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Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:00 AM

Seen tonight while walking my dog.



"Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), also known as winter depression, winter blues, summer depression, summer blues, or seasonal depression, is a mood disorder in which people who have normal mental health throughout most of the year experience depressive symptoms in the winter or summer, spring or autumn year after year. In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), SAD is not a unique mood disorder, but is 'a specifier of major depression'.

The symptoms of SAD mimic those of dysthymia or even major depressive disorder. There is also potential risk of suicide in some patients experiencing SAD."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seasonal_Affective_Disorder

"Are There Warning Signs of Suicide?

Warning signs that someone may be thinking about or planning to commit suicide include:

Always talking or thinking about death
Clinical depression -- deep sadness, loss of interest, trouble sleeping and eating -- that gets worse
Having a "death wish," tempting fate by taking risks that could lead to death, such as driving fast or running red lights
Losing interest in things one used to care about
Making comments about being hopeless, helpless, or worthless
Putting affairs in order, tying up loose ends, changing a will
Saying things like "it would be better if I wasn't here" or "I want out"
Sudden, unexpected switch from being very sad to being very calm or appearing to be happy
Talking about suicide or killing one's self
Visiting or calling people to say goodbye"

SUICIDE WARNING -- Depression carries a high risk of suicide. Anybody who expresses suicidal thoughts or intentions should be taken very seriously. Do not hesitate to call your local suicide hotline immediately. Call 800-SUICIDE (800-784-2433) or 800-273-TALK (800-273-8255) or the deaf hotline at 800-799-4889."

http://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/depression-recognizing-signs-of-suicide

If you recognize the above symptoms in someone you know, take action. Get involved. Those of you who, at some point, should have gotten involved - but didn't - know what I'm talking about.

34 replies, 3127 views

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Arrow 34 replies Author Time Post
Reply Seen tonight while walking my dog. (Original post)
wtmusic Nov 2012 OP
CaliforniaPeggy Nov 2012 #1
JimDandy Nov 2012 #3
CaliforniaPeggy Nov 2012 #4
JimDandy Nov 2012 #9
JimDandy Nov 2012 #2
Mothdust Nov 2012 #6
CaliforniaPeggy Nov 2012 #7
Contrary1 Nov 2012 #5
IdaBriggs Nov 2012 #19
Contrary1 Nov 2012 #20
Care Acutely Nov 2012 #22
IdaBriggs Nov 2012 #31
marions ghost Nov 2012 #24
BlueMan Votes Nov 2012 #8
CaliforniaPeggy Nov 2012 #11
JimDandy Nov 2012 #12
BlueMan Votes Nov 2012 #14
JimDandy Nov 2012 #17
BlueMan Votes Nov 2012 #18
Contrary1 Nov 2012 #13
Major Nikon Nov 2012 #16
yardwork Nov 2012 #28
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #10
Whovian Nov 2012 #15
Not a Fan Nov 2012 #21
kooljerk666 Nov 2012 #23
marions ghost Nov 2012 #25
Sekhmets Daughter Nov 2012 #26
wtmusic Nov 2012 #27
Sekhmets Daughter Nov 2012 #29
wtmusic Nov 2012 #30
Sekhmets Daughter Nov 2012 #32
wtmusic Nov 2012 #33
Sekhmets Daughter Nov 2012 #34

Response to wtmusic (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:08 AM

1. Thank you for posting this.

The information you've listed here is so important for all of us to know.

It is such a sad photo.....

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Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Reply #1)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:22 AM

3. Must be missing something-no photo shows for me.

Maybe that's why the title doesn't make sense. What's in the photo?

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Response to JimDandy (Reply #3)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:39 AM

4. The photo shows some sort of an industrial metal box.

Like an electrical box that sits on the sidewalk. Oh, it's a phone equipment box; it says AT&T on it.

On it someone wrote "my best friend killed himself."

I have no idea why the photo wouldn't show. Sorry!

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Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Reply #4)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 01:00 AM

9. Oh that is SO sad! n/t

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Response to wtmusic (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:19 AM

2. Okay, good info, but why the disconnected "walking the dog" title? n/t

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Response to JimDandy (Reply #2)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:40 AM

6. the title underscores the shocking "reality checks"

That can take one by surprise when we least expect it. The poster went out to walk his dog, but before long was forced by the graffiti message left by someone in his midst tragically affected by suicide. A sign of the times. They say people in Spain are jumping from Windows lately. Sad. V. Sad.

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Response to JimDandy (Reply #2)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:41 AM

7. The poster (the person who wrote the original post) was walking his dog when he saw this.

That's why the title says that.

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Response to wtmusic (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:39 AM

5. I have been diagnosed with this disorder...

though it's never been to the point of considering suicide.

Even as a teenager, I found myself becoming depressed as the leaves fell. While others marvel at the changing colors, I have always looked at it as more of a death of sorts. I just figured it was an "Oh no, the party's over till next spring" feeling.

