HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » "In the US, shale ga...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 11:19 AM

"In the US, shale gas didn't exist in 2004. Now it represents 30% of the market."

How cheap energy from shale will reshape America's role in the world

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/nov/15/shale-energy-implications-geopolitics-america

After the fall of the Berlin Wall, the rise of China and the Arab spring, American energy independence looks likely to trigger the next great geopolitical shift in the modern world.

.......

Exploitation of fields in Appalachian states such as West Virginia and Pennsylvania, and further west in North Dakota, have transformed the US's energy outlook pretty much overnight. Professor Dieter Helm, an energy expert at Oxford University, said: "In the US, shale gas didn't exist in 2004. Now it represents 30% of the market."

If all the known shale gas resources were developed to their commercial potential in North America and other new fields, production could more than quadruple over the next two decades, and account for more than half of US natural gas production by the early 2030s, according to recent study by the Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Centre.

.......

Long-term consequences for the rest of the world are hard to predict but it is probably safe to say that many of the regimes whose global role rests on hydrocarbons alone are likely to be significantly weakened, if not swept away.

12 replies, 1112 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread

Response to Nye Bevan (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 11:26 AM

1. It didn't exist because it wasn't profitable until 2004.

 

If we could find easy to extract oil, shale gas would still be a future product.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Nye Bevan (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 11:34 AM

2. It's also destroying the rural areas where they are extracting it

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Champion Jack (Reply #2)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 12:37 PM

4. I live in one of those areas and so far I have seen none of this

(destroying). You drill a well it disturbs about 5 acres of ground. A few weeks after the wells are drilled the only evidence left is a pipe coming out of the ground and a brine tank. In this area we have 5 new motels that have just opened or under construction to house drillers and pipe-liners. All the camp grounds are packed with campers and many people rent out camping space in their yards for the workers. We have several plants being built to process the gas that will make permanent jobs. The gas-fracking is the first positive economic news in this area for 40 years. Anyone that has acreage has got checks for drilling rights (many instant millionaires) and royalty checks are coming in.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to doc03 (Reply #4)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 12:41 PM

6. i wonder how long it takes to totally damage the water table?

I hope it does't happen, but do we ever see these guys leave a place unspoiled?
I guess a lot of people feel it;s worth the gamble, because they can afford to leave now.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bettyellen (Reply #6)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 12:49 PM

8. Building a windmill on a mountaintop causes more damage to the surface

environment than a gas well. As far as the water table goes I think the strip mining for coal in this area has done more to damage the water table than fracking ever will. Those wells are a mile deep, far below the water table in my opinion. As far as peoples water wells getting gas in them that probably can be traced back to coal mining in most cases if not all.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to doc03 (Reply #8)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 01:05 PM

11. Im not worried about windmills, but am about public health disasters. I know there's a lot of

concern and controversy about the fracking happening in upstate NY. It could effect water quality and impact the health of many millions of people.
Energy companies have a very poor track record and historically prefer to pay fines later than act responsibly. It's new technology, and if there wasn't fortunes to be made now, I'm sure residents would be taking a much harder look at the risks. Because they'd have to stay at live with any fallout. But they don't, just their poor neighbors and everyone downstream.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to doc03 (Reply #4)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 01:12 PM

12. Sure, ignoring the compressor stations and gathering lines necessary to get the gas into the

midstream. The compressor stations that emit BTEX 24 hours a day. The 800 heavy truck trips necessary to develop each well. The re-fracking necessary to maintain production levels that the un-conventional gas industry has been lying about in order to finance their get rich quick at our expense scheme. This is landscape level industrialization of rural areas that has been deregulated by the usual plutocrats without regard for the consequences to the rest of us.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Champion Jack (Reply #2)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 12:49 PM

9. And these rural areas destroyed the wildnerness that was there before.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Nye Bevan (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 11:42 AM

3. Does this mean US is positioned to become one of the world's biggest energy producers

in the coming decades?

Is this fracking?

What are the environmental pitfalls?

Is this bottom line a positive thing?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to cilla4progress (Reply #3)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 12:42 PM

7. Yes and yes to your first two questions.

A discussion of the environmental issues is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_impact_of_hydraulic_fracturing
Obviously we need to be very careful to monitor and control this activity so that it does not cause pollution or contamination.

And anything which makes us less beholden to the crazies in the Middle East is a positive in my book.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Nye Bevan (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 12:40 PM

5. And at what cost?

 

Pollution of the water, pollution of the air. A continued reliance on fossil fuels because they are going to continue to be relatively cheap. The long term consequences of continuing our fossil fuel addiction are only now being recognized.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Nye Bevan (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 01:02 PM

10. Stupid fucking article completely ignores all the CO2 and Methane that will enter the atmosphere

as greenhouse gases.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread