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Mon Nov 19, 2012, 05:22 PM

Any DU'ers out there, 55+ looking for a job?

A job that pays a living wage with med insurance?
How's that been working out for you?
Its been no-interview hell for me. EDD basically told me, in as many words, that I'm fucked.
I have no debt and a relatively low rent for SoCal but utilities,auto insurance, groceries and COBRA are killing us.
This is BAD. Its been almost a year and its tearing us apart.

Anyone have any advice?

98 replies, 6873 views

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Reply Any DU'ers out there, 55+ looking for a job? (Original post)
maveric56 Nov 2012 OP
trayfoot Nov 2012 #1
aletier_v Nov 2012 #75
Eleanors38 Nov 2012 #78
still_one Nov 2012 #2
Snarkoleptic Nov 2012 #65
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #81
rivegauche Nov 2012 #3
OldDem2012 Nov 2012 #4
maveric56 Nov 2012 #10
Smarmie Doofus Nov 2012 #5
LiberalEsto Nov 2012 #6
JustABozoOnThisBus Nov 2012 #7
maveric56 Nov 2012 #11
robinlynne Nov 2012 #48
MANative Nov 2012 #8
rivegauche Nov 2012 #9
MANative Nov 2012 #12
ebayfool Nov 2012 #16
MANative Nov 2012 #20
ErikJ Nov 2012 #34
Hulk Nov 2012 #58
enlightenment Nov 2012 #37
MANative Nov 2012 #59
bettyellen Nov 2012 #82
graywarrior Nov 2012 #13
maveric56 Nov 2012 #14
graywarrior Nov 2012 #15
WheelWalker Nov 2012 #47
librechik Nov 2012 #17
KatyMan Nov 2012 #92
librechik Nov 2012 #93
Melinda Nov 2012 #18
Egalitarian Thug Nov 2012 #19
2naSalit Nov 2012 #85
Egalitarian Thug Nov 2012 #87
2naSalit Nov 2012 #96
magical thyme Nov 2012 #21
geckosfeet Nov 2012 #22
Le Taz Hot Nov 2012 #41
7wo7rees Nov 2012 #62
shanti Nov 2012 #64
geckosfeet Nov 2012 #71
mrsadm Nov 2012 #23
Jim Lane Nov 2012 #24
beachgirl2365 Nov 2012 #25
maveric56 Nov 2012 #33
TexasBushwhacker Nov 2012 #68
Cartoonist Nov 2012 #26
Xipe Totec Nov 2012 #27
adieu Nov 2012 #28
ThoughtCriminal Nov 2012 #29
argiel1234 Nov 2012 #30
Le Taz Hot Nov 2012 #31
GoCubsGo Nov 2012 #42
Le Taz Hot Nov 2012 #50
GoCubsGo Nov 2012 #90
shanti Nov 2012 #66
Le Taz Hot Nov 2012 #69
Downwinder Nov 2012 #91
DonRedwood Nov 2012 #32
defacto7 Nov 2012 #35
femrap Nov 2012 #36
ErikJ Nov 2012 #38
brokechris Nov 2012 #39
Iwillnevergiveup Nov 2012 #40
ruffburr Nov 2012 #43
notadmblnd Nov 2012 #44
Dalai_1 Nov 2012 #45
Dark n Stormy Knight Nov 2012 #46
Bennyboy Nov 2012 #49
rzemanfl Nov 2012 #51
donco Nov 2012 #52
lib2DaBone Nov 2012 #53
aletier_v Nov 2012 #76
2naSalit Nov 2012 #86
99Forever Nov 2012 #89
2naSalit Nov 2012 #97
ProudProgressiveNow Nov 2012 #54
grantcart Nov 2012 #55
gadjitfreek Nov 2012 #56
jillan Nov 2012 #57
NMDemDist2 Nov 2012 #60
shanti Nov 2012 #61
bluestate10 Nov 2012 #63
Poiuyt Nov 2012 #67
vaberella Nov 2012 #70
cherish44 Nov 2012 #72
Timbuk3 Nov 2012 #73
99Forever Nov 2012 #74
CountAllVotes Nov 2012 #77
Honeycombe8 Nov 2012 #79
dflprincess Nov 2012 #80
TheKentuckian Nov 2012 #83
tilsammans Nov 2012 #84
Egalitarian Thug Nov 2012 #88
oneshooter Nov 2012 #94
Corgigal Nov 2012 #95
Xyzse Nov 2012 #98

Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 05:26 PM

1. I am looking, too.

But all I really need is a "job" - as I have had two careers. But, I am "over qualified" for the jobs I have applied to, or so they say. I am convinced that if you are over 40, you are not employable to many of these employers.

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Response to trayfoot (Reply #1)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 11:30 PM

75. Many people will lie to you

They'll tell you there's no age discrimination.

Often they've tricked themselves into believing it,
especially the younger people that discriminate against you.

The majority of them haven't developed the proper context
or decision-making skills, but they don't realize it. Some of
the interview questions are so incredibly juvenile and meaningless,
yet they read great meaning into them because that's all they know.

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Response to aletier_v (Reply #75)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 11:46 PM

78. Last 2 jobs I had they didn't bother to lie about age discrimination...

They were quite open about it.

I officially retired last year; in reality I've been retired for over 10 years (just didn't know it).

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 05:35 PM

2. I was lucky and found one back in June after working 20+ years for one company. Have you

Registered with linkedIn?

Networking or knowing someone is always your best chance of getting in the door for an interview

It depends on what job, but a good résumé is essential. Also, register with the job sites like dice.com, monster.com, indeed.com, etc.

One may need to consider contract or consulting work, and finding a good headhunter might also get you in the door for an interview

For me it was being at the right place at the right time

Flexibility and persistence is everything. Even doing volunteer work may provide a stepping stone, at least you can say that you are doing something

All the best, it is tough, good luck

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Response to still_one (Reply #2)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:43 PM

65. Linked in is a great way to see who is within a few of spheres of influence.

It's kind of like 3 degrees of Kevin Bacon (but you're the hub).

Glassdoor.com will allow you to get the skinny on prospective employers. Are employees happy, treated well, is the compensation OK, etc.

I have also used indeed.com, which is nice because it aggregates results from several other sites (you may need to use many exclusionary words to narrow the results) and you set income, location, and lots of other parameters.

If you use Monster or Careerbuilder, do a minor update to your resume one a week to keep your profile near the top of the heap. (no fancy updating is required, just add or delete a word).

Most importantly, shut down your pc and go see some people. In my job search 3 years ago, I applied for around 150 jobs online and barely received so much as a "thanks for applying". I wound up calling one of my former employees to ask if he knew anyone who was hiring and he gave me a decent gig with a company car. Kinda weird that my former employee is my boss, but it's worked out OK and kept my family afloat and insured.

Side note- my wife had a little touch of cancer in 2002, so I've been fucked around by health insurance companies requiring I prove we've never had so much as a day without coverage (else they'd not cover the preexisting condition). I've grown the hate the term "letter of creditable coverage". This gig has provided some measure of stability and sanity.

Summary- power down and beat the streets as resume "spray and pray" may not be effective in some fields.

Good luck and hang in there!

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Response to Snarkoleptic (Reply #65)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:24 AM

81. I used Glassdoor.com, indeed.com, careerbuilder, and monster.

I also got an interview and ultimately job offer from a company that a friend tipped me off on. ASK AROUND about jobs.

I also had several friends e-mailing me with jobs they'd heard about. None of them were good, but I appreciated their kindness and thoughts and wanting to help.

If I hadn't found a job in a certain length of time, I was going to check into temp work. My city is large enough to have a decent contract/temp business, so that I would at least get some money coming in, in my field. If I were lucky, maybe one of those temp jobs would be long and result in a job offer. All that's iffy, but it was something I was going to move on to, rather than stay permanently unemployed. So check into temp work. I think the longer you're unemployed, the worse it looks on your resume.

Having a temp job makes it hard to interview for a permanent job. Not sure how that works, but I thought it might be something I could work around.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 05:45 PM

3. I'm so sorry.

I wish you the very best and hope yuou get something soon. My best friend is a 57-year-old man who has worked all his life, but was laid off this past spring. He's also incredibly discouraged by the job market (here in New Mexico it's HORRIBLE.)

My only advice is what I tell him -- keep at it. The only way you'll find something is to keep applying, keep networking, keep doing all that stuff. Job fairs are a waste of your time but you might consider doing temp work, if you're in a field that uses temps. Sometimes that can lead to full-time offers.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 05:48 PM

4. I'm almost 62, and I've been out of work since 2009....

...my wife is working two jobs and we've had to do a lot of cutting in our budget.

If you can qualify for food stamps, do it. That's been the only thing that's kept us from being thrown out in the street.As far as my job search goes, it's been horrendous. I've literally sent out hundreds of resumes and have nothing to show for it.

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Response to OldDem2012 (Reply #4)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:25 PM

10. I make too much for food stamps.

Many resumes on Job services sites. Many "walk-ins", cold calls etc...

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 05:49 PM

5. No advice right now, but let's keep this thread kicked. K and R n/t

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 05:52 PM

6. Yes

I'm 60, unemployed for 4 years. We're living from paycheck to paycheck on my husband's salary. I've had 2 interviews in all this time. I suspect when they saw me, they decided I was too old for them. I've done some freelance writing gigs, but they have become harder to find in the past 2 years. I wish I had a skill other than writing, but there's no money to take classes.

My best advice: Can you find a support group? Sometimes churches have them. I was in a two-person support group for 6 months and it helped me a lot. Only another unemployed person really understands what you are going through.

Good luck!

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 05:53 PM

7. Not working out real well

What's EDD?

I've had some interviews, but I think when they see the grey hair, it's all over.

I did manage to get a short-term contract as a computer programmer, good hourly wage but no benefits (1099 contractor). I'm hoping to get another contract, as I think "real" employment is not in my future.

Single-payer "socialized" medicine would certainly relieve a lot of pressure from employees, ex-employees, and even employers. It should not be this hard.

Best of luck to you and yours.

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Response to JustABozoOnThisBus (Reply #7)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:27 PM

11. Employment Development Dept. State of CA

My $342 per week stipend.

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Response to maveric56 (Reply #11)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:16 PM

48. what is that? oh I googled. As an independednt contractor, I can't get anything

like that. would be much happier with 300 a week....
it's not a lot, but it is more than I'm earning.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:17 PM

8. To get your foot in the door...

Don't include ALL of your experience on your resume, only the last twenty years or so. That's likely the most relevant work, anyway. Don't include your year of graduation from college. Don't ever volunteer your DOB on your resume or on an application. They can't legally ask for it until you've been offered the job. Don't talk about children. Be careful of using cultural references from the '60s and '70s - even the early '80s - in conversation. If you manage to get an interview, don't wear your most conservative "business" outfit - something with just a little bit of flair gives a "younger" impression. If your hair has gone gray, consider dying it to a blond/light brown.

I know some of this may sound self-evident, but I work as a consultant in HR/Staffing, and you'd be stunned at the number of people who don't follow these really simple items. Sometimes we "know" something, but "do" something else. It's that behavioral gap which knocks people out of the running before you even get Chance One to impress them with your skill and character. Best of luck!

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Response to MANative (Reply #8)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:24 PM

9. That's really helpful, thanks.

I'm going to pass your tips along to my friend who's 57 and has had no offers.

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Response to rivegauche (Reply #9)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:27 PM

12. You're welcome - hope your friend will find them useful! n/t

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Response to MANative (Reply #8)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:39 PM

16. I really hate that - so I have to pretend I'm younger to even get a foot in the door?

I know, I get it, it's the reality of the job market now ... but it still pisses me off.

Dye your grey hair? - I earned those buggers. Good thing I'm not in that level of job seeking, the kind of jobs I get now are the kind that are somewhat reassured by the grey & the experience it implies.

I know you are offering real advice for the real now of job hunting ... not bashing you for it. It just sucks that it's what is necessary to be even considered for employment.

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Response to ebayfool (Reply #16)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:50 PM

20. It sucks entirely; there's no doubt about it.

But as you note, it is the reality of what many people need to do today to even get a chance to compete. There are a handful of roles/levels where the "grey hair" is considered an asset, but they are fewer and farther between, particularly as so many of the "gatekeepers" who determine whether you'll get that chance to compete are woefully under-qualified (and under-experienced) to make those decisions, and operate on their own understanding or perception of what "old" is. I'm fortunate that I don't look my 52 years, and have only a couple of grey hairs (thank you, Daddy, for those genes!), but when I compete for contracts in live presentations, I tend to wear trendier clothes than I normally might, and leave the first ten years of experiences off my CV or project summary.

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Response to ebayfool (Reply #16)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:44 PM

34. Chris Matthews blonde; I know a guy who had prematurely silver hair and I told him to

to dye it a blond color kind of like Chris Mathews does. So he did it and it looks great. He's going to keep it. Its not fake looking like black would be and lots of people hardly noticed the change.

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Response to ebayfool (Reply #16)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:39 PM

58. Gotta do what you gotta do...

The whole thing is so superficial anyway...so dying one's hair is no big deal in the big picture. Thank God I'm not looking for work. Been retired the last 10 years now (God, how time flies), and I just can't bring myself to think of "working for the man" any longer.

Good luck to all you job seekers out there. Do what you gotta do to survive! Get your nest egg, grab your Social Security pension and head down here to Mexico or further. Life is good, and you can find the 1950's speed in the 21st century world right here in the middle of heaven.

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Response to MANative (Reply #8)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:48 PM

37. Be careful with this advice.

I know you're in the field, but I've discovered that more and more companies are using private services, like HireRight, to do background checks on potential employees. Leaving off information like year of graduation can cause a red-flag - and all the potential employer sees is that flag. They don't much care why it is there; there are plenty of fish in the pond they are fishing.

I'll say this, also - your suggestion to try and look younger is not really logical. You say that a potential employee has one chance to "impress them with your skill and character" and at the same time suggest that they pretend to be something they are not. They should try and pass themselves off as a younger person. It's clear you're trying to help, but what does age have to do with skill and character? As an HR consultant, are you taken in by someone who attempts to hide their age? What does it suggest to you about that person's character if they attempt to obfuscate?

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Response to enlightenment (Reply #37)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:55 PM

59. The background checks are typically done...

well after someone enters the process, and cannot legally be done without consent. Simply applying for a position is not sufficient "implied consent" in most states, although I am not familiar with the specific laws on this in every state. In the states where I work most often, an applicant must sign a specific consent document for these checks to be conducted.

