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Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:29 PM

 

Pearson (education deform corp) says oxygen turns blood from blue to red.

November 17, 2012

To Whom It May Concern,

My school recently purchased Pearson's Interactive Science for our middle school students (6-8 Grades). While preparing for a lesson, I happened upon the following quote, from the Interactive Physical Science book 1 TE, p.119 Under "Science and Society": "The influx of oxygen changes blood's color from blue to red...Have students examine their arms to see if they have any blue veins. Explain that the blood in those veins is headed back to the heart and lung to receive more oxygen."

...Even cursory editing would have prevented this error. Human blood is never blue. Hemoglobin turns bright red when oxygenated. Deoxygenated (vertebrate) blood is dark red. Mollusks and some arthropods use hemocyanin, which turns blue when oxygenated due to the copper it contains, but our blood is never blue. Pigments in skin cause veins to appear blue...

I will now thoroughly check these science texts to make sure that I do not have to waste valuable instructional time addressing this and other foolishness...

Please address this problem in future versions.

Oscar Newman, NBCT (EA Science 2002, 2011) 7-8 Grade Science and Math Teacher, Chicago Academy Elementary School

So far, Oscar tells me he has received no call-back from Pearson. So for millions of American public school students and their teachers, human blood remains blue -- at least for the purpose of getting the answer right on the test.

http://michaelklonsky.blogspot.com/2012/11/in-pearson-we-trust-really-but-our.html

11 replies, 1266 views

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Arrow 11 replies Author Time Post
Reply Pearson (education deform corp) says oxygen turns blood from blue to red. (Original post)
HiPointDem Nov 2012 OP
oldhippydude Nov 2012 #1
OhZone Nov 2012 #2
Fozzledick Nov 2012 #3
TrueBlueinCO Nov 2012 #4
xfundy Nov 2012 #6
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #7
xfundy Nov 2012 #5
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #8
Saving Hawaii Nov 2012 #9
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #11
kestrel91316 Nov 2012 #10

Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:44 PM

1. why of course we all know blue bloods don't we...n/t

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:45 PM

2. My blood is green. Fascinating. nt

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Response to OhZone (Reply #2)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:48 PM

3. I fail to see your logic.

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:09 PM

4. Actually...

 

Actually, veins appear blue because only the higher energy wavelengths of light toward the blue end of the spectrum have the energy necessary to penetrate through the skin and be reflected back out.

So Newman and Pearson are both wrong.

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Response to TrueBlueinCO (Reply #4)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:25 PM

6. How DARE you disagree with a True Christian™?

Welcome to DU.

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Response to TrueBlueinCO (Reply #4)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:36 AM

7. actually, it's multifactorial and pearson is wrong; blood is never blue. it just looks

 

blue in some circumstances.

newman isn't wrong; pigmentation plays a part, it's just not the sole factor.


The most comprehensive answer that I’ve been able to find comes from a paper by Kienle et al. published over twelve years ago in the journal Applied Optics and entitled “Why do veins appear blue? A new look at an old question”.

Based on the findings of the authors, three reasons emerge for the blue appearance of veins in skin. The first two are physical and stem directly from the way in which light interacts with blood (how it is absorbed) and with skin (in this case, how light is reflected). The final reason is psychological, dealing with the way in which our brain processes information relatively to generate color perception...


http://scienceblogs.com/scientificactivist/2008/04/17/why-are-veins-blue/

http://chemistry.about.com/od/lecturenoteslab1/a/Why-Veins-Look-Blue.htm

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 11:23 PM

5. Wait-- you hear it?

I could almost swear I can hear a faint sound of Slim Whitman records off in the distance. Are the morons' heads just about to explode into a gooey pink mess? Or will it only amount to cracking the shell of a peanut, only to discover nothing inside? That'll save a lot of cleanup.

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:44 AM

8. I have heard this before. It's not true? Well, blow me down. nt

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Response to Honeycombe8 (Reply #8)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:56 AM

9. Ever had blood drawn? Donated?

They typically draw from a vein you know. Good 'ol blue vein. Nice deoxygenated blood. And when you look in the bag or the syringe they're filling up, ain't it always red? Even with very little if any being exposed to oxygen?

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Response to Saving Hawaii (Reply #9)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 11:48 PM

11. I never thought of that. Except...isn't there air in the syringe they draw into?

The blood is normal color, not really dark.

But I must admit, I try not to look when they draw blood. Gets me woozy.

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 01:08 AM

10. You are correct. Oxygenated blood is a brighter red than

blood without much oxygen. Neither is blue (in people or other mammals) - they are both undeniably red. Veins appear blue because, well, they just do.

Now I need to go wash my brain to get rid of the idea that a school text is this poorly edited/researched.

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