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Mon Nov 19, 2012, 11:45 PM

 

Is Eric Swalwell a real Democrat?

http://www.swalwellforcongress.com/do_we_trust_pete_stark_to_represent_our_views

Do We Trust Pete Stark to Represent Our Views?

Congressman Pete Stark one of nine Members of Congress to vote against re-affirming national motto.

Dublin, CA– Yesterday, the U.S. Congress voted 398-9 to re-affirm our national motto, “In God We Trust.” Since 1864, the phrase, “In God We Trust” has appeared on U.S. currency and in 1956 it was recognized as our national motto. Since the Civil War this inspirational motto has captured the spirit of our country and guided its people through world wars and the attacks of September 11.


Introducing the new "Democratic" Congressman from CA-15.

Pete Stark is an atheist. How the fuck do you expect him to vote? This guy claims to be a Democrat, but unless he belongs to the Fred Phelp wing of the Democratic Party, I don't buy it. His views are closer to the spirit of those responsible for September 11 than he is to the spirit that "guided its people through ... September 11."
4 votes, 3 passes | Time left: Unlimited
Yes. The Democratic Party is open to bigots who attack the atheism of a progressive pro-peace paragaon.
0 (0%)
No. He's a Republican who lied about his political beliefs and exploited hatred and ignorance to get elected.
4 (100%)
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Disclaimer: This is an Internet poll

33 replies, 2061 views

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Arrow 33 replies Author Time Post
Reply Is Eric Swalwell a real Democrat? (Original post)
leftlibdem420 Nov 2012 OP
hrmjustin Nov 2012 #1
bayareamike Nov 2012 #2
Ken Burch Nov 2012 #3
leftlibdem420 Nov 2012 #4
Ken Burch Nov 2012 #9
leftlibdem420 Nov 2012 #17
bottomofthehill Nov 2012 #29
demosincebirth Nov 2012 #5
bayareamike Nov 2012 #8
bluestate10 Nov 2012 #26
bluestate10 Nov 2012 #27
bluestate10 Nov 2012 #22
gravity Nov 2012 #6
leftlibdem420 Nov 2012 #7
bottomofthehill Nov 2012 #28
Ken Burch Nov 2012 #10
gravity Nov 2012 #11
Ken Burch Nov 2012 #14
gravity Nov 2012 #18
Ken Burch Nov 2012 #19
leftlibdem420 Nov 2012 #20
bluestate10 Nov 2012 #25
bottomofthehill Nov 2012 #31
leftlibdem420 Nov 2012 #32
bottomofthehill Nov 2012 #33
SpartanDem Nov 2012 #12
Ken Burch Nov 2012 #13
SpartanDem Nov 2012 #15
Ken Burch Nov 2012 #16
bluestate10 Nov 2012 #24
leftlibdem420 Nov 2012 #30
bluestate10 Nov 2012 #23
bluestate10 Nov 2012 #21

Response to leftlibdem420 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 11:49 PM

1. Pete Stark lost. That sucks! This Christian loved that great Atheist Stark. We needed his voice

in congress. I do not know enough about this other guy to make a choice.

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Response to leftlibdem420 (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:26 AM

2. I live in the adjacent district and I used to live in Stark's district.

I followed that race pretty closely and honestly speaking, I'm still not sure whether or not Swalwell is really a liberal. The issues he listed on his campaign website sounded good (regarding ACA, women's rights, etc.) but I have this creeping feeling he really isn't that liberal. He interned for Ellen Tauscher back in the day, for what it's worth.

Here's the good news, though: if he turns out to be a conservative with a Dem label, he'll be gone in 2014. That district and area is very progressive. The word around here is that Ro Khanna (who worked in the Obama Administration as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce) is likely to run in 2014. Being a former member of the Obama Administration, he's going to be a heavyweight if he enters the race, considering how popular the President is out here.

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Response to bayareamike (Reply #2)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:29 AM

3. How did he manage to beat Stark in the primary?

Who did Pete piss off THAT badly among local Dems?

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #3)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:31 AM

4. Nothing.

 

California has jungle primaries now. Stark placed 1st, Swalwell places 2nd, and Republicans (other than Swalwell) accounted for like 10%.

Terrible system. It's going to let conservatives play dirty tricks to win seats in places like San Francisco.

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Response to leftlibdem420 (Reply #4)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:52 AM

9. Then an initiative campaign to get rid of "top two" needs to start immediately.

How the hell did this pass(they got it through in Washington, too)...was it just GOP money?