I have learned that turning lights on in the middle of the day helps immensely. Background noise is a must for me. I try to find a couple major projects to keep me busy.

I figure if I can tough it out until March 1st, I've got it made...

until next Fall.

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Response to Contrary1 (Reply #5)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 02:48 AM

19. Have you tried supplementing with liquid Vitamin D?

Helped a friend with this problem. If this is your issue, you should know within 48-72 hours if it will help. Very noticeable.

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Response to IdaBriggs (Reply #19)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 03:45 AM

20. Vitamin D..."Sunshine'

I had not considered that. I take calcium with Vit. D twice daily. My daughter's doctor told her that people in the US don't get enough.

Couldn't hurt. And, with all that is going on here lately, it might even give me an added boost of energy. I will give it a shot.
Thanks for the suggestion.

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Response to Contrary1 (Reply #20)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 04:26 AM

22. Yes it could hurt. ADE&K are fat soluable and build up in your liver and

other organs if you take too much.

If you think you might be D deficient, get tested and follow up accordingly.

D is not just a vitamin, it is a hormone and poor balance can upset your parathyroid, calcium, vitamin D axis.

Be safe. Consult your primary provider.

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Response to Contrary1 (Reply #20)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 11:53 AM

31. Another poster has mentioned the dangers of overdosing.

My assumption is that you are smart enough to use common sense, and use the FDA guidelines/not overdose on it.

I also recommend talking to a pharmacist (as opposed to a physician), unless you have specific health concerns that *should* be addressed with a physician. (Cheaper, plus they can talk about any concerns with any other medications you are already taking.)

You can read about it here: http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

Table 2: Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for Vitamin D

0–12 months* 400 IU (10 mcg)
1–70 years 600 IU (15 mcg)
>70 years 800 IU (20 mcg)

* Adequate Intake (AI)

Wikipedia says this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_D

Mortality: Low blood levels of vitamin D are associated with increased mortality, and giving supplementary vitamin D3 to elderly women in institutional care seems to decrease the risk of death. Vitamin D2, alfacalcidol, and calcitriol do not appear to be effective. However, both an excess and a deficiency in vitamin D appear to cause abnormal functioning and premature aging. The relationship between serum calcidiol level and all-cause mortality is U-shaped, Harm from vitamin D appears to occur at a lower vitamin D level in the black population than in the white population.


A milk company (Horizon Organic) says this: http://www.horizondairy.com/everyday-nutrition/dairy-nutrition/

Milk is one of the few dietary sources of vitamin D — a critical nutrient that helps our bodies absorb calcium.
•The American Academy of Pediatrics recently doubled its recommended daily intake of vitamin D from 200 IU to 400 IU for all infants, children and adolescents.
•It is estimated that fewer than 5% of adults 50 and over are getting enough vitamin D.


Be safe. Use your brain. And, as I said, if you are deficient in it, you will know if it is helping within 48-72 hours (if you use a liquid one in the morning).

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Response to Contrary1 (Reply #5)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 07:57 AM

24. you might also

consider taking up an outdoor wintertime activity. Doesn't necessarily have to be a sport, but just a regular outside activity or chore, like walking the dog or sweeping the driveway, whatever.

The point is to confront the season and neutralize the dread of it, which gets to be chronic. Find a way to embrace it.

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Response to wtmusic (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:42 AM

8. the writer doesn't seem to be much of a 'best friend'...

 

if he didn't see it coming.

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Response to BlueMan Votes (Reply #8)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 01:04 AM

11. People often do not see it coming, even best friends.

The symptoms are not always as clearly visible as the ones written here.

We don't know all the circumstances...

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Response to BlueMan Votes (Reply #8)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 01:05 AM

12. I think you're projecting the "didn't see it coming"

The best friend just couldn't stop it.

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Response to JimDandy (Reply #12)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 01:22 AM

14. perhaps it wasn't even a suicide.

 

maybe his best friend did something like getting drunk and crashing his car, or did some other thing that resulted in his accidental death.

not likely though, admittedly.

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Response to BlueMan Votes (Reply #14)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 02:30 AM

17. Yes, I never heard anyone say "killed himself"

without it being a suicide. Think the wording would have been "my best friend died" if it was an accident. So sad no matter what.

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Response to JimDandy (Reply #17)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 02:35 AM

18. i have.

 

I've heard it used in the context of accidental death.

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Response to BlueMan Votes (Reply #8)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 01:19 AM

13. My sister-in-law's nephew committed suicide a few months ago...

No one, not family or friends, saw it coming. He owned a business that was doing very well. He and his wife had their second daughter just six weeks earlier.

He called his brother who is a Catholic priest, made a confession of sorts, and hung up. By the time the police got there, he was gone.

No note, nothing. He left behind a wife who loved him, two young children, and several employees who had no clue that anything was wrong.

