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Fri Nov 16, 2012, 10:16 AM

"what's wrong with the idea of including dental care in a national health care system...?

Romney's inadvertent, insincere good idea

By Steve Benen

Failed Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney caused a bit of a stir this week when he told donors President Obama won re-election because he bribed women and minorities with "big gifts," such as health care and education. As Rachel noted on the show last night, even many on the right found his comments unhelpful.

<...>

For those who can't watch clips online, the Republican went on to tell supporters: "What I would do if I were a Democrat running four years from now, I'd say, 'You know what, dental care will be included in Obamcare.' ... And Republicans will say, 'No, that's going to cost a trillion dollars,' and the Democrats will say, 'That's fine, you know, we'll pay it.'"

Putting aside the fact that access to affordable dental care wouldn't cost $1 trillion, Romney's suggestions actually sounds quite reasonable. Sure, he meant it sarcastically, and this was hardly a sincere policy idea, but if we ignore motivations, what's wrong with the idea of including dental care in a national health care system in which Americans have access to medical attention they need?

Dental care need not be considered some superfluous luxury. Good teeth are important to digestion; healthy gums prevent heart disease; and poor dental health can lead to chronic pain. In extreme cases, untreated dental problems can be literally fatal. If you go to an area hosting a free clinic, and you see the thousands of struggling, uninsured people lining up before dawn in the hopes of seeing a physician, you'll find many of them are looking for dental care.

- more -

http://maddowblog.msnbc.com/_news/2012/11/16/15215510-romneys-inadvertent-insincere-good-idea

Senator Bernie Sanders is a strong advocate for dental care reform

Dental Care

Sen. Bernie Sanders recognizes that oral health is an integral part of overall health. Yet millions of people today are unable to get the dental care they need. As a result, cavities, which are highly preventable, are the most common chronic disease of childhood and one in four adults age 65 and older has lost all of his or her teeth. Untreated oral health conditions can lead to not only tooth loss, pain and infection, but also contribute to an increased risk for serious medical conditions such as diabetes and poor birth outcomes. Dental problems also result in missed work and school, poor nutrition and a decline in overall well-being. As chairman of the Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging, Sen. Sanders has introduced comprehensive legislation to address the dental crisis by improving access to oral health care.

About 40 years ago, when Sen. Sanders lived in the tiny town of Standard in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont, he saw a young man whose teeth were rotting in his mouth. It was a sight he never forgot.

Lack of access to affordable dental care is not just a problem in Vermont, but it is also a national problem, one too often ignored. Low-income families, minorities, pregnant women, the elderly, those with disabilities and those who live in rural communities often have a much harder time accessing and affording a dental provider than other groups.

While tooth decay is almost entirely preventable, people who do not see a dental provider do not get the early diagnoses, preventive services and early interventions that can halt or slow the progress of most oral diseases. As a result, one quarter of children aged 2-5 and one half of those 12-15 have tooth decay. In Vermont in 2009, 62,000 adults and 10,000 seniors went without dental care because they could not afford it.

As many as 130 million Americans do not have dental insurance coverage. Traditional Medicare does not offer dental benefits, and many veterans do not qualify for benefits through the Department of Veterans Affairs. Dental services are a required benefit for children but an optional benefit for adults who have Medicaid.

More than 47 million people live in designated "dental health shortage areas" where there are too few dentists to meet existing needs. Only 20 percent of the nation's dentists provide care to people with Medicaid, which means that many low income families, seniors and people with disabilities have a difficult time finding a dentist.

One piece of good news: Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) play a critical role in providing cost effective dental care to over 3.5 million Americans including about 25,000 Vermonters, regardless of their ability to pay. Sen. Sanders is committed to expanding health centers and other options for the delivering high quality dental care at an affordable cost.

In February 2012, Sen. Sanders held a hearing on the crisis in oral health care and released a report on the issue.

Then, in June 2012, Sen. Sanders introduced the Comprehensive Dental Reform Act of 2012 (S. 3272) to address some of these problems and bring an end the dental care crisis.

This bill, which is supported by over 40 organizations, extends comprehensive dental health insurance to millions of Americans who do not have coverage today. It creates new access points for those who currently do not have a dentist. In addition, it works to expand the number of dentists and dental professionals by investing in education and workforce development, and by funding research into improving access.

Sen. Sanders has said: "When we talk about the health care crisis in America we often ignore a very important aspect of that crisis: that tens of millions of Americans are unable to access affordable dental care and they suffer as a result of that." He is committed, through this bill and other efforts, to improving access to safe and affordable dental care for all Americans.

http://www.sanders.senate.gov/legislation/issue/?id=6ef9bf37-1d51-402f-a4f5-d2d5572a3cf3

56 replies, 4134 views

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Reply "what's wrong with the idea of including dental care in a national health care system...? (Original post)
ProSense Nov 2012 OP
randome Nov 2012 #1
TeeYiYi Nov 2012 #47
Hoyt Nov 2012 #2
ProSense Nov 2012 #3
raging moderate Nov 2012 #4
Grammy23 Nov 2012 #5
BlueCaliDem Nov 2012 #6
Major Nikon Nov 2012 #8
kenfrequed Nov 2012 #12
Skittles Nov 2012 #48
BlueCaliDem Nov 2012 #26
beac Nov 2012 #44
BlueCaliDem Nov 2012 #46
JDPriestly Nov 2012 #7
rhett o rick Nov 2012 #9
phantom power Nov 2012 #10
byeya Nov 2012 #15
Gregorian Nov 2012 #11
Johonny Nov 2012 #13
valerief Nov 2012 #14
Jackpine Radical Nov 2012 #16
HopeHoops Nov 2012 #17
Doctor_J Nov 2012 #18
aquamarina Nov 2012 #19
Doctor_J Nov 2012 #20
SoapBox Nov 2012 #21
dotymed Nov 2012 #22
BumRushDaShow Nov 2012 #23
Gore1FL Nov 2012 #24
dae Nov 2012 #25
SunSeeker Nov 2012 #27
EC Nov 2012 #28
Festivito Nov 2012 #29
femrap Nov 2012 #30
Kalidurga Nov 2012 #31
Vox Moi Nov 2012 #32
thereismore Nov 2012 #33
SamKnause Nov 2012 #34
boomerbust Nov 2012 #35
nichomachus Nov 2012 #36
smirkymonkey Nov 2012 #53
Stewland Nov 2012 #37
Cleita Nov 2012 #38
Exultant Democracy Nov 2012 #39
sunwyn Nov 2012 #40
PCIntern Nov 2012 #41
Hugabear Nov 2012 #42
sarge43 Nov 2012 #43
glinda Nov 2012 #45
joeunderdog Nov 2012 #49
librechik Nov 2012 #50
felix_numinous Nov 2012 #51
MrModerate Nov 2012 #52
Raine Nov 2012 #54
patrice Nov 2012 #55
loudsue Nov 2012 #56

Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 10:22 AM

1. Absolutely a good idea.

Not just teeth, but your mouth in general is a breeding ground for germs and this can have a deleterious effect on your overall health.

Brush and rinse and stay healthy. If dental checks were covered by insurance, more people would be inclined to pay more attention to the state of their mouths.

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Response to randome (Reply #1)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 04:58 PM

47. "Your mouth in general"...

I completely agree with you that dental should be covered because of the mouth in general comparison. Just as there is gynecological health coverage for that other orifice, there should be oral health coverage for the mouth and teeth. Infections in the mouth can cause meningitis, heart disease, etc.

I've always said that if there is a god, s/he should work on the flawed designs of teeth and backs.

TYY

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 10:36 AM

2. Great idea and I certainly wish for it, but it ain't gonna happen in our life-times.


I think dental coverage is limited in Canada, England, etc., too (although better than ours in some cases).

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Response to Hoyt (Reply #2)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 10:42 AM

3. Sad, isn't it?

Imagine how great it would be if the United States took the lead on comprehensive dental coverage.



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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 10:42 AM

4. Bravo for this wonderful post about Governor Toothpaste Logo!

I love the details, the organization of ideas, and the constructive suggestions. Hopefully, this idea will catch fire and lead to an eventual addition of dental services to the Affordable Health Care Act.

One of my most painful childhood memories will always be my little brother crying in the nights because of a toothache my underpaid working mother could not afford to get fixed. Our hardworking mother somehow managed to gradually increase her earnings a little, and many kind people helped us. Years later, we both managed to get into college on a shoestring, but he had to quit college with a nervous breakdown which turned out to be permanent mental illness. I will always wonder if he might have made it without that persistent toothache added to the almost unbearable struggles our whole family had undergone. It may sound silly, but I know we used to marvel privately at the complaints of our schoolmates when they HAD to go to the dentist. And my brother died early of heart disease. Did you know that severe tooth decay has been linked to that?

You dentists and dental technicians who go into schools and other places to give free services to poor kids and adults are ministering angels in disguise. May your hearts be blessed forever!

