free black people, bring them to Montgomery and sell them. They also did not have rules that restricted the purchasing of partial families.”

We fall silent. It was here in this square—a square adorned with a historical marker celebrating the presence in Montgomery of Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederacy—that men and women fell to their knees weeping and beseeched slave-holders not to separate them from their husbands, wives or children. It was here that girls and boys screamed as their fathers or mothers were taken from them. /snip


Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/people-places/Why-Mass-Incarceration-Defines-Us-As-a-Society-179994441.html#ixzz2Cv802iaS

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Reply Why Mass Incarceration Defines Us As a Society (Smithsonian. From Slavery to Prisons) (Original post)
Whovian Nov 2012 OP
PETRUS Nov 2012 #1

Response to Whovian (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:25 PM

1. Interesting topic. Bookmarking for later reading.

Thanks for posting.

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