All I'm talking about is getting through the door. I'm not saying any of this is logical; it's just the way it is. I've been doing work in this field for nearly 30 years and much of it is illogical and "gut feeling" on the part of individuals who have little or no training in how to actually evaluate skill and behavior. Age has no direct correlation with any of that, and discrimination based on age (too
"old" or too "young") is ridiculous (not to mention illegal). Good luck, however, getting a case to be heard or decided in your favor. I believe it's the most common and least "respected" form of hiring discrimination. I'm not "taken in" by anything of the sort, but I'm on the other side of the equation. I teach people to accurately evaluate skill and behavior with sets of behavioral constructs using a detailed question-based and observational analysis. However, if someone can't even get in the door, they can't get to the point of evaluation. However distasteful it may be, it's what's going on in the hiring world today.

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Response to enlightenment (Reply #37)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:57 AM

82. It's about not letting them put you in a box, appearing active, vibrant and in touch with the times

Looking like you take care of yourself, and are conscious of how others perceive things. And So many job applicants screw up by showing up late, calling for directions, exposing butt crack and wearing baseball caps, looking like sad sacks or staring at their smart phones. Yeah, people of all ages do need lessons in what not to do or wear!

In a tough economy, many really don't want anybody that doesn't "fit in" to their workplace.
I freelanced for years, and learned to be a bit of a chameleon and edit out or push certain skills and job experience depending on the job offered. I had at least 20 versions of my resume at any given time. I researched companies and used their buzzwords and job ads phraseology in my resume and cover letters. People are blown away when you present as exactly what they are looking for. I don't think you have to be phony young, but a positive enthusiastic open minded outlook and great grooming helps allay their fears immensely. And no one in their fifties needs to putting 30 year old jobs or diplomas out there to be shot down. Pragmatically, you have to make age a non-issue as much as you can.

Everyone embarking on a job search some very basic versatile but stylish clothes that made them look together and professional. It's not a horrible trade off for a job, many places have ridiculously relaxed dress codes these days.
I learned to project both intelligence and an easier going persona (make them less intimidated by your experience) because I had learned the hard way how much people value that team player shit.

What ageists are afraid of is cranky, judgmental, entitled and out of touch people who are stuck in the mud. If you have any of those traits, hide them... and keep them hidden around coworkers.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:29 PM

13. I work for this agency. Call their 800 number to see if they are avail in CA

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Response to graywarrior (Reply #13)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:32 PM

14. Thank you so much.

I'll check them out now.

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Response to maveric56 (Reply #14)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:38 PM

15. Let me know because if they don't service that area, I can ask my HQ

what's available in your area.

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Response to maveric56 (Reply #14)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:15 PM

47. I'm in the SCSEP program here in Oregon. Living the Dream.

Placed as a groundskeeper in my little village. It's not much, but better than a poke in the eye. Twenty hours a week at our state minimum wage of $8.80. It definitely helps, but it is a training position, not actual employment. There are no benefits and they don't even pay into unemployment insurance. They do cover workers' comp. You have to meet eligibility which means you've got to be pretty darn destitute. The idea is to get you placed in a host agency that will bring you on in a real position, but that won't necessarily be full time with benefits.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:43 PM

17. get a nurse's aid certificate.

They are still hiring people your age to sit with elderly folks, take care of meals etc. It's an easy certificate to get, and cheap. Or try the local hospitals. They all need transporters and so much more. Many of them have their own in-house training programs.

I know it's not what you are trained for, but if you need ANY job, helping care for the sick and elderly jobs are plentiful, everywhere and harm no one. Sometimes you get health care benes too.

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Response to librechik (Reply #17)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 09:21 AM

92. even better

enroll in a one year vocational nurse (LVN or LPN) and your salary and job prospects will increase. There are a lot of two year degrees that work in the healthcare sector- respiratory therapist; RN; physical therapist assistant, etc. They offer a good return on the 1 or 2 year investment. Many of these programs are offered at night and/or weekends.

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Response to KatyMan (Reply #92)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 09:54 AM

93. yes, indeed--my daughter started with the CNA, and she's going to school in January

for something more advanced, using the CNA in the meantime.TheHealth industry is desparate for workers, not just in the US but everywhere.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:43 PM

18. Title V provides Senior Community Service Employment Program in all 50 states

Check your local counties Commission on Aging, or other county Aging agency. This service provides part-time employment to seniors 55 and over with the ultimate goal of finding the applicant long term full time employment. There are certain limitations, ie; income cap for eligibility, but one won't know till one finds out the specifics. I also know that AARP runs a nationwide title V program too, as well as other non-profits. I hope this helps - good luck.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 06:47 PM

19. I'm sorry, I wish I could give you some good news.

 

How I've squeaked by for the last 9 years was to just drop out from the system entirely. I have several salable skills and work as I am able for cash. If you're over 40 it is extremely difficult and when you're over 50 you're invisible. NLRB and EEOC are absolutely useless. And even the President has not uttered a word about what is being done to us.

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Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #19)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 02:32 AM

85. That's pretty much

where I've been though I can't work for cash as I would be liable for taxes and I don't want that as a bill, I'd rather not see it in the first place since everything goes to keeping a roof over my head and bare necessities. Healthcare is not an option so I learned to make a lot of things on my own and just take care of myself. Those include pain relieving slave, skin moisturizer/healing salve or lotion and I watch out for activities where I might get hurt and avoid those... but I do exercise. And I have a rather spartan diet that does not include anything that isn't really healthy and nutrient dense.

I sold everything almost ten years ago as the sept 11 event threw me into a pit of unemployment and near homelessness more than once. Now I rent in a very small dwelling and work seasonal jobs when they are available, but haven't had insurance, except on my ancient vehicle, since I can't remember when. And I went to college, kind of late in life, to avoid this very situation... didn't work out like I planned as I graduated a month before sept. 11.

I wish anyone looking the best of luck but I wonder of we even have a chance. I live in a rural state and unless you have a state or federal job or won a business, it's slavish labor or nothing. I'd like to start a business but getting backing impossible it seems... been trying for years. Something needs to change in a big way regarding our ability to provide for ourselves.

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Response to 2naSalit (Reply #85)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 07:21 AM

87. What do/did you do? n/t

 

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Response to Egalitarian Thug (Reply #87)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:41 PM

96. Well...

I was a graphic artist, musician and truck driver for a long time until I had my third injury event and then I decided I needed a real edumacation so I started that in my mid 30s. As a 9th grade dropout, it took some remedial classes to get up to snuff for college writing and math. But I did it, was ready to pull my hair out a few times but came out with a graduate degree too. But that was in 8/01. I had a couple possibilities and one that I was negotiating... a sweet position doing exactly what I had in mind with a notable organization for a great wage and benes... could have paid off my loans in 24 months... and it evaporated into thin air two weeks after 9/11. Everything else that came up thereafter went from positions that paid $60K+ down into the low $20Ks, if I could get them... not. That went on for over three years, I had had enough and was in my late forties by then.