Mr. Romney, you are a false king, but may you prove, in this idea, to be a true prophet! Come to think of it, that Republican R Squiggle logo DOES look like a squirt of toothpaste, doesn't it?

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 10:49 AM

5. Unfortunately, we are misled to believe that "Dental Insurance" is a luxury and only for those

with plenty of money or who have good benefits through their employer. Ask any physician and they can tell you that neglecting your teeth and gums can be a fatal mistake. But by mischaracterizing this vital health insurance benefit, people may not realize the importance of routine dental care. I have never understood why "dental insurance" is not part of a "health insurance package" but many people who have health insurance do not have coverage for their dental health needs.

I am among the fortunate ones who has dental insurance and have had for many years. At the age of 64 I have all of my own teeth, few dental problems and the ones that arise are found and repaired before they lead to bigger problems (cardiac issues). My husband, likewise, has had routine dental care for most of his adult life. He did not have that option as a child (due to poverty) and entered adulthood with many decayed and missing teeth. Once he got dental insurance all of that changed and he has not had to deal with that kind of problem ever again. The pain of decayed and abscessed teeth is not minimal and cannot be ignored!

Dental Health Insurance is not just a "good idea". It should be part of any Health Insurance Plan. To not cover the teeth and gums is not only wrong, it is bad practice if you want to offer "preventive medicine."

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 10:57 AM

6. Comprehensive health care *should* include dental care, like in Europe.

In Holland, where my brother lives, he pays 28 euro per month (he has a good paying job and thus must pay a premium for his health/dental/vision insurance) and it covers everything, not just doctor visits without co-pays. This government sponsored health insurance covers health, dental, hospitalization, vision, AND medicine - without co-pays and all for 28 euro ($30 bucks).

I believe the European model is what President Obama is aiming for. His administration has already begun to launch their public option - two health insurance companies to compete directly with ProfitCare - and they'll be added in the exchanges. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/28/health/us-to-sponsor-health-insurance-plans-nationwide.html

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Response to BlueCaliDem (Reply #6)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:16 AM

8. I think dental care should be covered to the extent it overlaps with health care

Things like teeth whitening, braces, and other cosmetic things shouldn't be covered, but regular routine dental care, fillings, root canals, crowns, should all be covered because they absolutely can and do affect overall health.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #8)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:28 AM

12. I completely agree

I see no reason why we shouldn't cover this. And oral health is linked fairly conclusively to cardiac health too.

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Response to kenfrequed (Reply #12)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 05:16 PM

48. it is linked to mental health, too

feeling embarrassed to smile can put a huge damper on your social and professional life

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #8)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:02 PM

26. Yes, that's how it is in Europe, too. No cosmetic dentistry is included - like braces or whitening.

Only the necessary dental care as part of health care.

I'm sorry I hadn't made that clear in my initial post.

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Response to BlueCaliDem (Reply #26)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 01:27 PM

44. Actually, braces aren't always merely a cosmetic issue.

One of the reasons I needed them was to correct a bite alignment issue that would have caused many of my teeth to be ground away over the course of decades.

So yes, IMO, some braces should be included in our imaginary dream national dental plan.


I do agree with you on whitening.

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Response to beac (Reply #44)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 04:47 PM

46. I know sometimes it's needed, and of course there are exemptions which are then covered

by the insurance companies. But, of course, I was referring to those who want braces just to make their teeth straighter and prettier.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:13 AM

7. The European countries I lived in included dental care.

You paid for it in the form of taxes taken from your paycheck before your trip to Walmart or your payment of the rent. After all, without good medical and dental care (and might I add things like hearing aids and eyeglasses for those who need them), your health can be endangered. People who cannot hear or see are prone to accidents. And bad teeth can lead to bad health overall. We don't all have to have the fanciest cosmetic dental surgery, but at least the basic stuff that is needed to have a mouth that can chew healthy food should be covered.

And how about educating people regarding the dangers of too much (notice I say too much and not all) sugar? That would at least alleviate a lot of the suffering our children go through in the dentist's chair. We also need lots and lots of education about other aspects of dental hygiene. Older people suffer from gum disease.

If your teeth can't chew, you tend to eat fewer vegetables and fruits and that is not good.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:21 AM

9. Let's call it "RomneyDental". LOL. nm

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:22 AM

10. dental care separate from other medical... more American bone-headedness

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Response to phantom power (Reply #10)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:32 AM

15. Any bodily inflammation is harmful, especially that associated with teeth and gum problems.

 

There have been studies to show that chronic peridontal inflammation is related to heart disease, for example.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:26 AM

11. For decades, I've been saying this.

It's my belief that many more people are ill due to dental problems than just about anything else.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:29 AM

13. why is your Jaw and your Eye not a part of your Health?

The answer I think is traditional, but it is freaking crazy to have 3 separate insurance plans. I had an inner ear problem and ended up bouncing between an ophthalmologists, a dentists and medical doctors. The experience hammered home to me how freaking crazy AND frustrating the whole private insurance bureaucracy is (even is you have the insurance).

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:30 AM

14. Dental care? Meh. What's imperative is that men get their hard-on meds!

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:42 AM

16. Dental care? Hell yes.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:47 AM

17. That would hit the red states pretty hard.

 

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:49 AM

18. Red States would of course get a discount

since they average only 3.7 teeth per head.

Edit: should I alert myself before the sarcasm-impaired flag me?

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:51 AM

19. And why not vision care as well?

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:54 AM

20. If the president really wants a "grand bargain" in his legacy, THIS

is the sort of thing he should shoot for

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:54 AM

21. Great idea.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:55 AM

22. I currently live in Tn.

We are ranked 50th in America for dental care. It is appalling. most people that I know do not health insurance, let alone dental insurance, and it shows. As a heart patient, I am aware that poor dental care directly affects the heart. Most heart patients (like me) suffer from gingivitis.
I have an uninsured, disabled, older brother. His molars are rotting and occasionally, one falls out. The pain he suffers is debilitating. He too has heart disease, but SS has (so far) denied his disability.
It is unfathomable that in America in 2012 our average citizens are required to suffer horribly and then die.
Wake up America. Dental care is as important as health care and should definitely be considered a basic human right.
Being wealthy is not a basic human right, but to those (usually) born into the lap of luxury, we act (and legislate) as if their wealth IS a basic human right.
IMO, especially Americans live in the Dark Ages. It will never change unless we and our fellow citizens, take to the streets and demand equality.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:56 AM

23. And if Rmoney had won, here is the correct conversation

"What I would do if I were a Democrat Rethuglican running four years from now, I'd say, 'You know what, dental care wars in Iran and Syria will be included in Obamcare.' the Defense budget ... And Republicans Democrats will say, 'No, that's going to cost a trillion dollars,' and the Democrats Rethuglicans will say, 'That's fine, you know, we'll we won't pay for it since we didn't pay for the last two wars because they are all off budget, and although they contribute to the deficit and debt, we must maintain 'American Exceptionalism™' and Peace through Strength™'..'"

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 11:57 AM

24. Nothing

Rmoney is simply that out-of-touch.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:02 PM

25. Dental care is also important in education,

our clinic has a mobile dental clininc that goes out to local schools providing dental care for many of the children. Most Dentists will not take Medicaid leaving many low income families without the means to send a child for checkups much less actual dental care.
Our Dentists have been telling us (the board of Directors) they have no idea how most of the kids function much less pay attention in the classroom or study at home.
It's been slow but we are making headway.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:05 PM

27. How the fuck did dental care get separated from health care in the first place?!

You need your teeth to eat. Tooth infections can kill you. Maintaining dental health is the most basic of healthcare needs.

My brother, who has never been able to afford dental insurance let alone health insurance, once pulled out a rotten tooth by himself with a pair of pliers. He was desperate and in pain. I learned about it after he called me and told me his jaw had become infected and he had to go to the emergency room with a fever from it.

I helped him pay for the antibiotics the ER docs prescribed. But there was no way he could pay for the ER visit. The ER visit cost thousands of dollars--which could have paid for years of dental insurance. This whole mess could have been avoided with a $100 cavity filling if my brother had been able to see a dentist regularly. My brother is destitute and judgment proof, so the hospital (i.e. the rest of us) paid that ER bill. Our current system is so wasteful and causes so much misery. It really is barbaric.

Dental care is not a "gift." It is a basic human right. It is shameful that the richest nation on earth denies its people this right.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:12 PM

28. That's what I said to myself

Obama should just say, "Thanks, Mitt, that's a wonderful idea. See, America, I told you Mitt could be helpful."

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:14 PM

29. But, it would lower GDP by saving us all money.

And then some rich guy would not make profit on unnecessary pain.

Can't have that.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:20 PM

30. I want to

 

live in a civilized country that wants its citizens to be healthy. Is that too much to ask?

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:22 PM

31. We need to pay attention to education on this as well.

I don't know how oral health became separated from other health issues, but it does seem that policy makers think that teeth aren't part of ones body.