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Response to BlueMan Votes (Reply #8)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 01:24 AM

16. Not everyone cries for help

For people who have never experienced severe depression, the symptoms are hard to spot.

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Response to BlueMan Votes (Reply #8)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 09:56 AM

28. A close friend of mine committed suicide 31 years ago.

I still remember the shock and horror I felt when I learned. I still think of him with sadness and feel guilty for not saving him somehow, even though he was a thousand miles away when it happened. Until you experience having a close friend commit suicide - or even worse, a child - you can't imagine the pain.

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Response to wtmusic (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 01:03 AM

10. the recession & housing crash has increased the suicide rate.

 

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Response to wtmusic (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 01:24 AM

15. K&R

 

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Response to wtmusic (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 04:09 AM

21. Help for SAD

Vitamin D3 has been shown to help those with SAD - which makes a LOT of sense if you think about it. For months out of the year- fall and winter - much of the US has greatly reduced ability to make VD3 naturally because the sun is simply too far away.

If you go over to the Vitamin D Council (www.vitamindcouncil.org) - a non-profit advocacy agency - to to health conditions, then to "Mental Health and Learning Disorders" - or do a search.

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Response to wtmusic (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 07:39 AM

23. So far I feel OK this winter but.......

 

........I have had issues in winter.

Using plant-grow/bluish daylight type fluorescent bulbs for 15 minutes in the evening & morning used to help a lot.

The theory was to reset circadian rhythms to spring/summer.

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Response to kooljerk666 (Reply #23)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 08:07 AM

25. I think those "daylight" bulbs and devices do help

My Australian friend grew up where Christmas is in summer. When she came to America she said she thought all the Christmas lights were so over-the-top--until she experienced a full winter. She said the lights helped her get through it. Now she understands the urge to illuminate.

When I'm home I turn on strings of Xmas lights inside from Nov to March. Cheap solution.

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Response to wtmusic (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 08:27 AM

26. Whoa on the guilt stuff, please

***Those of you who, at some point, should have gotten involved - but didn't - know what I'm talking about.***

Survivors, many of whom did everything possible to get help for their friend or family member, experience years of guilt wondering, "What service did I miss?" "Why couldn't I find the answer?" "What more could I have done?"

Furthermore, some forms of depression tend to run in families. Bi-polar disorder shows up in families with a history of alcoholism, for example. Thus you are expecting someone who has great difficulty coping with their own life to find the perfect solution for another troubled person.

Your post has great value until you ruin it with that bit of righteousness.

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Response to Sekhmets Daughter (Reply #26)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 09:52 AM

27. Well I guess if you did everything possible it wouldn't apply to you, would it?

Give me a fucking break.

I stand by my OP.

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Response to wtmusic (Reply #27)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 11:33 AM

29. I see my point flew right over your head...

Never said it applied to me...but as a grief counselor I witnessed just how hard people, who have done everything humanly possible, struggle with a deep sense of failure. Your sanctimony has no place in any discussion of suicide. You have just rendered your OP worthless.

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Response to Sekhmets Daughter (Reply #29)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 11:43 AM

30. Went over MY head? WTF are you talking about?

If someone has done "everything humanly possible" it wouldn't apply to them either, would it?

That comment was made because of a personal experience that will haunt me for life. I am trying to save others from having to endure that grief. For someone who professes to be a grief counselor, your post is one of the most clueless I've seen on this board.

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Response to wtmusic (Reply #30)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:07 PM

32. Grief is neither rational nor proportional...

I was talking about the fact that people who have done everything they could still feel enormous guilt about their failure to prevent a suicide. That they could easily interpret your closing statement, ***Those of you who, at some point, should have gotten involved - but didn't - know what I'm talking about.*** as further proof they didn't do enough.

I am merely pointing out that your otherwise excellent post should not point fingers at anyone.... There is no guarantee that your intervention would have prevented the suicide, it might have simply postponed it. There are 150,000 registered users on DU, and some no doubt, are coping with the pain of this type of loss. But perhaps I expect too much from someone who resorts to an ad hominem attack to win a point. Have a nice day.

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Response to Sekhmets Daughter (Reply #32)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:18 PM

33. It's proven that intervention helps, and a grief couselor would know that.

Some questions you might want to ask yourself:

Should the fact that intervention doesn't always work prevent someone from doing it anyway?
Should someone who professes to be a grief counselor know that it's better to intervene than not?
Is there any basis for your bizarre interpretation that "not getting involved" is the same as "not doing enough"?
Do you have any idea what "ad hominem" actually means?

You have a nice day, too.



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Response to wtmusic (Reply #33)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 12:38 PM

34. You take everything to the extreme...

I said there was no guarantee. Of course intervention helps...I never said it didn't. Nor did I say you should not advocate for intervention. Calling me clueless was definitely ad hominem...

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