HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » $0.62 per hour Factory Jo...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:50 PM

 

$0.62 per hour Factory Jobs In Haiti "Not ‘Perfect’ But A Start," says Clinton

In Haiti’s underdeveloped northeast, a new $300 million industrial park, which was partially funded by the U.S. government, has been opened with the aim of creating thousands of jobs, attracting foreign investment and helping the impoverished country to recover from the devastating impact of the 2010 earthquake.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, who is also the U.N. special envoy to Haiti, joined Haiti’s President Michel Martelly at the opening ceremony for the park in the fishing village of Caracol on the north coast.

Sec. Clinton acknowledged that the project was not “perfect....What development project anywhere in the world is? And there will be frustration from time to time,” she said at the opening ceremony. “But for all of the inevitable challenges, today and the development here represents a new opportunity for Haiti.”

http://www.haitian-truth.org/slavery-returns-to-haiti-0-62-per-hour-factory-jobs-in-haiti-not-perfect-but-a-start-for-recovery-clinton-says/


Meanwhile, despite all the money raised by the Clinton-Bush people after the earthquake two years ago, 400,000 Haitians are still living in tents and Port au Prince has not been rebuilt.

http://www.haitian-truth.org/slavery-returns-to-haiti-0-62-per-hour-factory-jobs-in-haiti-not-perfect-but-a-start-for-recovery-clinton-says/

Where the hell is the money going? I suspect it's mostly funneling back to westerners -- contractors, NGOs, religious groups -- through various mechanisms.

38 replies, 2039 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 38 replies Author Time Post
Reply $0.62 per hour Factory Jobs In Haiti "Not ‘Perfect’ But A Start," says Clinton (Original post)
HiPointDem Nov 2012 OP
MichiganVote Nov 2012 #1
msongs Nov 2012 #2
MichiganVote Nov 2012 #7
ForgoTheConsequence Nov 2012 #3
MichiganVote Nov 2012 #6
ForgoTheConsequence Nov 2012 #8
MichiganVote Nov 2012 #9
ForgoTheConsequence Nov 2012 #12
Posteritatis Nov 2012 #10
MichiganVote Nov 2012 #11
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #18
MichiganVote Nov 2012 #22
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #29
LukeFL Nov 2012 #4
The Wielding Truth Nov 2012 #5
leftlibdem420 Nov 2012 #15
limpyhobbler Nov 2012 #13
KT2000 Nov 2012 #14
Teamster Jeff Nov 2012 #16
wilsonbooks Nov 2012 #21
RB TexLa Nov 2012 #17
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #19
newspeak Nov 2012 #27
raouldukelives Nov 2012 #24
vaberella Nov 2012 #34
Egalitarian Thug Nov 2012 #20
JCMach1 Nov 2012 #23
bhikkhu Nov 2012 #25
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #30
JCMach1 Nov 2012 #32
marmar Nov 2012 #36
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #37
JCMach1 Nov 2012 #38
tblue Nov 2012 #26
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #31
dembotoz Nov 2012 #28
Zorra Nov 2012 #33
vaberella Nov 2012 #35

Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:53 PM

1. You know, Haiti b/f the French colonialism was a paradise of forests

They have lost their way for over a 100 years.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MichiganVote (Reply #1)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:55 PM

2. more haitians = less forest, same thing applies everywhere else too nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to msongs (Reply #2)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:03 PM

7. Actually it was the French who began denuding the country of its resources

Others were quick to follow.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MichiganVote (Reply #1)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:56 PM

3. Lost their way?

They've done what they had to do to survive. That country has been fucked over by everyone and their mother.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ForgoTheConsequence (Reply #3)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:02 PM

6. They only survive by the grace of others. Its not a country that lives.

But they were a thriving community b/f they became the arm pit port of the world.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MichiganVote (Reply #6)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:04 PM

8. Oh right.

The west has been so gracious. They should be thanking us for years of exploitation and colonization.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ForgoTheConsequence (Reply #8)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:05 PM

9. I don't think you and I have a disagreement. To read/learn the history of Haiti

is very interesting. Try it some time.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MichiganVote (Reply #9)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:09 PM

12. I'm aware of it.

And I've actually been to Haiti, more than once. Thanks though.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MichiganVote (Reply #6)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:06 PM

10. It's rather more "they survive despite the grace of others." (nt)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Posteritatis (Reply #10)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:09 PM

11. And that could be. Climate change will result in desperation in many

desperate places on the planet. We will all have to learn to live with that. Most than one culture will not survive.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MichiganVote (Reply #6)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:12 AM

18. by the grace of others? wtf? they survive *despite* the pernicious "grace" of others.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Reply #18)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 08:01 AM

22. I am referring to the worldwide network of foundations/churches

and governments that provide to Haitian citizens. You seem to be thinking of something different.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MichiganVote (Reply #22)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 03:33 PM

29. that network makes money off the deal. despite all those helping hands, half a

 

million haitians are still living in tents, two years after, and the streets of the biggest city in the country are still in rubble, as the 'helpers' drive around in range rovers & eat at fancy restaurants.

the 'help' is killing them.

for example, haiti was basically self-sufficient in rice production until trade liberalization in the 80s. The US dumped its own subsidized rice and 'aid' rice on haiti thereafter, putting farmers out of business & putting their land up for grabs.

thanks for the 'help' usa.

and churches? don't get me started on the shock troops of capitalism.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:59 PM

4. The way I see it

They start from somwhere, train them And teach them some kind of skilled or unskilled or work ir let them go down into oblivion forever.

Clinton is right. With Haiti, we have to start somewhere. The country is desparate and need some immediate solution.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:01 PM

5. That's another example of no government no infrastructure and no resources.Sadly anything will help.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Wielding Truth (Reply #5)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:54 PM

15. Sounds like Heaven, as interpreted by Grover Norquist

 

Haitians have never known a day when neither France nor the United States was holding them up for money.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:11 PM

13. hmmm. nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:48 PM

14. why should foreign companies

get away with such low wages in Haiti.
The executives just keep the profits when they are able to exploit workers in a place of such poverty and need.
Disgusting.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:06 AM

16. It's just a start

They will probably get them down to 40 cents per hour

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Teamster Jeff (Reply #16)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 03:19 AM

21. bingo!!!! We have a winner.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:11 AM

17. Look at how industry in the US began? We had child labor, slavelike wages. Yes it's not


perfect but you do have to start somewhere.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RB TexLa (Reply #17)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:21 AM

19. haitians have had factories where they could work for peanuts for some time.

 

Disney's Hell in Haiti
Haiti Progres, "This Week in Haiti,"
Vol. 13, no. 41, 3-9 January 1996

Workers stitching clothing emblazoned with feel-good Disney characters are not even paid enough to feed themselves, let alone their families, charges the New York-based National Labor Committee Education Fund in Support of Worker and Human Rights in Central America (NLC). "Haitian contractors producing Mickey Mouse and Pocahontas pajamas for U.S. companies under license with the Walt Disney Corporation are in some cases paying workers as little as 15 gourdes (US$1) per day -- 12 cents an hour -- in clear violation of Haitian law," said the NLC....

Over the past two decades, U.S. State Department officials have consistently prescribed development of the "transformation industry" as the antidote to Haitian poverty. In the early 1980s, about 250 factories employed over 60,000 Haitian workers in Port- au-Prince. The minimum wage then was US$2.64 a day. But many sweat-shops fled Haiti after the fall of the dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier in 1986....

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&tbo=d&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&q=haiti+factories+disney&oq=haiti+factories+disney&gs_l=hp.3..0i8i30.2323.5869.1.6424.22.20.0.0.0.1.707.7094.0j1j10j5j0j3j1.20.0.les%3B..0.0...1c.1.lIaXucOo7FU&psj=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=a2751f35b72ca7d0&bpcl=38897761&biw=987&bih=597


What cost $2.64 in 1985 would cost $5.43 in 2011. So at .62 cents a day, it seems Haitians are making less in 2012 than they did 27 years ago in 1985.

So how long does it take, in your estimation? When do people get off this starting line?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Reply #19)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 01:18 PM

27. yes, it was poor wages before the earthquake

it's exploitive worst wages after.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RB TexLa (Reply #17)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:30 AM

24. Yep. We figured out how to export the Triangle Shirtwaist Company overseas

and now everyone who wants to can invest and profit from the same conditions they read about and lamented the loss of in history class without leaving the comfort of their McMansion.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RB TexLa (Reply #17)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 04:38 PM

34. There were factories in Haiti since the 50s---introduced by the Americans under Papa Doc.

So it's not news. I like how they pimp it out as news.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 03:01 AM

20. "it's mostly funneling back to westerners -- contractors, NGOs, religious groups"

 

That's exactly where it goes. That's exactly the purpose of those groups, organizations, and institutions. The individual members desire to help, but the reality is just what you suppose.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 08:54 AM

23. case of .62 beats the hell out of 0

Sadly...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JCMach1 (Reply #23)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:42 AM

25. If it leads to something better

that's the key. There have been plenty of new beginnings and high hopes there, mostly based on how easy it is to plan for something better when you have nothing but misery. I hope this time it actually leads to something better.