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #9)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:41 AM

17. It was one of Ah-nold's pathetic "reforms"...

 

http://www.scpr.org/news/2010/06/10/16037/will-californias-open-primary-change-the-political/
http://ballotpedia.org/wiki/index.php/California_Proposition_14,_Top_Two_Primaries_Act_%28June_2010%29

It was a way for pro-establishment, pro-business "moderates" to limit the influence progressives, leftists, and the Tea Party.

Proposition 14 was endorsed by the California Chamber of Commerce and the Latin Business Association. Other prominent supporters included:

John Estrada, a Candidate for Congress based in the Central Valley.
Thomas Elias, a journalist based in southern California.,
Jonathan Alter, a Newsweek columnist.
Tom Campbell, a Republican candidate for Governor of California.
Abel Maldonado.
Allan Hoffenblum, who publishes the California Target Book.
Arnold Schwarzenegger.
Silicon Valley Leadership Group.
Steve Westly, controller of California from 2003 to 2007.
California Forward

A group of local Chambers of Commerce in southeast Los Angeles County that includes the Chambers of Santa Fe Springs, Whittier, Norwalk, and two other cities, rescinded their endorsement of Proposition 14 after hearing presentations from both campaigns on March 12.

"The vast majority of business groups in the state and in Los Angeles County, including the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce, strongly support the proposition, saying that open primaries would result in more centrist candidates, and presumably more business-friendly ones, getting elected to the Legislature."

...

Opponents

California has six ballot-qualified political parties, the Democratic Party, Republican Party, Green Party, Peace & Freedom Party, American Independent Party and the Libertarian Party. The six parties held a joint press coverage on May 11 in Sacramento to express their mutual opposition to Proposition 14.,,

Other notable opponents include:

Richard Winger of Ballot Access News is a leading opponent of the Top-Two Primary proposal. When arguments in favor of the measure are advanced by others, he often counters with a detailed rebuttal.
The group "Californians for Electoral Reform" (CfER). CfER has been organized in California for about ten years. It focuses on ways to make voting more fair.
The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California (ACLU-NC) Board of Directors voted overwhelmingly on February 11, 2010 to oppose Proposition 14 "based upon the ACLU’s strong interest in the value and rights of political parties, including third parties, the potential infringement upon these parties’ First Amendment rights of association, and our previous position in 2004 in opposition to Proposition 62."
State senator Loni Hancock and California State Assembly representative Sandre Swanson.
Steven Greenhut of the Pacific Research Institute.
Bob Cuddy, a columnist with the San Luis Obispo Tribune.
Ralph Nader.
Meg Whitman, a candidate for governor.
The Center for Voting and Democracy (FairVote), a nationwide election reform group, opposes Proposition 14.
The California League of Conservation Voters: "The system will shut out participation by minor parties and make it more difficult for alternate political views to have a place in the general election discussion."



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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #3)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 02:48 AM

29. Almost Everyone

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Response to bayareamike (Reply #2)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:41 AM

5. If you're a republican and want to run for congress in the Bay Area, you have to run as a

democrat. I also have my suspicions about his politics

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Response to demosincebirth (Reply #5)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:44 AM

8. As a side note, Khanna's personal website

sure looks like somebody's who is running or is going to run for Congress:

http://www.rokhanna.com/

Stay tuned, folks.

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Response to bayareamike (Reply #8)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 01:49 AM

26. I would prefer that Khanna run for LtGov. If Swawell votes well, there is not need to contest him.

Khanna would be better advised to run to back up Jerry Brown, then run for the seat when Brown terms out. Khanna appears young enough. Another route would be to run for Feinstein's seat if Dianne don't stop talking like a fucking republican during national security fights.

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Response to demosincebirth (Reply #5)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 01:52 AM

27. Read the guys website. His policy positions are blue. I'm taking a wait and see mindset on him. nt

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Response to bayareamike (Reply #2)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 01:13 AM

22. I agree 100% with you. From reading Swalwell's site, he appears to be a blue-dog and a tab bit

religious. None of that bothers me unless he votes badly or with republicans. He seems to be an avid supporter of green energy and taxing the rich, which are good. I was concerned about his wanting to allow faith based organizations to educate parents to make them more capable of helping their children in school - on the surface, this sound right, but if the education is religious based and not what the YMCA or YWCA, two faith based organizations, do well every day, then I have an issue with what he is proposing.

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Response to leftlibdem420 (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:42 AM

6. He is a Democrat

The Republican party doesn't have a monopoly of dirty campaign tactics.

He might be an asshole, but he is going to support the Democratic causes in Congress.

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Response to gravity (Reply #6)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:44 AM

7. Like what?

 

Treating atheists like second-class citizens? President Obama endorsed Stark.

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Response to leftlibdem420 (Reply #7)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 02:15 AM

28. He is a Democrat, dont just look at one issue

Here is a better idea of where he stands on the issues



Equality
I support full equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. This includes the freedom to marry and the freedom to openly serve in the US military. I also support the repeal of the California’s Proposition 8 and the federal Defense of Marriage Act.

Women
I am 100% pro-choice and support the right of women to have full access to contraception and reproductive health services. I also support passage of the Violence Against Women Act and I support equal pay for equal work.

Immigration
As a prosecutor, it frustrates me that individuals who I have prosecuted that have committed serious and violent crimes – and are here without documentation – are released back into our communities after serving his or her sentence. I support removing violent, convicted criminals who are in our country without documentation. For the vast majority of undocumented individuals who work and contribute to our economy, I support a pathway to legal citizenship. I also support the Dream Act and believe it is in our economic interests (and the right thing to do) to allow children of undocumented individuals who have attended school in the US to have access, not preference, to higher education.

Social Security
Social Security is one of our most successful government programs, lifting seniors out of poverty and offering most seniors the only means of retirement income. To ensure the long-term viability of the program, I support lifting the cap on wages above $110,000 and also support raising the retirement age gradually and tying it to life expectancy rates.

Medicare
I am opposed to any plan that dismantles Medicare and the guarantee of health insurance for our seniors. Current proposals in Congress to move seniors into an insurance exchange that will require them to find their own private insurance and the government will help pay the premium will cost the average senior $6,000 a year in out-of-pocket expenses. This is unacceptable.

To ensure the long-term viability of Medicare, we must do more to better deliver health care, especially preventative care, and hold down the rising cost of providing medical care. As a prosecutor who has prosecuted fraud cases, it is important that we fight Medicare fraud to realize savings.  Also, we must have a Sustainable Growth Rate, that sets what a physician is paid for services, that is fair but controlled for physicians.

Citizens United
I oppose the recent US Supreme Court decision granting corporations the same first amendment rights to free speech as individuals. This ruling has opened a floodgate of unlimited corporate campaign contributions to Super PACS who buy influence and have an unfair financial advantage in gaming our political system and winning campaigns.

Affordable Care Act
I support the Affordable Care Act and the benefits that many are already receiving, including health insurance coverage for children up to age 26 under a parent’s health insurance. I also believe we need to do more to control the costs of providing health care. For instance, as a member of the Alameda County Fire Commission, we developed a pilot project that provides low-cost preventative health care at our fire stations. We need to do more to provide preventative health care that is accessible and affordable to avoid higher costs for health care later.

Transportation
People want to spend less time commuting and more time with their family.

As a resident of the Tri-Valley and Bay Area, I understand, like you do, the importance of maintaining and expanding our region’s transportation system. The productivity of our businesses depends on an increasingly mobile workforce and local businesses depend on this system to ship and receive their products and render services on-time. And, to sustain our high quality of life in the Bay Area, people want to spend less time in their cars and more time with their families.

Cities, counties, the State, and our Representative in Congress need to work together to leverage local investments to secure federal dollars to advance local projects. We will reap benefits sooner and reduce gridlock and air pollution, while increasing productivity and creating good paying jobs.

The Bay Area has a history of “self-help” when it comes to paying for transportation improvements. Seven of the nine counties in the Bay Area have passed local sales taxes (passed by a 2/3 margin) to fund local streets/roads, highway and transit projects. This guarantee of local funding helps attract federal dollars. But, we need a Representative in Congress willing to fight for our region’s transportation priorities in Congress.

This November, voters in Alameda County will have the opportunity to renew Measure B, the local one-cent sales tax that will generate $7.8 billion in new funding to invest in a set list of transportation improvements (Measure B expenditure plan). This plan would fund many important projects that I support-like extending BART to Livermore as well as rehabilitating BART’s aging infrastructure, stations and railcars. Measure B also invests in high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) and express lanes on I-580 and I-680 as well as in local streets and roads. Express lanes are HOV lanes that provide single-occupant vehicle drivers a choice to pay a toll in order to bypass congestion and have a fast, reliable trip time. These express lanes will help us manage our network of freeways in the Bay Area while giving commuters a new choice. And, express lanes are one more tool for generating revenue to reinvest in maintaining the roads and improving transit in these corridors.

The 15th Congressional District and Bay Area deserve a strong federal partner to leverage these local investments by ensuring the Bay Area gets its fair share of federal funding and accelerate delivery of key infrastructure projects that will keep our region moving.

Environment
I have been an active champion for a healthy Earth and a national Green Energy Policy that reduces our greenhouse gas emissions. I am a Advisory Member of the Tri-Valley Conservancy, a land conservation group. On the Dublin City Council, I successfully passed a wine and open space initiative that will allow more open space in Dublin, and encourage further land be used for viticulture and agriculture. I understands that the United States has 3% of the world's oil supply while consuming 20% of the world's oil. We must have an all of the above approach to provide our energy needs and reduce our dependence on foreign sources of energy.

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Response to gravity (Reply #6)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:53 AM

10. You sure about that? And how is he preferable to Stark?

What was the point of any Dems voting against Stark at all? It's not as though he was a fuck-up.

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #10)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:04 AM

11. I am saying he is not better than Stark

And I don't like cheap attempts to pander to the religious vote, but that doesn't mean he isn't a Democrat.

Before you start criticizing him for party loyalty, at least wait to see his voting record on real issues affecting the middle class.

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Response to gravity (Reply #11)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:15 AM

14. He's a former prosecutor...that's never a good sign

He'll be a big death penalty supporter and a pot prohibitionist, no doubt. Won't give a damn about civil liberties. And we can assume he'll have it in for Occupy and any activist types as well as unions, gays and feminists. All prosecutors hate all those groups.

There's no such thing as a progressive populist prosecuting attorney...those guys are all total right-wing bastards. They can't possibly be against people losing their homes due to predatory lending-nor will they ever fight Wall Street. When your attitude is "the law is the law", you're fundamentally contemptuous of the people.

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #14)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:42 AM

18. That is a cheap attack

That isn't any better than attacking on religion.

Not everything a prosecutor does is to punish the little man. Maybe he puts rapists behind bars.

Before you start criticizing people for party loyalty, have some real evidence on how they will vote on the issues. Focusing on a formal profession is just creating a straw man.

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Response to gravity (Reply #18)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:46 AM

19. Ask most rape victims how hard prosecutors try to put rapists into jail.

Last edited Tue Nov 20, 2012, 02:23 AM - Edit history (2)

Prosecutors NEVER fight for the people. And they never prosecute the rich when they steal from the poor.

We already know where this guy is headed...plus, he interned for a Blue Dog(which automatically means he can't really represent Bay Area voters).

Nobody who runs to the right of a Dem incumbent(as everyone knows this guy did) can be trusted. Neither can anybody who ever prosecuted people for minor pot offenses. If you're not for civil liberties and you have contempt for the rights of the accused(as ALL prosecutors do)you can't have any progressive views. It already goes without saying that you can't be for civil rights. Law-and-order types are always right-wing.

You can't run to the right and then be progressive in office. He'll fight for the banks. That's what being a Blue Dog means.

He's in...he's got two years...but why pretend he can be anything but a dead loss? Clearly, he only won because Republicans voted for him.

Especially when he made the "In God We Trust" thing a campaign issue. You don't do that if you're planning to fight for the people.

(on edit)I'd be glad to be proven wrong about this guy...but you've given me no reason to think that's even possible. Or to think that it's ever a good thing for a progressive Dem to be replaced by even a less-progressive one.

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #19)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 12:41 AM

20. Exactly.

 

Admiring Swalwell because of a D makes about as much sense as reviling Laguardia because of an R.

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #14)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 01:43 AM

25. DO you know those things, or are you just speculating? The Attorney General in my state,

who was a District Attorney before winning the higher office is a staunch liberal. She is just a fucking horrible campaigner, so I don't see her winning the Governor's seat and don't want to see her try to win it because I am concerned that her inept campaigning will hand that seat to republicans.

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #14)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 02:55 AM

31. Ted Kennedy and John Kerry were both Prosecutors

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Response to bottomofthehill (Reply #31)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 03:04 AM

32. And how many atheists did they go Southern Strategy on to get elected?

 

Neither of these men would ever disrespect an opponent like that. They're too busy serving their country and ALL its citizens and residents. Sound more like the sort of dirty tricks Republicans have used on Jews and Catholics to me.

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #14)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 03:14 AM

33. From his position papers, does not look to scarey to me



Equality
I support full equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. This includes the freedom to marry and the freedom to openly serve in the US military. I also support the repeal of the California’s Proposition 8 and the federal Defense of Marriage Act.

Women
I am 100% pro-choice and support the right of women to have full access to contraception and reproductive health services. I also support passage of the Violence Against Women Act and I support equal pay for equal work.

Immigration
As a prosecutor, it frustrates me that individuals who I have prosecuted that have committed serious and violent crimes – and are here without documentation – are released back into our communities after serving his or her sentence. I support removing violent, convicted criminals who are in our country without documentation. For the vast majority of undocumented individuals who work and contribute to our economy, I support a pathway to legal citizenship. I also support the Dream Act and believe it is in our economic interests (and the right thing to do) to allow children of undocumented individuals who have attended school in the US to have access, not preference, to higher education.

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #10)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:04 AM

12. Not everyone would agree

In 2003, the San Francisco Chronicle sized up Rep. Pete Stark, a California Democrat then serving out his 16th term, thusly: "Only a politician who assumes he has a job for life could behave so badly on a semi-regular basis by spewing personalized invective that might get him punched in certain East Bay taverns." That was nine years ago. But Stark, comfortably situated in a deep-blue East Bay district, really did seem to have the seat for life, affording a level of job security that allowed him to comfortably do things like threaten to throw reporters out of windows and call a female Republican colleague a "whore."

In 2011, though, California introduced a new open primary system, in which the top two finishers advance to the general election regardless of their party—which meant that, for the first time in forever, Stark faced serious competition. The result: A six-point loss on Tuesday to Alameda County prosecutor Eric Swalwell.


http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2012/11/dont-let-door-hit-you-way-out-pete-stark

Not saying I agree with the article, but saw it after the election and thought it relevant.

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Response to SpartanDem (Reply #12)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:10 AM

13. OK...doesn't surprise me that the Chronicle wouldn't like him, though.

They're an Establishment rag and feel that politicians should speak deferentially to them and their patrons in the ruling class. That Mother Jones blogger sounds like he had a score to settle, btw. Wonder what Stark did to him?

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #13)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:18 AM

15. But Mothers Jones isn't

just saying... A score? Maybe, but Stark clearly rubbed some people the wrong way.

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Response to SpartanDem (Reply #15)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:22 AM

16. I know Mother Jones isn't...that wasn't what I was saying.

That blogger was vindictive.

And it's totally weird that a blogger for a "progressive" magazine would celebrate California's adoption of an electoral system(the "top two") that clearly exists solely for the benefit of the Republican Party.

From what I've heard, Pete Stark can be abrasive...but so what? In politics, that's sometimes the only way to get things done.

Being nice too often means getting rolled. That isn't how it should be, but that's how it goes.

At least we knew Stark was on OUR side. Swalwell is a fucking PROSECUTOR...prosecutors always back the rich against the people. Being a prosecutor means you're going to be pro-death penalty, anti-civil liberties, fascist on drug laws, repressive towards activists, and contemptuous of the poor...there are no prosectors anywhere in this country that aren't extreme right-wingers. Making it your life's work to put as many people in jail as possible, no matter what, means you have to be a total bastard.

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Response to Ken Burch (Reply #16)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 01:38 AM

24. How does the California system benefit the republican party?

The system was put in place by a strongly democratic legislature. So far, it seems to have produced results that would have happened if it didn't exist. In the case of Stark versus Swawell, it ended up with democrat versus democrat in a deep blue district. The Governor's race will be interesting. If Jerry Brown gets California back on sound economic footing, he may be unbeatable, but he may have to defeat a democrat instead of a republican in the general.

If you want to elaborate more throughly on why the top two system helps republicans, I would love to read your argument. As of now, I don't see that, but I live across the country in another blue state.

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Response to bluestate10 (Reply #24)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 02:53 AM

30. Wrong.

 

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10021853779#post17

Supported by Arnold and the Chamber of Congress. Opposed by the Democrats.

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Response to gravity (Reply #6)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 01:21 AM

23. I agree, he is a democrat. Maybe Moderate-Progressive. He can be good or bad, I suspect

he will be ok if he stays at center or left of center. Most of his policy prescriptions seem to be in line with where President Obama wants to go, even Stawell's faith based literacy for parents can be good if organizations like the YMCA, YWCA, Catholic Charities and Saint Vincent De Paul carry out those initiatives. I like the idea of educated parents working with children for the elementary school years. My own mother had only a fifth grade education, but her reading the local newspaper, even haltingly and later I found out, mispronouncing some words, instilled a love for reading and learning in me.

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Response to leftlibdem420 (Original post)

Wed Nov 21, 2012, 01:06 AM

21. Look like he is a Christian blue-dog democrat.

I read his platform carefully. He talked about public investment in public education. He supports repeal of No Child Left Behind and explains why it should be repealed. He seem to despise carbon based fuels and like alternative energy, including green energy. It seems like wait and see for me, I will see how he votes on critical issues that define a democrat. If he votes poorly, the people of his district will remove him in 2014.

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