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Sat Nov 17, 2012, 04:23 AM

 

Origins of libertarianism: When miltie friedman worked as a paid propagandist

...According to Congressional hearings on illegal lobbying activities '46 was the year that Milton Friedman and his U Chicago cohort George Stigler arranged an under-the-table deal with a Washington lobbying executive to pump out covert propaganda for the national real estate lobby in exchange for a hefty payout, the terms of which were never meant to be released to the public. The arrangement...was finally revealed during he Buchanan Committee hearings on illegal lobbying activities in 1950. But then it was almost entirely forgotten...

I only came across the revelations about Friedman’s sordid beginnings in the footnotes of an old book on the history of lobbying by former Newsweek book editor Karl Schriftgiesser, published in 1951, shortly after the Buchanan Committee hearings ended. The actual details of Milton Friedman’s PR deal are sordid and familiar, with tentacles reaching into our ideologically rotted-out era.

It starts just after the end of World War Two, when America’s industrial and financial giants, fattened up from war profits, established a new lobbying front group called the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE) that focused on promoting a new pro-business ideology—which it called “libertarianism”— to supplement other business lobbying groups which focused on specific policies and legislation...

The FEE is generally regarded as “the first libertarian think-tank...” A partial list of FEE’s original donors in its first four years includes: The Big Three auto makers GM, Chrysler and Ford; top oil majors including Gulf Oil, Standard Oil, and Sun Oil; major steel producers US Steel, National Steel, Republic Steel; major retailers including Montgomery Ward, Marshall Field and Sears; chemicals majors Monsanto and DuPont; and other Fortune 500 corporations including General Electric, Merrill Lynch, Eli Lilly, BF Goodrich, ConEd, and more...

http://www.nsfwcorp.com/dispatch/milton-friedman


Libertarianism, a corporate funded, wholly-owned venture. These guys plan long-term, and yeah, they CONSPIRE.

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Reply Origins of libertarianism: When miltie friedman worked as a paid propagandist (Original post)
HiPointDem Nov 2012 OP
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #1
upi402 Nov 2012 #2
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #4
upi402 Nov 2012 #3
byeya Nov 2012 #5
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #6

Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 11:58 AM

1. kick

 

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 12:15 PM

2. I remember PBS airing his free trade propaganda

It pissed me off then. And we sit in that stink today.

kick, rec

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Response to upi402 (Reply #2)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 12:37 PM

4. yes, we do. what surprises me is that it all started immediately after the war, funded

 

by the largest corporations in the world.

"our" ideas = their ideas

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 12:27 PM

3. Shame of the Nobel Prize in 1976 - awarding this asswipe

And PBS for airing his BS.
Then Raygun got elected using him as an adviser in 1980.
Raygun used this guy once in office.

The Business RoundTable won. We all lost - and are getting our asses handed to us to this day.

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Response to HiPointDem (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 12:55 PM

5. Pinochet loved his Milton and his U of Chicago cockamami ideas. As Milton said, as he lined

 

his pockets, It's all about the money.

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Response to byeya (Reply #5)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 12:57 PM

6. sure was for him. people like him judge others by their own evilness. they think

 

everyone is like them.

problem is, they have enough power that by turning everything to shit, they *mold* others to become like them.

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