I think we can do this and do it in a way that might actually be a net gain in terms of money. We should start in kindergarten by issuing each child a toothbrush and a tube of toothpaste. The teacher can have each child brush his and her teeth after their snack. They can continue to do this for the next 11 years. If nothing else it will teach and reinforce the notion of oral hygiene. For many students this will be the only tooth brush they have. But, at least during the school year they will have that experience. They can get a new toothbrush every 3 mos with one to take home for the summer.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:26 PM

32. Dental work ... vision correction ... head bone connected to the tail bone.

The piece-work approach to public health might work for Frankenstein's monster but let's face it:
As long as the human body is seen as a free-enterprise zone and illness as a profit opportunity our health care system will be inefficient and unaccountable.
Remember: it is always more profitable to treat illness than it is to prevent it.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:28 PM

33. All of that money would be syphoned into the red states. nt

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:30 PM

34. Dental and vision

I thought that was a very strange comment.

Dental and vision should be included.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:34 PM

35. I'm on Medicare

And I am sorely in need of some very very expensive dental care.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:36 PM

36. It comes under preventive care, which is always cheaper

If your teeth are in good shape, then you avoid a host of other diseases, which are more expensive to treat.

Another area is in foot care. No health-care plan that I know of covers foot care, unless it's an active disease of the foot or you have diabetes.

I wear orthotics. I have to pay for them out of pockets. Without them, I would have foot, leg, and back problems. If my lack of orthotics caused a disc problem in my back, the my health insurance would cover that, paying tens of thousands of dollars for surgery, rather than $200 for orthotics.

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Response to nichomachus (Reply #36)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 09:55 PM

53. My brother in law is a dentist. The amount of money saved for preventative care is more than worth

it. My parents always had us in the dental office because they had great dental care policies. We all have very healthy teeth and have never had to have any serious dental work because we took care of our teeth before they became a problem. Therefore, no expensive dental work.

It is very important that people have access to early dental care and it is cheaper than waiting until thier is a dental emergency to do so. Why is that so hard to understand?

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:38 PM

37. This will happen if we advocate for it

 

If a really big push is made by we the people then Dental and Vision will be included. Yes we can.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:46 PM

38. Nothing and California's Medi-Cal program for the poor includes basic dental.

http://www.denti-cal.ca.gov/WSI/Default.jsp?fname=Default

When ACA becomes fully implemented, we the people, need to start pushing for it to be included.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:57 PM

39. Yes its a great idea, and Dental care gets a lot of bang for its buck

in so far as health outcomes.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 12:59 PM

40. I think if I could get dental care a lot of my health probelms would clear up

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 01:04 PM

41. As a practicing dentist...

I'm all for it.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 01:05 PM

42. Silly goose, the mouth isn't part of the body.

I have never understood why dentistry and vision are considered separately when it comes to medical coverage. They are BOTH parts of the body, why aren't they covered along with the rest of the body?

Nobody requires you to purchase separate Gastrointestinal Insurance, Lung insurance, Reproductive insurance, etc...

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 01:12 PM

43. No argument here. Dental care is absolutely essential to basic good health.

Much cheaper to prevent health problems than to treat them. I think I heard once that a healthy society is a productive society.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 02:51 PM

45. Dental implant care should be a ton less expensive.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 05:58 PM

49. Had gum surgery this week. I asked the exact same question.

Why is the abscess in the flesh of my cheek and gums not considered part of my body--especially because it was a potentially dangerous medical concern--and not covered by my excessively expensive healthcare coverage?

The receptionist was quick to agree and was sympathetic as she ran my credit card. She expressed lament about the patients who could not afford the surgery. I feel for them.

The other part of me wanted to know why the dentist had to charge these exorbitant fees so that he could make $3-400,000/year while people had to go without treatment for infections that could spread to their brains. But I decided not to get into it because that conversation would be just like another trip in the dentist chair.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 05:59 PM

50. Make it so! (And save lives) n/t

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 09:14 PM

51. Separating dental coverage

leads to people thinking that it is optional. Our whole body is interconnected and so should to the approach in medical benefits.

This is yet one more reason corporations have 'no business' setting social standards of any kind. I am a socialist when it comes to health education and welfare.

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 09:44 PM

52. I think we've established that Romney just doesn't get it. n/t

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 09:59 PM

54. IMO a very good idea, I would like to see that included. nt

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Fri Nov 16, 2012, 10:12 PM

55. Can't we also pressure HC Ins. Cos. through ACA exchanges to provide what we, the market, want or

not give them our business?

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Response to ProSense (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 01:08 AM

56. Dental care should immediately be considered a part of health care.

Dentists fees have gone through the roof in the past 10 years.

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