Incidentally, in the recent book "1493" there's a fascinating section on how the Haitian ex-slaves, after defeating their French masters, then foiling British attempts at conquest, finally destroyed one of Napoleon's armies, which had been planned to use Haiti as an outpost to expand a French American Empire. As it happened, the losses in Haiti led directly to the French abandonment of North America, and the Louisiana purchase. So one might say we owe Haiti quite a bit, or at least the South does!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JCMach1 (Reply #23)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 03:43 PM

30. getting fed in a prison may be better than starving on the streets, but who would

 

use that fact to tout prisons?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Reply #30)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 04:00 PM

32. American prisons would be superior to most of the slums in this world...

Haven't been to Haiti, but I have been to the slums of Kathamandu and Kabira in Nairobi, Kenya.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JCMach1 (Reply #32)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 04:40 PM

36. WTF?


Umm, it's still a prison. ..... Dios mio.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JCMach1 (Reply #32)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 05:01 PM

37. guess the answer to my question is...jcmach1 would....

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Reply #37)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 10:11 PM

38. It can be really, really, really bad

do you really want to know about the 4 yr. old beggar orphan in Kathmandu with dirt rings around his mouth and nose where the dust and dirt collected on the glue residue he huffs on a regular basis to ward off hunger. The glue was cheaper than food... I would rather not go on...

Yeah, some things are worse than prison...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:36 PM

26. This is the Shock Doctrine.

And poor Haiti is in perpetual shock. Can't Sec. Clinton pressure the mftr for a higher wage? Of course she could. No excuses. This is industrial greed and disdain and exploitation, while our we pat ourselves on the back for our generosity.

I hadn't heard this bit of news, so thanks for the op.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tblue (Reply #26)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 03:43 PM

31. +1

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 01:35 PM

28. appears our minimum standards are pretty welll.....minimum

don't tell romney

we found a place fairly local with even lower standards than china
and the democrats will slap you on the back if you send a few american jobs there.

i guess on thankgiving i am thankful that by the fluke of birth--i was born is wisconsin and not Port au Prince

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 04:32 PM

33. “All cultures forged by nations ~

the noble indigenous past of America, the brilliant civilization of Europe, the wise history of Asian nations, and the ancestral wealth of Africa and Oceania—are corroded by the American way of life. In this way, neoliberalism imposes the destruction of nations and groups of nations in order to reconstruct them according to a single model. This is a planetary war, of the worst and cruelest kind, waged against humanity.”

It is in this context which Subcomandante Marcos believes that the EZLN and other indigenous movements across the world are fighting back. He sees the EZLN as one of many "pockets of resistance."

“It is not only in the mountains of southeastern Mexico that neoliberalism is being resisted. In other regions of Mexico, in Latin America, in the United States and in Canada, in the Europe of the Maastricht Treaty, in Africa, in Asia, and in Oceania, pockets of resistance are multiplying. Each has its own history, its specificities, its similarities, its demands, its struggles, its successes. If humanity wants to survive and improve, its only hope resides in these pockets made up of the excluded, the left-for-dead, the ‘disposable.’”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subcomandante_Marcos


"Marcos, the quintessential anti-leader, insists that his black mask is a mirror, so that ‘Marcos is gay in San Francisco, black in South Africa, an Asian in Europe, a Chicano in San Ysidro, an anarchist in Spain, a Palestinian in Israel, a Mayan Indian in the streets of San Cristobal, a Jew in Germany, a Gypsy in Poland, a Mohawk in Quebec, a pacifist in Bosnia, a single woman on the Metro at 10 p.m., a peasant without land, a gang member in the slums, an unemployed worker, an unhappy student and, of course, a Zapatista in the mountains’. In other words, he is simply us: we are the leader we’ve been looking for."
~~~Naomi Klein


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 04:39 PM

35. As a Haitian person and knowing Haitian people. They are quick to read slavery when they see it.

Haitians will burn that industry down and there will be no success with this. Haitians don't like outsiders for too long. They are all like, love love love and then when they see they can't get anything from you or you are not doing anything for them, they will destroy you. This is why at this time in the world when you hear "coup d'etat" most people equate it to Haiti.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread