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Sat Nov 17, 2012, 02:49 PM

Any Latin teachers on DU? I need help.

My 10 year old granddaughter, very advanced academically, wants to learn Latin.

I bought a book on Amazon for her, thinking it was a text book but it was the answer book. Cannot find the textbook.(I bought 'Latin for Children Primer A' 2003 Classical Academic Press, Camp Hill, PA)
So much for that birthday present.

Now I am aiming for Christmas.
Can anyone suggest a good text and workbook for her.
Her reading and comprehension skills are great but she would need a beginners book.
Any suggestions?

The subject of Latin gives me fright. In high school, my 2 years of Latin were enough to keep me awake at night.
In my old age, I realize that I have used Latin to help me translate or at least figure out many things. I think it would be great if she picked up the beginning of this language.
Perhaps by the time she gets to high school, it will still be offered.

I want to find the right series but am lost. Any help would be appreciated..

14 replies, 1103 views

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Arrow 14 replies Author Time Post
Reply Any Latin teachers on DU? I need help. (Original post)
Paper Roses Nov 2012 OP
ananda Nov 2012 #1
Paper Roses Nov 2012 #14
HopeHoops Nov 2012 #2
Paper Roses Nov 2012 #4
HopeHoops Nov 2012 #12
JanMichael Nov 2012 #3
Paper Roses Nov 2012 #5
Tsiyu Nov 2012 #6
Tsiyu Nov 2012 #7
rug Nov 2012 #8
demhottie Nov 2012 #9
displacedtexan Nov 2012 #10
msanthrope Nov 2012 #11
Paper Roses Nov 2012 #13


Response to ananda (Reply #1)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 03:47 PM

14. Hi, thanks for your suggestions. The links you provided are great but:

Both of then lead to the workbook I bought. I cannot find the textbook anywhere.

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Response to Paper Roses (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 03:00 PM

2. My middle daughter is well versed in Latin. Perhaps she could be of assistance.

 

She's judging a karate tournament at the moment, but I'll ask her when she gets back. PM coming.

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Response to HopeHoops (Reply #2)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 05:53 PM

4. Thanks, anxious to hear what she has to say. n/t

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Response to Paper Roses (Reply #4)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 10:39 AM

12. She'll be home soon - spent the night with my dad and youngest daughter.

 

My youngest is living with my father now and she's in an advanced Spanish class - and the only student in the class who isn't a native Spanish speaker.

If you PM me with your e-mail, I can put her in touch with you directly. That's probably the easiest way to connect with her. I did mention it to her but she was getting ready to leave with my dad. She seemed quite interested in helping.

What's funny is that she was a special ed student from 2nd grade on. She's got a combination of dysgraphia and dyslexia, so the lower case letters b, p, d, and q all looked the same to her. What really complicated it was right-left association. She'd spell "what" starting with a "t". My wife has an MS in elem. ed, and a BS in elem. ed. and early childhood and even SHE was stumped. She tried everything. The school system worked with her and in high school she embraced languages and got the only language award given out in the senior awards ceremony.

But anyway, send me the PM and I'll have her contact you. I'm sure she can be of assistance.

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Response to Paper Roses (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 03:03 PM

3. Wife's answer: A couple....one a very dry, but very good

text...Introduction to Latin, written by Dr. Susan Schelmerdine (I might need to check that spelling), and the other would be the Oxford Series as a companion that is more "fun" and has stories to read.

The Schelmerdine text is dry, but lays everything out so methodically, that one only needs to do a couple of lessons a week for a good basic understanding of the language.

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Response to JanMichael (Reply #3)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 05:55 PM

5. Thank you, I will start searching! n/t

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Response to Paper Roses (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 06:37 PM

6. We used "English from the Roots up"

and the flashcards that came with them.

They teach root words in Latin and Greek.

http://www.amazon.com/English-Roots-Up-Vol-T/dp/0964321033


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Response to Tsiyu (Reply #6)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 06:50 PM

7. Wanted to add:

Vocabulary from Classical Roots is another method a lot of homeschoolers use.

Never used it myself, but a lot of parents and teachers like it:


http://www.amazon.com/Vocabulary-Classical-Roots-Nancy-Flowers/dp/0838822525




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Response to Paper Roses (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 10:05 PM

8. If she keeps up with it she'll have a key that unlocks 2/5 of the English language.

I keeping nagging my kids to take Latin and they keeptelling me the school doesn't offer it.

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Response to Paper Roses (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 11:56 PM

9. How exciting! What an adorable granddaughter you have! Try Ecce Romani



It's the text we used starting when I was in fifth grade. There have been four editions.

Studying Latin is a wonderful investment in the future.

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Response to Paper Roses (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 12:35 AM

10. Rosetta Stone

Don't forget about Rosetta Stone. It really is fantastic and fun. I have a Master's in French and German, as well as minors in Latin and Russian. I learned Italian for a trip last spring using Rosetta Stone, and I had no trouble at all mastering 3 levels in 4 months. I sound like an advertisement, but it really was fun.

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Response to Paper Roses (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 12:43 AM

11. Amo, Amas, Amat... it will decline...

forgive the joke.


Okay---- see if there are old Jesuits near you. Best way to learn.

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Response to msanthrope (Reply #11)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 10:46 AM

13. Amaus,Amatis, Amant

Habeo capitis dolore.

You can bet I never heard that in class.

Caesar mortuus est.

Amen.

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