I tried to wait out the first bu$h term by going after another graduate degree to increase my marketability but by then the corporate world was controling what you could study and you had to have $$ backing you up when you walked through the door so that didn't work out either. After a couple semesters of that nonsense and a heavy case of depression I decided to just sell my world and moved to my study area since there are tourism towns surrounding it, at least I can make beds, wait tables, run a cash register, work in catering and operate heavy equipment to have food and shelter. I don't like lots of modern things and I was actually happy to not have a phone or computer for a couple years, it helped me reconnect to the natural world that I know best and love most. Now I have most of what I need to live and stay healthy but I don't have a job as I am healing up from the back injury I got this summer thanks to public safety net that is oh so temporary. I'll have to find work next season but the job creators here know I'm a good worker as I do my job and show up when I am supposed to.

So for many of us the pipe dream of a rather care-free retirement was never really an option as I have come to realize. (It's just TeeVee propaganda to keep us on the corporate treadmill for someone else's profit and our expense.) The best we can do is all we can do, and to come to the realization that uncomplicating our lives and accepting some simpler options are probably best. Besides, I don't feed the corporate beast much as I keep my transactions on a local level, the nearest city is over 100 miles away so I go there twice a year and get what I need in bulk and get immediate perishables in the town nearby as needed. Don't need the latest fashions or gadgets and that suits me just fine as it greatly reduces the stress level. That's what I know and I'm going with it since there really aren't any other realistic options that I can see. I am too old to compete with the younger generations and would have far less than acceptable living accommodations at a higher price elsewhere. If I need something, I deal with it the old fashioned way, I save up for it.

As far as continuing to smash my head against the wall looking for an elusive career, why bother? I've been out of the "loop" for so long that nobody would even give me a second look. I had two file drawers of job search related stuff, twenty resume versions, application (copies of), rejection notices etc... I shredded it and moved on knowing it wasn't meant to be. I even sold my professional wardrobe. Sure I cried at first but I got over that too.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:12 PM

21. I was laid off a few months after 9/11 at age 48

I've been more out than in work since then. I'm 59 now. I've burned through all my savings except I own my home outright, so I still have that.

I went back to school for allied health care back in '08 and ended up with a big chunk of school loans. I also found a sucky part time job while in school with a finance company that had moved to Maine to get cheap US labor. I left that job after a year, since the clinical training part of the health care program was full-time plus and 2-3 hour commute.

Health care has been per diem, no benefits at all (not even per diem differential), at a lab chain that pays $3/hour less than other area hospital labs, and horrible management - it makes the sucky job seem heavenly since that only sucks during 5-6 months of tax season and then is actually kind of fun.

Anyway, I just got hired back at former sucky job, which will be full time for 6-8 weeks of training, and then 3 days/week. I will work per diem at the lab weekends only to flesh out the income. While I was away, they had major housecleaning, which included walking my evil manager out the door and since it involved QC issues, I'm hoping also included firing her crony who stole my IRA docs and trumped up false charges against me when she was trying to get me fired so she could shoehorn her newly divorced sister into my job.

Knowing what I know about the prior sucky job, I expect I'll be able to turn it into full time by next year's tax season. If not, at least it will give the lab a chance for the housecleaning *they* need to do. Right now they are protecting a semi-deadbeat porn addict, but he's become increasingly brazen. No longer hiding in blood bank, I saw him right out front in hematology staring at female genitals on his computer. It's just a matter of time before the impatient ER doc or an OR doc with emergency body fluid comes running to him and gets an eyeful. That complaint will go a long way to getting this lab chain in trouble. At least I hope it will.

No benefits at this point, but will have them with the part time job. Just not a living wage part time, although combined with the lab hopefully will be.

Oh, in my former life I worked in high tech marketing communications for nearly 20 years and made about 5x what I make now.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:18 PM

22. Try temping, agency work or contracting. Or - start your own business.

A simple delivery service is a good place to start.

A quick one or two page website and you're off.

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Response to geckosfeet (Reply #22)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:53 PM

41. I have top secretarial skills

and have had to rely on temp agencies from time to time throughout my working career. Any other time I worked temp. my phone never stopped ringing and almost every employer I worked for wanted to hire me on the spot. I walked into a temp agency this last summer. Aced all their tests (I type 85 wpm). They pigeon-holed me into a Receptionist rank and NEVER called. Not once. It's not hard to figure out why.

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Response to geckosfeet (Reply #22)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:32 PM

62. I like your idea of starting your own business.

I recruit seniors for that reason. It's not as expensive as you think. PM me for my offer. (You can always say no.)

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Response to geckosfeet (Reply #22)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:40 PM

64. hmm, that sounds interesting

i'm looking for some kind of business that i can start out of my home. what kind of deliveries are you referring to?

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Response to shanti (Reply #64)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 10:07 PM

71. Any kind you can swing. Courrier. Pizza. Florist. Auto parts. Groceries.

Something you have an interest in? Does not have to be fancy - just fill a need and advertise a little.

Not to say there are no expenses associated with this - insurance, gas, maintenance etc. But it's a business. You always have those untidy details to attend to.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:25 PM

23. Wow I feel for you

I was laid off from a high tech job at age 57. Was required to train my replacement in China.

I was able to get freelance work through friends and contacts in my hobby area. I would highly recommend contacting everyone you know; offer to work part time; volunteer for free for a while so potential employers/clients can see the quality of your work.

I think personal contacts matter more than anything.
As someone once told me, the opposite of networking is not working.
Good luck!!

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:26 PM

24. I've been getting by, barely, with freelance work.

I have much less income but at least I have more free time.

Try to keep your IRA funded. If you have to declare bankruptcy they can't touch that.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:30 PM

25. What are your job skills?

 

Hi Maverick,
I am sorry to hear about your struggles......I don't mean to be a dunce, but what are your job skills?, ................your background in? I don't have the power to make the final hiring decisions, but the majority of our sales and computer developers/programmers work remotely. (I work for a software company) I would be happy to forward your resume to our different department heads to see if there is a possible fit........pls attach your resume to your response if you are possibly interested. Best of luck to you.

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Response to beachgirl2365 (Reply #25)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:43 PM

33. Maritime engineering (US Naval ships in san diego)

I'm non-degreed and worked my way up from shipboard install/fabricator, to Shipboard Superintendant. A back injury took me off my tools and into Drafting/design for ship habitability. Thats basically shipboard furniture and HVAC (ventilation systems). I learned a design software called SolidWorks where I design and draw up items used aboard Naval warships. Learned all the DOD/USN specs, and with my hands-on experience became an "engineer" w/o a degree.
I was smarter than my dumbass supervisor and after 6 years with the company I was let go because I'm "Old School".
Go figure.

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Response to maveric56 (Reply #33)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:54 PM

68. Are you willing to relocate? Could your skills transfer to designing things for drilling rigs

or oil tankers? The oil industry is very busy right now and Houston has a very low cost of living.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:31 PM

26. heres one

its a lousy job i know because i had to settle for it
im 58
do you have a truck or van
golden state overnight is always looking for delivery drivers
its not as good as ups but it does have health insurance which is essential for us old timers

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:32 PM

27. Not at the moment, thought I'm always on the ragged edge...

It seems the older I get, the harder it is to hold on to a job, and the harder it is to find the next one.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:33 PM

28. Similar boat as you

Yes, individually, we're fucked. But, if we join together and work together on some project, accept and trust each other, we can achieve something successful and then, people will listen. PM me and let's get something started. Anyone else want to join in are invited.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:36 PM

29. I got lucky

54 actually. I just happened to be in the right place at the right time - which is good because nobody else called. It was the only job I interviewed for.

I'm not sure if there is any non-obvious advise that can help. Being able to sell skills that are not obvious from your job history seems to help. I also found that rare place, where a little extra maturity was sought.

I made a substantial career change after a divorce - from programming to IT. Much lower pay than I was used to, but it's a a little better than a living wage. Retirement and health benefits are better than I had.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:38 PM

30. dont know what to offer but best wishes

 

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:39 PM

31. This over 55 DUer has been out of work

for 3 years. Husband's been out for 4. No work in sight. Four college degrees between the 2 of us, scads of experience in several fields and, before 2005, a very good, steady work history. We've had some intermittent employment but it's hard going from $125.00 an hour to $11.25 an hour.

I can't offer you any advice but I can certainly lend a sympathetic ear. There are MILLIONS of us in the same boat. It's a story that isn't being told and desperately needs to be.

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Response to Le Taz Hot (Reply #31)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:56 PM

42. I'm one of those millions in the same boat.

It'll be a few years before I hit 55, but it's the same damn thing for those in our late 40s to early 50s. I thought I was seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. I applied for a job recently that was IDENTICAL to the one I was in for 20 years. The research was a little different, but I don't think there are many people in my field with the experience I have. I thought I was a shoe-in, especially since the person doing the hiring told me, as well as all my references, that I was a "strong candidate". Well, I checked my e-mail at lunch today, and there was an e-mail from this person. I thought, "Oh look! She wants to arrange for an interview!" Then I opened it, only to find that the position was filled. She didn't even give the courtesy of a fucking interview AFTER telling me I was a "strong" candidate. It's been like this for five goddamn years. I am so fucking sick of this shit, I can't take it any more.

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Response to GoCubsGo (Reply #42)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:17 PM

50. On the rare occasion that we do get an actual interview,

the HR manager is maybe 25, takes one look at you and you can see it in their eyes. "You're too old." You go through the kabuki theater that is the interview -- sometimes lasting as long as 15 minutes -- a handshake, "It was a pleasure meeting you" and if you're lucky, you get the "we've chosen another candidate" letter. More often than not, you don't even get that.

My husband's been doing contracts work but it's always hit/miss if/when they're going to pay. I just had a crying jag about a half hour ago about a check that was supposed to be in LAST Monday but never came in and the party responsible seems to always be out of the office. Not only is that check scheduled for bills, it's our Thanksgiving dinner. (This one has a happy ending -- as I was going through my "I'm so sick of this shit" tantrum, the phone call came in and husband's on his way to pick up the check.)

My friend, PLEASE know that you are not alone and PLEASE feel free to PM me at anytime. If nothing else, we can commiserate together.

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Response to Le Taz Hot (Reply #50)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 09:09 AM

90. Most of my interviews have been over the phone.

So, they don't know what I look like. But, there is no getting away from age. Many of the jobs for which I apply have electronic applications that require you put down the years you get your degrees. There is also the Google search, where they'll see publications with my name on them that are 20 years old or more. It's not hard to do the math...

As for the in-house interviews, I usually wind up having to pass on those. Just got the opportunity for one last week. But, as usual, it would require travel halfway across the country on my own dime. Since I'm broke, I can't afford the chance to get a job. How fucked up is that?

And, I know what you mean about not even getting a reject letter or phone call. Half the time they don't even acknowledge receiving your application. I could go on for days with the horror stories, but I'm sure you and others "Been there, done that.", too. You are welcome to PM me, as well. It really DOES help knowing that you aren't alone. And, one for your husband.

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Response to Le Taz Hot (Reply #31)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:45 PM

66. you're a boomer, right?

it seems like the boomers have been screwed with coming and going! when we were applying for jobs as younger people, there was that logjam of boomers, which made finding a good job difficult. it's still there apparently!

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Response to shanti (Reply #66)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:56 PM

69. Yep!

When I was first starting in the work force I was "too young." Now I'm "too old." The frustrating thing is we're "old school" and know what a work ethic is. We don't sit on Facebook or Twitter all day, we're not texting our friends when we should be working, we get to work early and are willing to stay late if necessary, we're willing to go outside our job description to do what needs to be done and we're the ones LEAST likely to be drawn into office drama. In fact, we're the calming force.

I also find it more than a coincidence that the economic collapse happened JUST BEFORE the oldest boomers started to retire. Pensions wiped out. Life savings wiped out. Investments wiped out. And no time to recover even if there WERE jobs available to us. How convenient.

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Response to Le Taz Hot (Reply #31)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 09:15 AM

91. +1

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:39 PM

32. kick

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:48 PM

35. Big K&R

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:48 PM

36. Drop Cobra...

 

get a high deductible policy or go without if you are healthy. Get just the basic car insurance. Shop for food at Aldi's.

Sell some of your stuff...yard sale or consignment.

I'm so sorry. I'm 60, but in OH so prices are less but no one wants to hire me. I am just waiting for the new Mayan beginning next month. If that doesn't happen, and things get real bad, I have a reservation at a unisex planet!

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:49 PM

38. 3rd world living.

English tutoring is in high demand worldwide. The pay isnt great but the living is extremely cheap in lots of those countries. I heard of a woman who is a writer and her monthly expenses are $250 a month. With the internet, writers can live almost anywhere in the world. Lots of these countries have free or very cheap healthcare as well.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:49 PM

39. bookmarking

I am only a few short years younger than you--and long term unemployed in Northern California.

This thread has some great advice!

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 07:53 PM

40. Even though it can be rough

retail might be a way to go temporarily at this time of the year. Stores take on extra help during the Christmas season.

Volunteering might land you something, too. Do you know any teachers? Schools in CA are notoriously understaffed for playground supervisors, cafeteria aides, street-crossers, indoor and outdoor maintenance work. If you know one teacher in an elementary school, perhaps ask her if you can come in and read a story at a regularly scheduled time. The word would spread, believe me, and other teachers would bite at the chance for you to come into their classrooms. Or if you have artistic talent, perhaps schedule a time to do a project. Classes might actually get grouped, and you have the kids on your side who would want you to come back.

Libraries are another possibility. But make it clear that if you get your foot in the door, you are volunteering while LOOKING FOR SOMETHING PERMANENT.

I have a feeling we'll be hearing some good news from you very soon. GOOD LUCK!

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:02 PM

43. I don't advise this-

I was in the same boat ,Still am for that matter, To make a long story short , The stress of this situation put me into heart failure not once not twice but four times, All I'm saying is if you can stay mellow don't let it grind on you like i did

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:09 PM

44. I've been cleaning houses.

I earn 13 hr plus mileage @ .50 a mile. I work between 25 and 30 hrs a week. The lady I work for 1099s us so I'm making about $500.00 a week cash. It's hard work, but it's paying the bills right now. I'll be 54 in January and one more year til I get my pension ( I have 28 years working for an IT company). I've had 4 or 5 interviews this year, but you are right, at this age no one wants to give you a chance. Starting salaries are now less than what I currently bring home, so I'm thinking- after the first of the year, starting my own cleaning service business.

I've learned a lot from the lady I've been working for. Mainly what she is doing wrong. I know what prices to charge now plus I have discovered that I am very good with her clients. So much so that people request me. If I were an unethical person, I could probably steal about 6 now. I've got one reqular client on my own now and I do get occasional side job so after the Christmas season (gott stay or the EOY tips), I'm gonna get some brochures, flyers and business cards made up, advertise on Craigslist and get this going. My sister said she will help. I figure 10 houses a week (2 a day M-F) will provide us both (we live together) with a wage we can get by on.

Maybe you can try something like that?

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:10 PM

45. +1

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:12 PM

46. K & R. Very important topic.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:16 PM

49. Buy a franchise?

 

Start your won business? That's me. I gave up long ago. Now I am a care giver. Look inot that In Home Caregiver through the state.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:18 PM

51. I'm 65 with three degrees. Things got so bad at work that

I just walked out one morning. I am collecting unemployment (they agreed I no choice but to quit) and have been for over a year although that will end at the end of 2012 unless Congress extends it. I have a pension and Social Security but intended to work a few more years. The unemployment is reduced by my pension, so it isn't much. The jobs I have interviewed for paid little and had no benefits.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:20 PM

52. UPS Is hiring

for the Holiday rush.Not much but it'll tide you over for a few.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:22 PM

53. Yes, if you are 55 or over......

 

If you are 55 or over.. you are not wanted by any business.

They can't come right out and tell you because it is age discrimination.

They are afraid if you are over 55, that you are going to drive up their health insurance.

I have filled out thousands of applications... al the same.

You are not wanted if over 55. And best of all.. Congress is talking about raising the retirement age to 70!

I have arthritis very bad.... and I will be dragging myself thru the employment line...while our politicians revel in free health care, free gyms, free limo, 4 weeks or more vacation....

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Response to lib2DaBone (Reply #53)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 11:37 PM

76. Yup. It's a hard unpleasant truth when you stumble into it.

It took me a couple of years to believe it.

It's the modern-day version of Nazi Germany,
but instead of actively hauling off Jews and killing them,
now it's about letting people die off through lack of income,
and looking the other way, hoping not to see it.

I'm actually doing fairly well, all things considered,
I'm only 5% off my peak income but careerwise I'm done.

I think a lot about suicide,
which sounds depressing and scary,
but the truth is that the situation sucks,
jobs suck, the general culture sucks, women suck,
so for me, there's no really a lot left I want to do.

I can't see playing pool for ten hours a day,
and even if I could, I don't have the savings
to survive another two years of unemployment.

I really don't care much anymore,
once you see the truth about the people around you,
it's hard to work much enthusiasm for the future.

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Response to aletier_v (Reply #76)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 03:27 AM

86. It's a form of

self deportation for those of us who are citizens.

I can relate, have been to the suicide edge of the cliff a number of times since 2001 when it all started for me. It's hard and I found that moving to a small tourist town was the survival mode for me. Tourism has its good points as you can at least find work if you're willing/able to in most cases and multi-talent is welcomed... I have lots of skills but am finding it hard to get work, especially now because my last job of 15 months hurt my back one day and I have been arguing with worker's comp just to get a set of ex-rays and that took 4 months and I got them because I also applied for Soc. Sec at the same time. I knew that jobs that require lifting were no longer and option and needed documentation to keep the state from harassing me about why I wouldn't take certain jobs when they were offered. I have two degrees and a long history of working at many things, but none of it seems to matter.

So how do I stay sane and not jump off a cliff? I calmed down and started to meditate, again. It does things and all I can say is that once I calmed down from total freak out about losing my spartan housing, things started to work for me, not big but sufficient for me to have shelter and food, and eventually my back issues resolved, even though I had to get a lawyer.

So, if you are at the end of your self preservation, I suggest that you try to reconnect with your life force by whatever means, a religion or a belief system or simply finding a comfortable for you method of meditation, it really does change the energy around you so that you can survive your situation without going batshit crazy. Since I live in a rural place, I also have the blessing of wildlife and a place to go for solitude, just outside of the small town I live in, and that makes a lot of difference for me being the outdoorsy type... and in most cases, if something didn't get done today, it's probably okay if it gets done tomorrow instead. I sold everything but my car, my kitchen essentials, some bedding, essential clothing and my artwork, it all fits in my vehicle in two trips and I have it all in my tiny hovel. It's real survival mode but I don't need a lot of stuff... after a couple years I got another computer and a phone. My stress level is usually pretty low and I stopped having migraines. I figured back then that it wasn't going to get any better so I decided to just bail and be happy instead. For the most part that's what I've had until I hurt my back, but since it's going to heal eventually and it's a WC issue, I am actually going to survive this too, though I have less money and I might not be able to buy new boots this winter, I'll make it anyway. When I'm better, it'll be back to the seasonal stuff with no benes except the natural life around me, that is enough... and I am thankful to have it.

Cheer up, life will get better if you will it to be... even though it might be a bit different than you may have imagined.

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Response to aletier_v (Reply #76)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 08:37 AM

89. I see much of myself in your words.

I'm invisible to the world. Headed towards homelessness and our all knowing "leaders" don't even pretend that people like me matter. If I died today, no one would notice outside my family and I'm guessing it would likely be a relief to them. 2 interviews with 1 outfit (a freakin' oil changing chain) that went nowhere since 2008. The effects of the beatdown on ones self-worth is hard to describe.

And here comes the "holidays" to rub my nose in the fact that I can't afford to be a part of them AGAIN.

I want out.

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Response to 99Forever (Reply #89)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 02:38 PM

97. What I discovered

is that the holidays can be better if the element of capitalism is diminished. My family gets it from my end. Sometimes I send some of them something but usually just TELLING them that I love them and that they mean a great deal to me is enough, and they have learned that I am better off for that perspective... and most have adopted my values on that level.

I go through the degrading feelings from time to time but when I step back and look at what I can do sans the faux peer pressure that is reinforced by the media and advertising, I find I don't need a lot of material stuff and feel good about it. Having lots of things can drive you crazy worrying about how to keep and protect it all. I also realized that some of my prized antiques etc. would be kept better by someone else who had a more secure life. If I valued them as much as I claimed, I decided that they would be safer with someone else and I could use the cash they would render.

I don't have to own everything I like or value.

Our society, dictated to by the corporate persons, has been conditioned to believe that we "need" to have a lot of shit that is just rubbish and ends up cluttering up our lives or filling up a landfill somewhere. Once you can free yourself of that mindset, you can find that a happier, less stressful existence is possible and you can have that too. You have to free your mind from the shackles of the corporate version of what you can have and be rather than be addicted to their latest BS that disses you and goads you into doing their bidding instead of taking care of yourself and your family and friends.

Once I did that, I stopped having debilitating migraines (that can cost $1Ks per episode), panic attacks and serious depression. It feels a little insecure at first but in reality it's much better for you on all levels. I recycle clothes at the clothing bank or yard sales though I buy new underwear and shoes, and I do the same with furniture and other stuff I want... it's either free or pretty inexpensive. We have been conditioned to be intolerant of anything that doesn't feed the jones for convenience and instant gratification by owning the latest thing. Break the chains and be free of that burden, it makes a huge difference in your quality of life and your sense of self worth. It helps you learn to love yourself without the weight of the TeeVee overseers telling you that you suck because you don't want/choose to stay on the treadmill to nowhere.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:27 PM

54. K&R nt

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:29 PM

55. find a support group, remain positive.


keep fighting.

When I was transitioning about a decade ago I read alot about success of networking and found one large statistical survey that very few jobs came from your immediate circle of friends and associates.

It detailed that the most successful networking when you went to the second level of friends of friends. It turns out that your friends and close circle share most of the same job markets and contacts. Its the next level of associates that take you into areas that you would not normally go to that is the most productive.

Call up a friend, make an appointment and tell him, "I need your help" people respond to that simple sentence. Tell him that you know that he problably doesn't have tips on jobs but ask him to give you the names of 3 friends of his who are good guys in other fields. You want to go to talk to them, not about getting help in getting a job but asking their advice on how to get in their industry.
You will be surprised.

Finally get mobile. After living in San Diego for 15 years moved to Tucson for business reasons. Twice the income at half of the cost. Guess what? Tucson has everything that San Diego has except the ocean and the traffic jams. We can go anywhere in 20 minutes. You may have to go somewhere else, but you may end up liking it better than you thought. Who knew that Arizona would elect 5 Dems and only 4 Reps to Congress this year.


good luck and never give up.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:30 PM

56. I'm 46 and employed as a teacher, but...

...should I ever lose my job (and with the way things are going public education may be coming to an end) I'm screwed. I am a world-famous teacher who has won awards for teaching but there's no way anyone would hire me. I have too much experience and command to high a salary. If I lost my job and health insurance I'd be dead within a year thanks to a giant pituitary tumor that I had removed but makes it necessary to take a lot of medications I'd never be able to afford without insurance. If I can make it through the next 9 years I'll have a decent pension and I'm all set but I'm walking on eggshells and things are only going from bad to worse in the ed biz. Some of that is on Obama and his dipshit Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and his misbegotten Race To The Top bullshit. If the public really knew what was going on there would be quite an uproar.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 08:31 PM

57. Sell on Ebay - no, you don't get insurance - but...

you can make some money. And it will help you stay afloat while you are looking for another job. I couldn't get by without the extra income I get by selling. I made 11,000 last year AFTER all expenses, doing it part-time. Not great money, but nothing to sneeze at either.

You have to figure out what to sell, but once you do, you can take off.
You have to look at an item and see how much you can "flip it for". But do not buy alot until you get the hang of it & figure out what sells.
I threw away $100 when I got started, but now - I get it! I know what to buy, what sells & where to find it.

Just a thought

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:22 PM

60. federal gov't hires us old folk

an if you ever served in the military it gives you a leg up, esp if you're vietnam era

www.usajobs.gov

and don't be afraid to give them a 6-10 page resume. read the questions for the job carefully and then make sure your resume shows those skills and be sure to delineate how long you did the skill and how often

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:27 PM

61. my bro

who's 53, and an ex-roofer from so cal, was having quite a time finding a job until he decided to take a truck driving course and be a trucker. there's no way his body would hold out as a roofer at his age, so he decided to do something a person of any age could do - drive. it's not for everyone, but he says he can make about 85K after he has about 2 years in.

tried the state or feds?

i myself am 57 and would like a part time job, but cannot find one. i'm retired from the state, so medical insurance is not an issue, as i have full coverage.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:39 PM

63. You may try re-training. Health care jobs are supposed to be in high demand, plus the

government may help foot the bill. Better to stay with a 2 year program or less.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:53 PM

67. If I were looking, I'd dye my hair and lie on my resume. Seriously

What are they going to do? Fire you? You'd be no worse off. Dumb down your resume so you can get something.

Right now, I have a part time job and I'm grateful for what I have.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 10:04 PM

70. I'm not 55 or over or even in that vicinity yet. But Kick Against Agism!!!

I hope you get a job soon.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 10:27 PM

72. I'm 45 and part time employee and looking for a job with health insurance

I probably apply for 2-3 jobs a week. Not one call for an interview. I may just leave off the year I graduated from college and some of my older jobs from my resume and see if that makes a difference. Looks-wise I could probably still pass for mid to late 30s so we'll see.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 11:00 PM

73. I'm 55

I was laid off nearly 3 years ago.

I saw the layoff coming and had applied for a job, which I was assured I would get, at an employer that hires at a glacial pace. I spent a year on unemployment, waiting, but finally the promise came through.

Now, I have to keep paying my mortgage in one town while holding an EXPENSIVE apartment in an EXPENSIVE town. I see my wife, who works every other weekend, a few hours a month. I'm going backwards, financially, but about $300/month, but that doesn't take into account my 401(k) contributions, so we're probably getting ahead a few hundred/month.

The Bush recession hurt college grads, and I don't want to understate the damage it did to people in their 20s, but the cruelty of the corps in cutting loose men in their 50s is difficult to overstate. Men and women who had worked for decades to earn their benefits; medical insurance when they're getting to the years where they need it, more vacation time than a new hire, higher wages, were left to fend for themselves in a rotten job market that had little value for experience. "It's better to hire the young guy, pay him less, give him less time off, and he's not as likely to get sick."

Years ago I read a book (How To Argue And Win Every Time) by Gerry Spence, the Jackson attorney who prosecuted the famous "Pintos explode when hit from the rear" case. He proved that Ford did a calculation and came to the conclusion that it was less expensive to settle a few wrongful death lawsuits than to recall all those Pintos.

Their decision was to let people die because they made more money that way.

Until America wraps it's stupid head around the fact that corporations aren't "people", they're not even the CEO, or the workers, or the board, they're legal constructs whose sole purpose is to increase the bottom line, we'll continue to suffer.

The question is, would you rather be governed by a government who you had a voice in electing, or a soulless legal construct designed to make money FOR ITSELF?

OK, a bit of a rant. I wish you well in your job search, and you have my sympathies (although I hope you have better luck than I did, even though I'm grateful I found SOMETHING.) But the main message is, you're not alone.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 11:20 PM

74. K&R L

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 11:44 PM

77. dying the hair works


I'm not into it but I recently had my hair dyed for a trip I went on. No one can tell I had it dyed and it took 10 years off of me real fast. It wasn't all grey but I had quite a few of them and I look young for my age I am told (am in my late 50's).

With the dye job I can pass for 40.

Dye, yep, it works! Never thought I'd say that!

I wish you the best!



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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:10 AM

79. Earlier this yr was unemployed for a month. Got a job. I'm 58.

With med. insurance, but I have to pay $100 a month for it.

I thought my age would be a hindrance. I suspect it was. I came close to getting a super job, but ultimately they went with person #2. I suspect it was my age. BUT I got 2 job offers. One wasn't good at all....low pay, no 401k contribution, so-so ins. The 2nd one was better.

I spoke with my employment agent about the age thing, before I started interviewing. I was employed when I started. Then became unemployed. What she told me about the age thing is...she places people in their 50s all the time. It depends on the things that we all think of, when someone applies for a job: job history, references, personality, looking healthy and vibrant and energetic, being positive, having a good resume, interviewing well..

She said she did have some people who were laid off a couple of years ago who still were unemployed, but she said there were other reasons besides age they didn't find employment. She gave an example of one woman who didn't dress appropriately for an interview, and also, was very overweight and walked and looked like she was unhealthy, AND mentioned her back problems.

I was very depressed when I was unemployed. Also from the circumstances that led to my quitting my job (yes, I QUIT my job; I wasn't fired....long story...couldn't take it anymore, AND I had a lot of $ saved up and low expenses). What I did:

I worked at getting a job, like it was a job. I did something every day. I applied online, I called an agency, I looked at ads online.

I was already on www.linkedin.com. Very important. I saw that two people who had interviewed me had looked me up on Linkedin. Put all your skills, etc. And get some people as your connections on there.

FACEBOOK AND SOCIAL NETWORKS. I hope you aren't on there with your real name. They will look. One employer mentioned his last employee was on FB and had spent a lot of time during work hours doing her FB thing. He asked me if I was on FB (I'm not).

I read life-lesson articles.

I read articles about how to interview and such.

I read about how to do resumes and cover letters, and prepared a couple of each to fit different situations.

I prepared two interview outfits, per what the agency lady told me. I work in a professional office. I had a navy blue skirt suit with magenta shell and silver necklace and tan-brown mid-heel comfy pumps. Then I had a black pantsuit with turquoise shell, silver necklace again, and black very comfy pumps. I brought with me a fairly new satchel that is on rollers...holds laptop, notepad, etc. Rollers kept me from having to carry it.

I kept a folder with extra copies of my resume, references with phone numbers.

I read more life-lesson articles. I found these informative and comforting.

I kept in touch with supportive friends. I was surprised by who turned out to be a real friend, and who wasn't.

Whoever wanted to interview me, whenever and wherever....I agreed. Each and every interview was THE one. The agent concentrated on one at a time. We treated each one separately, rather than one MORE interview, or one in a string. Each one was important and was THE one.

I ate healthy and took vitamins, and took my dogs for a walk at least once daily, sometimes twice.

As depressed as I was (I even went to one interview not having eaten or slept for 24 hours...and yet, I did okay!), I put a smile on my face, was positive, pleasant, and just told myself that I would be honest and have a pleasant experience, no matter the outcome.

I tried to talk to myself about confidence: I AM a good employee; I AM good at what I do. It was hard, but I tried to do that.

I spot-read books on self-confidence and such.

I read some religious books...this was comforting.

Appearance: Appearance is VERY important at an interview. I made sure my roots were done, my hair was shiny and healthy looking. I tried to make sure I was carefully groomed, but not overdone. My makeup - I gave myself facials in the hopes my skin would have a glow. The look I was going for was HEALTHY.

Mannerisms: I walked with a pep in my step. I spoke up, tried to be confident but not arrogant. I tried not to talk too much (a fault of mine). I tried to give the impression of health and energy (I am energetic, so that wasn't too hard, but I was depressed, so....). And of course I didn't chew gun or accept a drink during the interview (before is okay).

I read more life-lesson articles online. I found http://www.lifehack.org/ pretty good.

I came up with a Plan A and a Plan B, and a Plan C. I was going to look for a job in my area for so many months, but if I didn't find one, go to Plan B, then Plan C if B didn't work out. I was hoping for Plan A.

If I could find a job, I know that you will, too. I have a particular vocation, and I stuck with that. I also live in a city that has a fair # of those types of jobs (that's why I moved here years ago). If you have a particular occupation, that helps. There are employers out there who are willing and want to hire older workers for their experience and reliability. If you live in an area that has been hit hard with the recession, or doesn't have many jobs in your vocation, or whatever, it will take you longer. But it will happen.

Take heart. I know what you're going through. Please try to remember that you are very worthy to be hired by someone, and you will be. Let us know how things go.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 12:20 AM

80. I wound up going with a contract house for awhile

great pay - but lousy benefits. I was "lucky" though, I signed up with one that actually paid holidays and, after a year with them, they'd pay for a week's vacation. They did offer insurance, which I took but the premium was about $400/month (single coverage) and it had a $6K deductible.

I would loved it if the job they had me in had gone permanet but it became clear it wasn't going to so I kept looking (while working - always easier to find a job when you're working). I got lucky and found something - about $8k less than my last "permanent" job (and even less than the contract job) but the benefits are really good, the commute is great and the company is growing. I hope I can stay there until I retire (which I figure will be when I'm 70, so I have about 10-1/2 years to go).

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:52 AM

83. No, unless you strike gold but I have some thoughts

1. Plausible living wage without benefits-cab driver, specifically cab driver the specializes in running ambulatory medicaid patients. Warning: Your state's reimbursement may be slow or a mess.

2. Below living wage but with benefits-Pretty much the same but for a company as a direct employee, probably will have to assist and/or do wheelchairs.

3. Somewhere in the middle, get on with a call center. You may well have to temp to get in the door but if you make it you might get something approaching living wages with fair benefits. You might even be able to get coverage while you temp.

Get with placement people, especially the field specific people if they are to be had and get someone looking for you, several someones, if possible.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 02:25 AM

84. Lost my full-time job in 2009. Unemployed or underemployed since.

Have had only freelance and part-time/temp slightly-above-minimum wage work since, and only sporadically at that. I'm a "stylish 60," dye job, well dressed, excellent health, good people skills, outstanding references, etc. I get benefits via my husband, so I'm a better $$$ bargain than many other candidates. But I've only had a handful of interviews despite having applied for several jobs that appeared to be an excellent match with my background.

I have only an associates degree, but what I lack in academic credentials, I make up in hands-on experience at top firms.
Or so one would think.

I'm new to the area, and I don't yet have an established network of contacts, so I'm doing all the networking I can: Meetups, tweetups, professional organizations, etc.

Something will turn up for both of us!

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Response to tilsammans (Reply #84)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 07:48 AM

88. Don't worry about that. Many of us have multiple degrees with outstanding qualifications

 

and have the same experiences as you are. Ageism is rampant, and there is no help for it.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:29 PM

94. Lost my last "job" five years ago. They said that due to the meds I was taking for

Diabetes and high blood pressure I could no longer do the work. BULLSHIT!!!!

One week later they hired a green card at 1/2 my pay.

I am a pipe fabricator with 30 years experience.

I have been told that "since you don't have an Associates Degree in piping fabrication, you are not qualified for the job" also " we don't believe that you could take the heat in the shop" and my personal favorite " You don't speak enough Spanish to work in the shop".

Now I have my own contracting business, which means I am barely getting by. But, by GOD, I am my own man and have a small, but growing client list.

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:35 PM

95. Are you a Veteran by chance?

I just got accepted into the VRAP program. I start school in Jan and get paid to go to boot. (Thanks Obama and others) I never had the GI bill which really assisted so I was amazed this program started. It's kind of quiet and I just stumbled into it. Here's the link and they only have a few openings left. You should know if accepted in about two weeks. Oh by the way, I'm 54 years old and will be a Paralegal.


http://benefits.va.gov/vow/education.htm

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Response to maveric56 (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 02:49 PM

98. The only contacts I have sadly are here in Maryland.

I mean, I work full time, but I also work part time for a financial services company who has a lot of members that do the same thing. I also do calligraphy on the side, as well as remote administration. So I keep myself busy...

Being part of a group, even if it is business related, does provide contact to find other Full Time job opportunities, while also working the business model, which is no guarantee of earnings. I mean, it works, but there are no guarantees, and you have to be licensed.

Hope things look up.

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